Fall 2016 - Talonbooks

  • Scrolling view
  • Grid view
more
Titles per page
  • 1
    catalogue cover
    for love and autonomy Anahita Jamali Rad Canada
    9781772010176 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:September 16, 2016
    $16.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.35 in | 151 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:62 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Anahita Jamali Rad’s debut book of poetry juxtaposes Marxist economics with pop culture lyrics, from FKA Twigs to Sonic Youth, tangling the "You & I" of relationships and social identification. She asks: How is it possible to communicate when the "I" speaks from the margins? Who is the "I" when Motown’s doo-wop and post-punk’s Telecaster jangles shake up the body’s rhythm?

      for love and autonomy speaks from a place of discomfort, where internalized pop songs mutate communication and meaning under the guises of individuality and romanticism. Jamali Rad’s "I" is highly textured, musical, and suspect. Her poems bring us together with their rebellious voices – only to push us away into alienation when mimicry falls flat, when the "I" loses its context, when we become oppressed, thingified, dependent, and belligerent.

      Jamali Rad deals with the stuff of everyday life: work and sex, friendship and love. Her critical attention to the structure of these social relations creates a poetics of trial and failure, questioning the very "culture" responsible for its making as she forges a way for the possibility of radical resistance in language.

      Bio
      Anahita Jamali Rad was born in Shiraz, Iran and now lives on unceded Coast Salish Territories a.k.a. Vancouver. Anahita Jamali Rad is the author and binder of handmade chapbooks such as, Un In Uni Form, You and Me Baby, Patterns, Heart/Felt/Poems, and say what you like about my glasses, but i never get drunk and drank confused when i’m out with the working classes. Alongside Danielle LaFrance, she co-organises the women’s critical reading and discussion group, About a Bicycle, and co-edits a biannual journal of the same name. She studied Philosophy at the University of British Columbia and is currently doing a diploma in Publishing at Langara College.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Anahita Jamali Rad paces traces turns feminist Marxist utopian poetics politics on their / our ears."
      — J.R. Carpenter
      “Urgent and incising, these poems follow wide swaths of form and expression through a Marxist and Post-Marxist love and search for equality. They are as intimately woven scenes uttered after the cruelty of human bondage as they are vilifying critiques of the society that does not end and mauls us all. They are in part confessional as we are all confessional, and these poems are also in part movements toward a future where the liberation of poetry binds us together, and not to the oppressor. … The poetry is refreshing. Whether stark, disjointed and grammatically voided columns, or impressions of stanza blocks cascading from segment to segment, this poetry is its own. … for love and autonomy is a collection that will remain relevant for if ‘we’ are ‘we’ and if ‘us’ are ‘us’ its crystalline multiplicity of facets will inspire the reader into consistent action and revision of action.”
      –Queen Mob’s Tea House
      "Vancouver poet and editor Anahita Jamali Rad’s first trade poetry collection, For Love And Autonomy (Vancouver BC: Talonbooks, 2016), is wildly smart, dark and funny".
      —rob mclennan
      “In For Love And Autonomy, [Jamali Rad] performs a sustained critique of the self-evident and self-determining quality of the lyric subject. … [She asks] what love, what autonomy, what poetry is possible under the conditions of late capitalism? … The poems in For Love And Autonomy function, often simultaneously, in two distinct registers: an analytic register, to lay bare their own implication in the field of capitalist production and the extent to which they are implicated in it; and a poetic or ethical register, to feel out what it is possible to say or do, or what should be said or done in response to a world overrun by capitalism. This twofold critique excruciatingly charts the powerlessness of life in this historical moment. … Jamali Rad is unflinching in mapping the extent to which life is subordinated to work. … a harrowing but nevertheless compelling collection.”
      —Debutantes: Reviewing New Voices in Poetry
      “The most intriguing section of the collection’s ten is probably “post-harem heavy breathing,” built on fragmented, often unfinished or overlapping lines (“no I won’t / shed a tear / gas or shot / with rubber”). Each poem title is taken from the previous poem, creating a mise en abyme… The shattered prose evokes bombshells or the exploded consciousness of the disenfranchised, as well as the panting of a panicked or aroused character.”
      Canadian Literature
      “The poetry is refreshing. Whether stark, disjointed and grammatically voided columns, or impressions of stanza blocks cascading from segment to segment, this poetry is its own..”–Queen Mob’s Tea House
      “It’s time to enter the language, to discover what lies beyond … Jamali Rad’s poetry is significant. It will require many readings with much discussion to appreciate the value of her contribution to the world of language.”—Prairie Fire
      “It’s time to enter the language, to discover what lies beyond. … Jamali Rad’s poetry is significant. It will require many readings with much discussion to appreciate the value of her contribution to the world of language.”—Prairie Fire
      Wildly smart, dark and funny … thick with theory … Part of what impresses about this collection is the way in which it writes so deeply around and through the complexities of its subject, utilizing prose, short lined lyrics and fragments to write out such a multi-faceted book-length poem on the combined physical, social and political acts of simply ‘being.’ There is such a deep engagement in these poems, as well as real questions about the autonomous body, social responsibilities and potential actions, and whether or not freedom and/or free will is even possible within the framework of civil society. —rob mclennan
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Friendly Fire Danielle LaFrance Canada
    9781772010183 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:October 03, 2016
    $18.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 140 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:70 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Comprising experimental poetry and prose, Friendly + Fire interrogates the male subjective experience of war and the gendered implications of camaraderie or “brotherhood” while aligning the seriousness of a war target with the frivolities of gossip: “MILITARY LINGO SUBLIMATES SMACK TALK FROM HERE ON IN.”

      Friendly + Fire employs a character named H.S. (also to be read as “his”) as a filter for engaging with and through real-life stories of friendly fire. In the first section, the Tarnak Farm Incident (where four Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan were killed by American Air Force pilot Harry Schmidt) is used as source material, intersecting with questions about receiving a “pink slip” from one’s employer and the mental and physical conditions endured by fighter pilots (suppressed appetite, prescribed sedatives and amphetamines to regulate sleep, and stress tolerance). Reductionist language is used to describe friendship in the 21st century (forced affect in the workplace and Facebook friends).

      Act I of LaFrance’s first book, Species Branding, ends with the line: “crippled on my last leg. where are our friends?” It is a question that has carried forward into Friendly + Fire, acting as the connective tissue between these two texts.
      Bio
      DANIELLE LAFRANCE LIVES ON OCCUPIED AND STOLEN LANDS CARED FOR BY THE X?M?TK??Y??M, S?WX_WÚ7MESH, AND SELILWITULH peoples. LAFRANCE COMES FROM GREEK AND DUTCH ANCESTRY, AND IS LEARNING WHERE THE FRENCH CANADIAN RELATIVES CAME FROM. FOLLOWING THE WOULD-BE POETICS MAPPED IN JUST LIKE I LIKE IT (TALONBOOKS 2019), LAFRANCE ARRIVES AT READING AND WRITING FROM A POSITION KNOWING ILLUSIONS ARE DESTROYED. LAFRANCE’S RECENT POETRY PROJECT #POSTDILDO THINKS AND ACTS THROUGH FANTASY, RAPE CULTURE, MODES OF COMMUNICATION, YEARNINGS, AFTERMATHS, AND LOST IDEAS. MUCH ANIMAL LOVE. LAFRANCE MAKES MONEY AS A COMMUNITY LIBRARIAN AND FROM SIDE HUSTLES. WITH ANAHITA JAMALI RAD, LAFRANCE CO-EDITED THE JOURNAL AND DISCUSSION SERIES ABOUT A BICYCLE, OF WHICH THERE WERE 5 ISSUES. LAFRANCE AUTHORS FRIENDLY + FIRE (TALONBOOKS 2016) AND SPECIES BRANDING (CAPILANO UNIVERSITY EDITIONS 2010). LAFRANCE INVESTS IN LISTENING AND/OR ADDRESSING AND/OR RESPONDING TO THE RADICAL ROOT OF THINGS.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “As smart and swell as [LaFrance’s previous book] Species Branding was, Friendly Fire constitutes a considerable ratcheting up of risk, affect, sheer nerve. … LaFrance’s use of ‘H.S.’ is incisive. … LaFrance’s tone oscillates wildly between Philosophe and Riot Grrrl, which is great for those who prefer to be disturbed. … Jagged with political sensation. … A world of milquetoast poetry could benefit from paying heed to Danielle LaFrance’s brave aggressions.”
      Contemporary Verse 2
      “LaFrance’s Friendly + Fire is composed out of an aesthetic of war and friendship, intimacy and accidents of upheaval, whether political, social or personal, writing out the specifics of armed conflict and intimate acts. Hers is a critique of multiple systems, as well as her own actions, and each thread throughout the collection, interweaving and occasionally getting (deliberately) tangled. In LaFrance’s poems, colours and contexts blend.”
      —rob mclennan
      “An appropriately intelligent book that does not hold back for any person or anything. It rouses, coughs and spits in protest, defies and enlightens all the same. … In its grimmest moment, Friendly + Fire reminds me of who we are and who we have the potential to be.”
      —Queen Mob’s Tea House
      "Friendly + Fire is a capella pornography, a multi-vocal argument concerning the collateral damages attendant upon military aggression, where the exceptional conditions definitive of combat suffuse an everyday civic.”
      —League of Canadian Poets blog
      “A combination of expose and manifesto and critical historicism, this book gutted me and brought to light the actions and reactions of my daily existence as a testament to the reality of a masculinity shrouded in the subconscious, in the unexamined, in the latency and laziness of the being “dude” (sluggish, slightly gross) in the second decade of the 2000s. And for all of this, I am thankful. … With this volume following a chapbook and full length, LaFrance is no foreigner to the proverbial pen, and thus every instance of her existence is at once personal and external, prospective and retrospective entwined. The six sections that compose this book are a response to a crime. And they are also an independent and striking look at the retributive act of reflection. An appropriately intelligent book that does not hold back for any person or anything. It rouses, coughs and spits in protest, defies and enlightens all the same. … In its grimmest moment, Friendly + Fire reminds me of who we are and who we have the potential to be.”
      —Queen Mob’s Tea House
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    False Starts A Subterfuge of Excellent Wit Patrick Leroux Canada, Alexander Rock Canada, Katia Grubisic Canada, Jenn Stephenson Canada, Nicole Nolette Canada
    9781772010275 Paperback DRAMA / Canadian Publication Date:November 18, 2016
    $18.95 CAD 5.5 x 8 x 0.32 in | 160 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:25 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      False Starts presents a series of determining moments between two people stuck reliving the same moment over and over, but in unexpected ways and in different genres (from diary to dramatic dialogue, film script to sound installation). Their interdependence and fundamental inability to say how they feel for one another over twenty years – in spite of their eloquence, in spite of their creativity – constitutes the background of the ongoing spectacle of their relationship.

      Made up of a series of short pieces originally published in French as Dialogues fantasques pour causeurs éperdus, this translation by the author and Alexandre St-Laurent with Katia Grubisic, also offers previously unpublished texts. Originally staged for the stage, screen, and elevator at Montreal’s matralab.

      Bio
      Louis Patrick Leroux is an associate professor in both the English and French departments at Concordia University. A playwright and theatre director, he is also a scholar whose academic research focuses on cultural discourse, research-creation, Québec theatre and contemporary circus. He was playwright in residence at Sudbury’s Théâtre du Nouvel-Ontario (1993–94, 2005–06, and 2006–07), the Leighton Artists’ Studios at the Banff Centre for the Arts in 1994, and the CEAD International playwrights residency in 1999. He founded and managed Ottawa’s Théâtre la Catapulte over the 1990s and has since focused on impossible, improbable, necessary drama.

      Alexander Rock was born and raised suburban Québec. He lives in Montréal, where he studies at the Université de Montréal. His work has appeared in The Puritan and Matrix and his translation of Hugo Beauchemin-Lechapelle’s "untitled/sans titre" can be found in Tightrope Books' The Best Canadian Poetry in English, 2016. He has also modestly worked as a playwright and dramaturge.

      Katia Grubisic is a writer, editor, and translator. Her work has appeared in various Canadian and international publications, and her collection of poems What if red ran out won the Gerald Lampert award for best first book.

      Marketing & Promotion
  • 4
    catalogue cover
    In a Blue Moon Lucia Frangione Canada
    9781772010350 Paperback DRAMA / Canadian Publication Date:November 09, 2016
    $17.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 160 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      When Frankie’s dad dies, her mom, Ava, can’t afford to live in the city anymore. The only asset they’re left with is a farmhouse situated on twenty acres of land far outside of town. Ava decides to move there and start an Ayurveda clinic on the property, giving her precocious and grieving daughter a new start. One problem presents itself, though: a squatter who won’t leave.

      Will, professional photographer, long-estranged brother-in-law to Ava, and uncle to Frankie, lives rent-free on the farm and isn’t eager to give up his space. While mother and daughter face the challenges of starting over and grieving, they also need to figure out how to weave a new man into the picture. Soon, though, Frankie finds in Will someone to look up to and trust during her time of emotional upheaval, and Ava discovers a companion who pushes her to grow and helps her to discover her potential. In their journey the group thread together a new understanding of family, and a tender love story unfolds.

      In a Blue Moon combines dance, recollection, photography, and heartfelt emotion to examine three characters who each grieve very differently. Love, compassion, and companionship are discovered and shared as each member of the trio finds peace in their new reality, in their own way.


      "With strong writing and characters, In a Blue Moon is a complex, authentic story about three people learning how to live with each other after such a profound loss."
      – Tessa Perkins, The Peak

      Bio
      Lucia Frangione is an award-winning actress, teacher, and the author of more than twenty-eight plays, several having gone on to become international productions. An esteemed playwright with a fresh, post-feminist voice, Frangione creates plays that tackle complex themes and relationships with wit and courage. She was the recipient of the 2006 and 1998 Gordon Armstrong Playwright Awards, won the Sydney Risk playwright award (Cariboo Magi), and was nominated for seven Jessie Richardson Theatre awards (Espresso). She lives in Vancouver.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Poignant and touching, heartfelt and hilarious."
      – Thousand Islands Playhouse

      "With strong writing and characters, In a Blue Moon is a complex, authentic story about three people learning how to live with each other after such a profound loss."
      – Tessa Perkins, The Peak


      “At the end I wanted more. My neighbor put it very well. She said, ‘It’s like reading a really good book and you don’t want it to end.’ Exactly!”
      —North Country Public Radio
  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Entering Time The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw Colin Browne Canada
    9781772010398 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies Publication Date:January 02, 2017
    $19.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 160 gr | 196 pages Carton Quantity:38 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      During the groundbreaking Charles Edenshaw exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 2013, poet Colin Browne found himself returning often to study three large argillite platters carved by the Haida master in the late 1800s. Produced several years apart, each depicts an identical scene at the same moment: two frightened figures in a canoe appear to be on a mission. One is the Raven, in supernatural form, brandishing a spear; the other, in the stern, is a human-like figure with a circular head. On one platter he holds a paddle; on the other, two his arms are raised in a state of panic. He is the helmsman, known as Fungus, or Fungus Man, or Biscuit Man.

      The Raven and Fungus Man appear early on in the Haida epic poem "Raven Travelling," not long after the Raven releases human men from a clamshell. Their mission is to enable men and women to go forth and multiply. The three platters, celebrated not only for their craftsmanship but also for their insight into the psyche, are rarely brought together in one place, and the fact that Edenshaw returned, with a sense of humour, to this primal scene, suggests that the theme was as important to him as it was to his contemporary, Sigmund Freud.

      Browne launches his unexpected journey of discovery with a simple question: "Who was Fungus, or Fungus Man, and why did he become the one responsible for the miracle of human procreation?" Every good story is an origin story — and a mystery story — and in Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw, Browne ranges through the fields of art history, literature, ethnology, and myth to discover a parallel history of modernism within one of the world’s most subtle and sophisticated artistic and literary cultures.

      The text is supplemented by an interview with visual artist Neil Campbell whose recent paintings speak to Fungus Man’s art-historical echoes and contemporary relevance.

      Bio
      Colin Browne has published five volumes of poetry. His most recent publications are Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw (Talonbooks, 2016) and The Hatch: Poems and Conversations (Talonbooks, 2015). His books have been nominated for a Governor General’s Award and the Dorothy Livesay Award / B.C. Poetry Prize. He is a celebrated filmmaker; his experimental documentary White Lake was nominated for a Genie Award for Best Feature Documentary. His recent exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery, I Had an Interesting French Artist to See Me This Summer: Emily Carr and Wolfgang Paalen in British Columbia (2016), explored the brief encounter between these two Modernist artists in Victoria, B.C., in August 1939, and presented the first extensive exhibition of Paalen’s work in Canada. His collaboration with composer Alfredo Santa Ana, Music for a Night in May, was presented at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre in May 2018. Recent essays exploring the links between Surrealism and the art of the Northwest Coast have appeared in exhibition catalogues in the U.S. and Europe. He is currently working on new curatorial projects and preparing a collection of essays for publication. Until recently, he taught in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, where he is Professor Emeritus.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Entering Time explores family, crucial episodes in the development of art, the brutalities of colonial history, the origins of gender, and the creative cunning of Raven. Colin Browne finds in Fungus Man the spirit of resistance. This was vital to the Haida; nothing could now be more important to all of us.”—Hugh Brody, author of Maps and Dream
      “With a passion that is contagious, Colin Browne leads readers across the realms of epic poem, oral narrative, science, art, and detective story as he pursues Raven and his helmsman – the mysterious Fungus Man – on an enthralling journey into time and history.”—Karen Duffek, co-author of The Transforming Image
      “Colin Browne provides a thoughtful, provocative analysis of Charles Edenshaw’s depictions of Raven’s journey to help fulfill women, and in doing so, contemplates humanity’s existence.”—Gid7ahl-Gudsllaay, Lalaxaaygans, Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson
      “[Browne] is to be congratulated on treating Edenshaw’s work not as a separate ‘ethnographic’ art but as modernist hybrid work that mirrored what was going on in the Haida world in late nineteenth and early twentieth century B.C. Browne’s detailed discussion of Charles Edenshaw’s platters – and the political, social, and economic environment in which that creation took place – is informed by his dependence on the knowledge and insight of contemporary Haida scholars and artists and also by his extensive reference to academic discussion. … A delight to read and an accessible and lively introduction to the twists and turns of Haida mythology.”
      —The Ormsby Review
  • 6
    catalogue cover
    Once in Blockadia Stephen Collis Canada
    9781772010152 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:September 16, 2016
    $18.95 CAD 6 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 216 gr | 148 pages Carton Quantity:60 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      In this collection of long and serial poems, Stephen Collis returns to the commons, and to his ongoing argument with romantic poet William Wordsworth, to rethink the relationship between human beings and the natural world in the Anthropocene. Collis circumambulates Tar Sands tailings ponds and English lakes—and stands in the path of pipelines, where on Burnaby Mountain in 2014 he was sued for $5.6 million dollars by energy giant Kinder Morgan, whose lawyers glossed Collis’s writing in court by noting that "underneath the poetry is a description of how the barricade was constructed." Called by Eden Robinson "the most dangerous poet in Canada," in Once in Blockadia Collis is in search of how we can continue to resist—as we only begin to understand the extent of our complicity and the depths of the predicament we are in.

      The bulk of Once in Blockadia is made up of two long sequences evolving from found texts, and two long poems that engage with Wordsworth. The two found texts relate to two blockades Collis was involved in: one blocking the flood of commodities into the Port of Vancouver, and the other blocking the potential flood of oil out of Vancouver. In both cases the poetry and "notes" that follow offer glimpses into the documentary "fact" of events, the resistance behind the blockade, the reasons for them, and the complex of resistant affects driving the events. The two Wordsworthian long poems involve two walks—one in the Alberta Tar Sands, and the other in Wordsworth’s beloved Grasmere. In the first instance Wordsworthian description is applied to the impossible to aestheticize Tar Sands; in the second, Wordsworth’s own beloved home is revealed not as an alternative to the destruction of extraction, but as conditioned, surrounded, and structured by it.

      Bio
      Stephen Collis >is a poet, editor, and professor. His many books of poetry include The Commons, On the Material, awarded the BC Book Prize for Poetry, To the Barricades, and (with Jordan Scott) DECOMP. He has also written two books of literary criticism, a book of essays on the Occupy Movement, and a novel. In 2014 he was sued for $5.6 million by U.S. energy giant Kinder Morgan, whose lawyers read his writing in court as "evidence," and in 2015 he was awarded the Nora and Ted Sterling Prize in Support of Controversy. He lives near Vancouver, on unceded Coast Salish Territory, and teaches at Simon Fraser University. His website is www.beatingthebounds.com.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “One of the most striking examples of political poetry I’ve seen in a while. … [Once in Blockadia] could easily be considered his strongest collection to date … While the three volumes (to date) that have made up his ongoing “Barricades project” – Anarchive (New Star, 2005), The Commons(Talonbooks, 2008/2014), and To the Barricades (Talonbooks, 2013) – have cohered and articulated language as an element of social action, Once in Blockadia is denser and more focused, composed as much as a cudgel and a call-to-action as a communique on or consequence of the Trans Mountain pipeline.” —rob mclennan
      "Collis’s book moves beyond the scale of both Williams’s man/city and Ginsburg’s generation/nation to bring the bioregion into deep focus as both place (actually inhabited) and space (increasingly uninhabitable). Collis’s strength as a poet is his ability to hold in simultaneous suspension the descriptions of particular lifeforms and of sprawling, capitalist ecocidal apparatus … The poetic “doing” Collis does in Blockadia is already more thoroughly embedded in bioregion than is most contemporary ecopoetry. It is more fluid in its shifts of time, scale, and system, and readier to spill off the page into practice."
      Boston Review
      “Collis is mindful of the entwined nature of historical events and our emotional attachments to the places that we share or defend. … Once in Blockadia is a valuable book for allies, poets, and scholars … Collis’ work represents a nascent ecopoetics of place for the twenty-first century. I was immediately touched by it; my first impulse was to recommend it to close friends and to colleagues invested in the troublesome and shifting language of emplacement.”
      —William V. Lombardi, for Canadian Literature
      “This book lives in Realms Ecological and is … somewhat punk about it. Once in Blockadiais uniform in concern, but not in technique or style. … These are militantly humane texts about climate disaster … Collis is working with the postmodern lyric. His most common syntactical gambit is a jaunty, conversational line that is then crashed into by one boiled down, deeply overstressed. We bounce along then jam: jerk: stick: recommence. It’s a lively, effective tactic. … A sad, angry, critical, noble book is Blockadia.”
      Contemporary Verse 2
      Once in Blockadia is the anvil we’ve been waiting for. Political and ecological, civil and riotous, Stephen Collis has crafted work demonstrative of a poetic system that contends beautifully all the damning systems around us.”
      —Yellow Rabbits
  • 7
    catalogue cover
    Reading Sveva Daphne Marlatt Canada
    9781772010169 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:September 16, 2016
    $19.95 CAD 5.56 x 9.75 x 0.5 in | 159 gr | 88 pages Carton Quantity:41 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Reading Sveva is award-winning author Daphne Marlatt’s response to the life and paintings of Sveva Caetani, an Italian émigré who grew up in Vernon, B.C.

      Daughter of an Italian prince, leftist, and scholar of Islam, Sveva grew up with the multilingual and highly cultured European traditions of her parents who moved to Vernon in 1921, when Fascism was on the rise in Italy. At age eighteen, after her father’s death in 1939, Sveva was forced into home-seclusion for twenty-five years with her grieving mother. When her mother died, she entered the community of Vernon and flourished as a high school teacher and respected painter. Her life experiences took the form of an extensive series of dry-brush paintings modelled on the structure of Dante’s Divine Comedy, as well as poems and philosophical commentary.

      Marlatt’s lasting interest in the lives of immigrants to the West Coast continues in Reading Sveva, a thoughtful collection of ekphrastic and lyric poems that respond to Sveva’s insular life, the late beginnings of her artistic grown in 1960, and the meaning of home.

      Bringing her own perspective as an immigrant and as a woman, Marlatt illuminates the life of this forgotten female artist whose work is a testament to the struggle of the female artist, and the search for a sense of belonging.

      Bio
      Daphne Marlatt’s work in oral history (Opening Doors), in two novels (Ana Historic and Taken), and in earlier poetry (Steveston in particular) has been concerned with the lives of immigrants to the West Coast. She arrived with her family as a child immigrant herself in 1951. Her early involvement with the TISH poets and their interest in Black Mountain poetics in the 1960s influenced the development of her poetic, further shaped by her subsequent interest in feminist poetry and theory, particularly the work of Nicole Brossard and Erin Moure. She was co-founding editor of the innovative prose magazine periodics and the bilingual feminist journal Tessera. In 2006, her contemporary Noh play, The Gull, received the first full cross-cultural production of a Canadian Noh play in Canada, winning the international Uchimura Naoya Prize. In 2005, she was appointed to the Order of Canada in recognition of a lifetime of service to Canadian culture. In 2009, her long poem The Given won the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize, and in 2012 she received the George Woodcock Lifetime Achievement Award.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Book Awards:

      Liquidities
      2014 ReLit Awards, poetry category (shortlisted)

      The Gull
      Winner of the prestigious 2008 Uchimura Naoya Prize

      This Tremor Love Is
      Finalist for the 2002 BC Book Prize: Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize


      “In Reading Sveva, Daphne Marlatt meets a kindred spirit in Sveva Caetani (1917–1994), a visual artist who, with originality equal to Marlatt’s own, strove to dissolve the same binary concepts that have preoccupied the poet and novelist throughout her career. … The poems are neither commentary, nor interpretation, nor do they evaluate or judge. Rather, they represent the summoning of one artist’s intuitive knowledge of another artist’s being. … At their most powerful, Marlatt’s poems conduct a kind of running interview with Sveva, addressing her as ‘you,’ quoting her own writings back to her in a new context.”
      Pacific Rim Review of Books
      “Everything that Marlatt has published is instinct with caring, intelligence and a feel for technical innovation.”
      Toronto Star
      “Marlatt’s language conveys a rich sensuality, a sensibility honed to a fine edge.”
      —Judith Fitzgerald
      "In writing that brilliantly combines historry, narrative, ekphrasis, imagination, and speculaion, Marlatt creates a reader’s version of Caetani’s life… Marlatt’s poems embody a generous attention to details that unfold into worlds."— Capilano Review
  • 8
    catalogue cover
    The Days Forecasts, Warnings, Advice M.A.C. Farrant Canada
    9781772010077 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:September 13, 2016
    $14.95 CAD 5 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 160 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:63 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      It’s hard to worry about the future when you’re laughing at the hilarious absurdity of daily life.

      The days we live go by like slugs eating their way through leaves; everything changes, yet nothing changes, and the years soon accumulate. Who doesn’t read their daily horoscope, searching for guidance about what’s to come, how to live? What is life, but ordinary and special days, time passing, humour, sex, death, and love (making it all bearable)? All these are repeated gestures that run through The Days, a kind of absurdist guidebook made up of ninety unconventional, very short stories collected in three tight sections. This is fiction that thinks, fiction that cuts to the chase, told with Farrant’s trademark humour and acerbic wit. Her miniatures gracefully articulate the contemporary zeitgeist: anxiety about the future coupled with absurd mundanity. Somehow, always, Farrant captures the moments that buoy us up, crystallizing the experiences keeping us from being overwhelmed while calling our attention to overwhelming truths.

      Let yourself be excited and delighted. Farrant’s artfully spare stories – averaging a couple of paragraphs each – offer enough food for thought (and mood) to keep you going for months. Dip in occasionally to be reminded of the strangeness of us, or read from beginning to end and immerse yourself in a slightly skewed version of reality – one in which people are frank and the world is unforgiving as it shimmers like light on water, sometimes blinding, always dazzling.

      Bio
      M.A.C. Farrant is the author of fourteen works of fiction, non-fiction, memoir, and over one hundred book reviews and essays for the Vancouver Sun and the Globe & Mail. Her memoir, My Turquoise Years, which she adapted for the stage, premiered April 4 to May 4, 2013 at the Arts Club Theatre’s Granville Island Stage in Vancouver, British Columbia. Her novel, The Strange Truth About Us: A Novel of Absence, was chosen by The Globe & Mail as a Best Book of 2012. The World Afloat: Miniatures, a collection of very short fiction, won the City of Victoria Book Butler Book Prize for 2014.

      A full-time writer currently residing in North Saanich, B.C., Farrant’s work as been nominated for many awards, including the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize, National Magazine Awards, Victoria Book Prize, and two Jessie Richardson Theatre Awards for her play My Turquoise Years, among others. She has taught writing at the University of Victoria, Victoria School of Writing, and Banff Centre for the Arts, and was writer-in-residence at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Victoria City Book Prize 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews
      "Farrant’s work is infused with iconoclastic innovation."
      Globe & Mail
      "One of the best humorists in the land."
      Ottawa Citizen
      "Canada’s most ascerbic and intelligent humorist."
      BC Bookworld
      “A beguiling, quirky delight … Ever-whimsical and confidently left-field. … It is fully possible to discern serious intent behind the book’s gleeful riffling through cultural ephemera; the odd humor, off-center observations, and clever wordplay anchor the book … A tilted or askew vision operates throughout and takes readers to unexpected but rewarding places.”
      Publishers Weekly
      “Hilarious, absurd, these pieces of micro-fiction are like a mirror held up to the reader’s life. Farrant’s spare prose packs full stories into a few short paragraphs that you will be thinking about for weeks afterwards. She has her finger on the pulse of our times.”
      —City of Victoria Butler Book Prize jury, 2017
      “Once again M.A.C. Farrant has delivered a packet of fictional snippets with heft. … Grounded in the everyday, Farrant’s observations reveal the unusual in the usual, and she does it with her charming and quirky sense of humour. … Farrant has her finger firmly on the pulse of contemporary life and can see both its beauty and its flaws, and they’re often the same thing. … The Days: Forecasts, Warnings, Advice is great fun, but it also makes you look at the world in a fresh way.”
      Vancouver Sun
      “Nimbly walking the tightrope between prose and poetry … knife-sharp narratives … an odd, Alice in Wonderland-esque calendar … You can feel you’re growing older in the few hours it takes to read these tales. … a book that doesn’t give the brain a moment’s rest.”
      Pacific Rim Review of Books
      “The short prose pieces in this new collection are sharp and shapely embodiments of the old adage ‘Less is more.’ Here M.A.C. Farrant curates her own brilliant and uneasy theory of modern life where every day is ‘a combination of breath and panic and glory’.”
      —Diane Schoemperlen
  • 9
    catalogue cover
    The Envelope Vittorio Rossi Canada
    9781772010312 Paperback DRAMA / Canadian Publication Date:December 27, 2016
    $18.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 140 gr | 144 pages Carton Quantity:25 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      This comedy-drama skewers the film world when a veteran playwright must decide between accepting government funds to turn his new play into a Canadian-made feature film with a multi-million dollar contract. Or accept an American producer’s offer of total artistic control but far less money. Will Moretti stand firm in his artistic and personal integrity? Or take the cash?
      Bio
      Vittorio Rossi: Born in Montreal in 1961, Italian-Canadian playwright Vittorio Rossi grew up in the district of Ville-Émard and graduated from Concordia University in 1985 with a BFA specializing in theater performance. In 1987 he was playwright-in-residence at Montreal’s prestigious Centaur Theatre, during which he completed his first full-length play, The Chain, which opened Centaur’s twentieth-anniversary season in October 1988. The show was then produced at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. From 1990–91 Rossi was writer-in-residence at Concordia University where he also taught playwriting.

      Rossi has also written several screenplays and directed a film version of his play Little Blood Brother. In 2003 he taught screenwriting at the University of Sherbrooke. His talent extends to acting as well, with screen credits in both television (Urban Angel) and film (Le Sphinx, 1995; Canvas, 1992; Malarek, 1989).

      Rossi has established himself as a significant playwright in the national theater community with his award-winning plays.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Hard-hitting on the one hand, sweet as sugar on the other, The Envelope left the impression of a well-baked, enjoyable piece of Italian pastry." – Montreal Gazette
      The Envelope makes us laugh, gasp, and cheer all throughout the play. Right up until the dramatic conclusion when Michael makes his lifechanging decision, there’s never a dull moment, and the clever storyline always keeps us guessing.”
      —Gemma Cocomello, montrealites.ca
  • 10
    catalogue cover
    U Girl Meredith Quartermain Canada
    9781772010404 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:September 16, 2016
    $19.95 CAD 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.75 in | 311 gr | 240 pages Carton Quantity:18 Canadian Rights: Y Talonbooks
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Award-winning author Meredith Quartermain’s second novel and seventh book, U Girl, is a coming-of-age story set in Vancouver in 1972, a city crossed between love-in hip and forest-corp square.

      Frances Nelson escapes her small-town background to attend first-year university in the big city. "You’ve got to find the great love," her new friend Dagmar tells her. But what makes it love instead of sex? And what kind of love bonds friends? She gleans surprising answers from Jack, a construction worker, Dwight, a mechanic and dope peddler, Carla, a bar waitress who’s seen better days, and her English professor and sailing friend, Nigel.

      U Girl blurs the line between fiction and reality as Frances begins to write a novel about the people she comes to know. With seamless metafictional play and an engagement with place that has come to be Quartermain’s definitive style, U Girl tells the story of a woman’s struggle to be taken seriously – to be equal to men despite her sexual attraction to them, and to dislodge accepted narratives of gender and class in the institution of the university during the "free love" era. In this sprawling and perceptive novel, Quartermain takes us through sexual experimentation, drugs, jobs, meditating on Wreck Beach, sailing up through Desolation Sound, and studying at the University of British Columbia.

      U Girl is a story that pays homage to local haunts and literary influences in equal measure. Quartermain brings to Canadian literature a wholesome and vital female perspective in this long-awaited bildungsroman.

      Bio
      Meredith Quartermain is known across Canada for her award-winning, cross-genre writing. Vancouver Walking won the BC Book Award for poetry Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize, Nightmarker was a finalist for the Vancouver Book Award, and Recipes from the Red Planet, her book of flash-fictions, was a finalist for a BC Book Prize. In Rupert’s Land, her first novel, a town girl helps a residential-school runaway in Alberta in the 1930s.

      Quartermain was the 2012 Writer in Residence at the Vancouver Public Library, where she led workshops on songwriting and writing about neighborhoods, and enjoyed doing manuscript consultations with many writers from the Greater Vancouver community. She’s now continuing these activities as Poetry Mentor in the Writer’s Studio Program at Simon Fraser University.

      She has taught English at the University of British Columbia and Capilano College and led workshops at the Naropa Summer Writing Program, the Kootenay School of Writing, and the Toronto New School of Writing.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “Quartermain has truly outdone herself this time. … This bildungsroman is an extraordinary new addition to Canadian literature … Readers should prepare themselves for a tidal wave of emotion, reflection, and new perceptions when they dive into Quartermain’s latest masterpiece.” – Ubyssey
      “Quartermain takes her readers through the lens of a young woman challenging her small town looking glass with a much wider angle...Much like [the protagonist, Frances’s] characters in her novel [within the novel], the pace and lessons of life are far from stagnant and [Frances] continues to forge on to a new frontier.” —Pacific Rim Review of Books
      “A whimsical pleasure to read, and at times deeply felt and affecting … it will amuse and tease anyone who has ever been young, poor and confused about life. Which must be just about everyone.”
      Vancouver Sun & Calgary Herald
      “As a meta-narrative about the process of writing a novel, U Girl succeeds … On the one hand, we have a universal coming-of-age story, and on the other, the vivid local setting rich in its use of detail. … In the end, we are drawn convincingly into Frances’s world.”
      PRISM International
      “Meredith Quartermain, however and as always, cannot disappoint with her new novel, U Girl. Recognition of Quartermain’s versatility leads to astonishment at her oeuvre. The contrast is sharp, for instance, between the dreamy flights of the poetic prose in I, Bartleby (her prior book, marketed as a collection of short stories) and the curt, realist prose of U Girl, which exhibits great restraint in the writing and shows Quartermain’s flexibility and mastery of her craft.”
      Canadian Literature

Select a Market


Register

Step 1 of 2

Thanks for signing up! Please tell us a little about yourself.
* Indicates required field




Step 2 of 2

Forgotten Password

Please enter your email address and click submit. An email with instructions on resetting your password will be sent to you.

Forgotten Password

An email has been sent out with instructions for resetting your password.