Ampersand Fall 2016 Dewey Diva Picks Adult Books

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Great City Maps A Historical Journey Through Maps, Plans, and Paintings DK
    9781465453587 Hardcover REFERENCE / Atlases, Gazetteers & Maps On Sale Date: September 06, 2016
    $37.00 CAD 10.31 x 12.13 x 0.9 in | 256 pages Carton Quantity: 8 Canadian Rights: Y DK
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      Description

      A beautifully illustrated history of the world's most celebrated historical city maps, from the hubs of ancient civilization to sprawling modern mega-cities, created in association with the Smithsonian Institution.

      Great City Maps explores and explains 30 of the world's greatest historical city maps, providing a captivating overview of cartography through the ages. The book's unrivaled reproduction of these fascinating and intricate documents provides graphic close-ups and reveals more than just pure geography—it offers insight into the cultures and beliefs of the great civilizations that gave rise to them. From classical cities like Rome and Jerusalem to modern hubs like New York and Tokyo, the stories behind each map are revealed: why it was created, who it was intended for, and how it was achieved. Profiles of key cartographers, planners, and artists give even further insight into the history of each urban masterpiece.

      With its genuinely unique and superbly illustrated approach to the most celebrated city maps in history and its lavish textured and foiled jacket, Great City Maps is a beautiful piece to add to any collection and a must-have for all history and geography enthusiasts.

      Bio
      DK was founded in London in 1974 and is now the world's leading illustrated reference publisher and part of Penguin Random House, formed on July 1, 2013. DK publishes highly visual, photographic nonfiction for adults and children. DK produces content for consumers in over 87 countries and in 62 languages, with offices in Delhi, London, Melbourne, Munich, New York, and Toronto. DK's aim is to inform, enrich, and entertain readers of all ages, and everything DK publishes, whether print or digital, embodies the unique DK design approach. DK brings unrivalled clarity to a wide range of topics with a unique combination of words and pictures, put together to spectacular effect. We have a reputation for innovation in design for both print and digital products.   Our adult range spans travel, including the award-winning DK Eyewitness Travel Guides, history, science, nature, sport, gardening, cookery, and parenting. DK’s extensive children’s list showcases a fantastic store of information for children, toddlers, and babies. DK covers everything from animals and the human body, to homework help and craft activities, together with an impressive list of licensing titles, including the bestselling LEGO® books. DK acts as the parent company for Alpha Books, publisher of the Idiot's Guides series and Prima Games, video gaming publishers, as well as the award-winning travel publisher, Rough Guides.
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      Awards
      Reviews

      "A perfect companion to [DK]'s 2014 Great Maps, but also a worthwhile stand-alone purchase, especially where cartography books are needed that serve YA as well as adult patrons." — Library Journal (Starred Review)

      "Historic, colorful maps show how great cities evolve." — Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

  • 2
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    Big History Examines Our Past, Explains Our Present, Imagines Our Future DK, David Christian
    9781465454430 Hardcover SCIENCE / History On Sale Date: October 11, 2016
    $62.00 CAD 10.44 x 12.13 x 1.38 in | 440 pages Carton Quantity: 5 Canadian Rights: Y DK
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      Description

      Featuring a foreword by the father of Big History, David Christian, and produced in association with the Big History Institute, Big History provides a comprehensive understanding of the major events that have changed the nature and course of life on the planet we call home. This first fully integrated visual reference on Big History for general readers places humans in the context of our universe, from the Big Bang to virtual reality.

      Why does the universe work the way it does? Why are stars so big? Why are humans so small? What does it mean to be human? Big History blends geology, biology, physics, anthropology, sociology, and so much more to tell one coherent story, taking us right back to our origins and exploring how a unique series of events led to and then impacted human existence: how everything came to be, where we fit in, and even where we are going. Graphics, artworks, timelines, and at-a-glance overviews make the causes and effects of pivotal events and major thresholds in Big History instantly accessible, and evidence features explain how we know what we know. An additional 64-page reference section provides a more conventional account of events in human history.

      Placing humans in the context of our universe and revealing how and why we got to where we are today, Big History covers 13.8 billion years of history, from the formation of the universe and the dawn of time to the present day.

      Bio
      DK was founded in London in 1974 and is now the world's leading illustrated reference publisher and part of Penguin Random House, formed on July 1, 2013. DK publishes highly visual, photographic nonfiction for adults and children. DK produces content for consumers in over 87 countries and in 62 languages, with offices in Delhi, London, Melbourne, Munich, New York, and Toronto. DK's aim is to inform, enrich, and entertain readers of all ages, and everything DK publishes, whether print or digital, embodies the unique DK design approach. DK brings unrivalled clarity to a wide range of topics with a unique combination of words and pictures, put together to spectacular effect. We have a reputation for innovation in design for both print and digital products.   Our adult range spans travel, including the award-winning DK Eyewitness Travel Guides, history, science, nature, sport, gardening, cookery, and parenting. DK’s extensive children’s list showcases a fantastic store of information for children, toddlers, and babies. DK covers everything from animals and the human body, to homework help and craft activities, together with an impressive list of licensing titles, including the bestselling LEGO® books. DK acts as the parent company for Alpha Books, publisher of the Idiot's Guides series and Prima Games, video gaming publishers, as well as the award-winning travel publisher, Rough Guides.

      David Christian is the founder of Big History. He is also a distinguished professor at Macquarie University, cofounder, with Bill Gates, of the Big History Project, presenter of one of the 11 classic TED Talks with more than 6 million views, and instructor in the world's first Big History massive open online course (MOOC) on Coursera. David has given hundreds of presentations internationally, including at the Davos World Economic Forum in 2012, 2014, and 2015. He is a member of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and the Royal Holland Society of Sciences and Humanities, and a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Global History and the Cambridge World History.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Visual timelines and CGI reconstructions dive deeply into the major events that have changed planet Earth…" — Publishers Weekly

      "[A] visually engaging overview of history." — School Library Journal

  • 3
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    Cluck Lenore Rowntree Canada
    9781771871082 Paperback FICTION / Psychological Publication Date: October 01, 2016
    $19.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.5 in | 224 pages Carton Quantity: 36 Thistledown Press
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      Description

      Cluck is a darkly comic novel about Henry, an only child whose mother has bipolar disorder. As a teen, Henry becomes a radio junkie lost in the world of music. As a young man, he becomes obsessed with a female DJ whose evening show mysteriously beams out of Idaho and into his car while he’s driving over Vancouver’s Lions Gate Bridge. Henry has to live his life in the shadow cast by his mother, but he never completely gives up hope that he can find his place. Slowly, when he’s in his thirties, his life starts to open in positive directions, including sporadic success with chicken farming, outsider art (he calls himself a knit reactor), and romance. But, it’s not until Henry is in his fifties that his character is finally defined, but not without one final struggle with his own quirkiness.

      Bio

      Lenore Rowntree lives beside the heron rookery in Vancouver’s Stanley Park. She is excited Thistledown Press will publish her novel Cluck in 2016. Her short stories and poetry have appeared in several publications including Geist, Room Magazine, The New Quarterly, Other Voices, Exile Quarterly, The Tyee, Poet to Poet Anthology (Guernica Editions 2012), and The Best Canadian Poetry Anthology (Tightrope Books 2010). Her self-illustrated book of children’s poems Love Letters received a gold medal from the Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards in 2007. Her play The Woods at Tender Creek was produced at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (The Cultch) in 2010. She is a co-editor and contributor to the anthology of life stories Hidden Lives: Coming Out on Mental Illness (Brindle&Glass 2012), and most recently her collection of short stories Dovetail Joint was published in 2015 by Quadra Books.


      Lenore Rowntree lives beside the heron rookery in Vancouver’s Stanley Park. She is excited Thistledown Press will publish her novel Cluck in 2016. Her short stories and poetry have appeared in several publications including Geist, Room Magazine, The New Quarterly, Other Voices, Exile Quarterly, The Tyee, Poet to Poet Anthology (Guernica Editions 2012), and The Best Canadian Poetry Anthology (Tightrope Books 2010). Her self-illustrated book of children’s poems Love Letters received a gold medal from the Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards in 2007. Her play The Woods at Tender Creek was produced at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (The Cultch) in 2010. She is a co-editor and contributor to the anthology of life stories Hidden Lives: Coming Out on Mental Illness (Brindle&Glass 2012), and most recently her collection of short stories Dovetail Joint was published in 2015 by Quadra Books.

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  • 4
    catalogue cover
    9781988298009 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: September 24, 2016
    $21.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.7 in | 320 pages Carton Quantity: 18 Canadian Rights: Y Freehand Books
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      Description

      It's summer in Toronto, and the snow and ice are relentless. Too bad no one but Avery can see it.

      Avery Gauthier can't get far enough away from her past: the death of her beloved father, the abuse she suffered as a teen, and the religion that tore her parents apart. A reality-refugee, she's managed to keep the chaos of her former life at bay... until now.

      When her husband returns to the Jehovah's Witnesses, her estranged mother wants back in, and the snow (invisible to everyone but Avery) piles up and up and up, Avery is forced to face her greatest fears. She looks to the outside for help, to her mysterious superintendent and the comforts of a local weatherman, only to realize that the solutions lie where the problem does: within.

      A twisted, darkly funny and redemptive tale, The Weather Inside will leave you wondering where the line is drawn between what's real and what's imagined, and why Armageddon isn't always the end of the world.

      Bio

      Emily Saso writes fiction and screenplays. She lives in Toronto and blogs at egoburn.blogspot.ca. The Weather Inside is her debut novel.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "The Weather Inside is a mighty examination of faith and love. Saso masterfully shows why these are two different words. Gritty and heartfelt and hilarious in all the right places, this book is a gift for readers who are looking for something fresh." - Bradley Somer, author of Fishbowl

      "A debut novel that is both heartbreaking and hilarious. Emily Saso is a unique and daring new voice." - Rebecca Rosenblum, author of The Big Dream

  • 5
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    Series: Critical Studies in Native History
    Sounding Thunder The Stories of Francis Pegahmagabow Brian D. McInnes Canada, Waubgeshig Rice
    9780887558245 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date: September 09, 2016
    $24.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.6 in | 240 pages Carton Quantity: 24 University of Manitoba Press
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      Description
      Francis Pegahmagabow (1889–1952), a member of the Ojibwe nation, was born in Shawanaga, Ontario. Enlisting at the onset of the First World War, he became the most decorated Canadian Indigenous soldier for bravery and the most accomplished sniper in North American military history. After the war, Pegahmagabow settled in Wasauksing, Ontario. He served his community as both chief and councillor and belonged to the Brotherhood of Canadian Indians, an early national Indigenous political organization. Francis proudly served a term as Supreme Chief of the National Indian Government, retiring from office in 1950. Francis Pegahmagabow’s stories describe many parts of his life and are characterized by classic Ojibwe narrative. They reveal aspects of Francis’s Anishinaabe life and worldview. Interceding chapters by Brian McInnes provide valuable cultural, spiritual, linguistic, and historic insights that give a greater context and application for Francis’s words and world. Presented in their original Ojibwe as well as in English translation, the stories also reveal a rich and evocative relationship to the lands and waters of Georgian Bay. In "Sounding Thunder", Brian McInnes provides new perspective on Pegahmagabow and his experience through a unique synthesis of Ojibwe oral history, historical record, and Pegahmagabow family stories.
      Bio
      Brian D. McInnes is a faculty member in the Department of Education at the University of Minnesota Duluth. A member of the Wasauksing First Nation, Brian is a great-grandson of Francis Pegahmagabow.

      Waubgeshig Rice is an author and journalist originally from Wasauksing First Nation.
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      Awards
      Reviews
      “More than 20 years in the writing, Brian D. McInnes’s Sounding Thunder is an extraordinary book.”
      "Brings complexity and nuance to the story (or stories) of Francis Pegahmagabow’s life.”
      “This uniquely intimate portrait illuminates Francis’s commitment to live in a way that reflected the spiritual values of sharing and respect for life, despite his military record of 378 enemy kills for which he became renowned.”
      “The recognition of a remarkable Canadian and Nishinaabe hero alone makes this a worthy read. Perhaps more essential is the defense and persistence of Nishinaabe culture through the incorporation of language and stories in this book.”
      “We could all benefit from a lesson in the storytelling traditions of McInnes, Wasauksing, and the Ojibwe nation. I know I have. Do yourself a favour: buy this book. Read it, enjoy it, and learn.”
  • 6
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    Series: Indigenous Studies
    Violence Against Indigenous Women Literature, Activism, Resistance Allison Hargreaves Canada
    9781771122399 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Indigenous Studies Publication Date: August 24, 2017
    $29.99 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.5 in | 300 pages Carton Quantity: 33 Canadian Rights: Y Wilfrid Laurier University Press
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      Description

      Violence against Indigenous women in Canada is an ongoing crisis, with roots deep in the nation’s colonial history. Despite numerous policies and programs developed to address the issue, Indigenous women continue to be targeted for violence at disproportionate rates. What insights can literature contribute where dominant anti-violence initiatives have failed? Centring the voices of contemporary Indigenous women writers, this book argues for the important role that literature and storytelling can play in response to gendered colonial violence.

      Indigenous communities have been organizing against violence since newcomers first arrived, but the cases of missing and murdered women have only recently garnered broad public attention. Violence Against Indigenous Women joins the conversation by analyzing the socially interventionist work of Indigenous women poets, playwrights, filmmakers, and fiction-writers. Organized as a series of case studies that pair literary interventions with recent sites of activism and policy-critique, the book puts literature in dialogue with anti-violence debate to illuminate new pathways toward action.

      With the advent of provincial and national inquiries into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, a larger public conversation is now underway. Indigenous women’s literature is a critical site of knowledge-making and critique. Violence Against Indigenous Women provides a foundation for reading this literature in the context of Indigenous feminist scholarship and activism and the ongoing intellectual history of Indigenous women’s resistance.

      Bio
      Allison Hargreaves is a settler-scholar of Indigenous literatures and an assistant professor in the Department of Critical Studies at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, in unceded Syilx territory. Her research investigates literary interventions into gendered colonial violence in Canada, and has appeared in Studies in American Indian Literatures, Canadian Literature Quarterly, Canadian Woman Studies, and Canadian Theatre Review.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      ForeWord Indies Women's Studies 2017, Runner-up
      ACQL Gabrielle Roy Prize for Literary Criticism 2017, Winner
      Reviews
      “This book makes an important – indeed, urgent – contribution to knowledge about violence against Indigenous women that ought to become required reading for politicians, activists, policy-makers, scholars, writers, and artists engaged in responding to this ongoing crisis.”
      "Hargreaves ... examines how stories of individual tragedies have been memorialized in venues such as human rights reports, poems, films, and plays. She convincingly explains that statistics and research projects produced with the best intentions may serve to reinforce the very colonial power dynamics that prevent the emergence of transformative solutions in the struggle to end violence against Indigenous women. ... For those in the field of comparative narrative criticism, it’s a work sure to inspire much discussion, debate, and reflection."
      [Violence Against Indigenous Women] broadens how one sees and values Indigenous women, and it furthers personal consideration and propels actions as allies to avoid leaving the issue in the hands of institutions and governments. The lessons here will be most profound for non-Indigenous peoples. Summing Up: Highly recommended.
      Violence against Indigenous Women offers an in-depth look at the rhetorical relationship between federal policy, Indigenous literature, and community activism. Hargreaves draws on several case studies to discuss issues of mis- and underrepresentation, the decontextualizing of Indigenous narratives, and the resistance power of storytelling. This book would make a meaningful contribution to discussions of Indigenous rights, rhetorical power, feminist activism, gendered violence, and colonialism.
  • 7
    catalogue cover
    Series: Robert Kroetsch Series
    Ten Canadian Writers in Context Marie Carrière Canada, Curtis Gillespie, Jason Purcell Canada, Lynn Coady Canada, Ying Chen, Michael Crummey, Jennifer Delisle Canada, Kit Dobson Canada, Caterina Edwards, Marina Endicott, Lawrence Hill Canada, Daniel Laforest Canada, Alice Major Canada, Don Perkins, Julie Rodgers, Joseph Pivato, Eden Robinson Canada, Gregory Scofield, Winfried Siemerling Canada, Pamela Sing Canada, Maïté Snauwaert Canada, Kim Thúy, Angela Van Essen Canada
    9781772121414 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Canadian Publication Date: June 27, 2016
    $24.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.55 in | 216 pages Carton Quantity: 39 Canadian Rights: Y The University of Alberta Press
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      Description
      Ten years, ten authors, ten critics. The Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne reaches into its ten-year archive of Brown Bag Lunch readings to sample some of the most diverse and powerful voices in contemporary Canadian literature. This anthology offers readers samples from some of Canada’s most exciting writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Each selection is introduced by a brief essay, serving as a point of entry into the writer’s work. From the east coast of Newfoundland to Kitamaat territory on British Columbia’s central coast, there is a story for everyone, from everywhere. True to Canada’s multilingual and multicultural heritage, these ten writers come from diverse ethnicities and backgrounds, and work in multiple languages, including English, French, and Cree. Ying Chen | essay by Julie Rodgers Lynn Coady | essay by Maïté Snauwaert Michael Crummey | essay by Jennifer Bowering Delisle Caterina Edwards | essay by Joseph Pivato Marina Endicott | essay by Daniel Laforest Lawrence Hill | essay by Winfried Siemerling Alice Major | essay by Don Perkins Eden Robinson | essay by Kit Dobson Gregory Scofield | essay by Angela Van Essen Kim Thúy | essay by Pamela V. Sing
      Bio
      Marie Carrière is the Director of the Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne and teaches French, English, and Comparative Literature at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on contemporary women's writing and the theory and history of feminism.

      Curtis Gillespie is the author of five books, including the memoirs Almost There and Playing Through and the novel Crown Shyness. He has won or been nominated for a variety of awards for his books including the Danuta Gleed Award, the Henry Kreisel Award and the MacEwan Prize. He is the recipient of seven National Magazine Awards from twenty nominations for his writing on science, politics, sports, travel and the arts, including a record-tying four awards in 2014. In 2010, he co-founded the narrative journalism magazine Eighteen Bridges, which he also edits. In addition to his own writing, he has worked with many of Canada’s best writers as an editor, teacher and mentor at the University of Alberta, the Banff Centre for the Arts and Eighteen Bridges.

      Jason Purcell is a graduate student at the University of Alberta in the Department of English and Film Studies. He is the Communications Officer for the Canadian Literature Centre/ Centre de littérature canadienne at the University of Alberta, the Circulation Coordinator for Eighteen Bridges magazine, and the Manuscript Coordinator at NeWest Press.

      Lynn Coady is an award-wining author and journalist. Her first novel, Strange Heaven, was nominated for the Governor General's Award, and in 2011, her novel The Antagonist was shortlisted for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize, an award she won in 2013 for her short story collection Hellgoing. Coady lives in Toronto, where she writes for television.

      Ying Chen left her native Shanghai and settled in Montreal in 1991. Her first novel, La mémoire de l’eau was published by Leméac in 1992. Subsequent novels include the award-winning Les Lettres chinoises (Leméac, 1993); L’ingratitude (Leméac, 1995), Immobile (Boréal, 1998) which won the Prix Alfred-DesRochers 1999), Un enfant à ma porte (Boréal, 2008) and La rive est loin (Boréal, 2013). Chen lives in Vancouver.

      Michael Crummey is a poet, novelist, and short story writer from Newfoundland. His first novels, River Thieves (Doubleday, 2001) and The Wreckage (Doubleday, 2005) were each finalists for various prestigious literary awards. His third, Galore (Doubleday, 2009), won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book. His most recent novel Sweetland (Doubleday, 2014) was released in August.



      Kit Dobson is an Associate Professor of English at Mount Royal University. He teaches and publishes in the areas of Canadian literature, film, and globalization studies.

      Caterina Edwards’ latest book, a work of creative non-fiction, Finding Rosa: A Mother with Alzheimer’s/ A Daughter’s Search for the Past (Greystone 2008), won the 2009 Wilfrid Eggleston Award for Nonfiction. The Island of the Nightingales (Guernica 2000) won the Writers Guild of Alberta Award for Short Fiction. She has co-edited two books of life writing by women.

      Marina Endicott worked as an actor and director in Toronto and in England. She published her first novel, Open Arms (Douglas & McIntyre), in 2001. Good to a Fault (Freehand Books 2008) won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book, Canada/Caribbean region. The Little Shadows (Doubleday 2011) was nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Endicott also co-wrote the screenplay for the documentary film Vanishing Point, released in 2012.

      Lawrence Hill is an award-winning novelist and memorist. The Book of Negroes (HarperCollins Canada, 2007), Hill’s most recent and successful novel, won numerous awards. He is the author of the bestselling memoir, Black Berry, Sweet Juice: On Being Black and White in Canada (2001). In 2013, Hill delivered the annual Massey Lecture, published by House of Anansi as Blood: The Stuff of Life.

      Daniel Laforest is Associate Professor at the University of Alberta where he teaches Quebec and Canadian literatures, as well as French literature, cultural studies and critical theory. He has been Fulbright fellow at the Centre for Cultural Studies of the University of California Santa Cruz. He serves as associate editor for the academic journal Canadian Literature.

      Alice Major emigrated from Scotland at the age of eight, and grew up in Toronto before coming west to work as a weekly newspaper reporter. She served as the City of Edmonton’s first poet laureate from 2005–2007. A widely-published author, she has won many distinctions. Her most recent book, Intersecting Sets: A Poet Looks at Science, received the Wilfrid Eggleston Award for non-fiction as well as a National Magazine Award gold medal. Her website is www.alicemajor.com.

      Don Perkins is a lecturer in the department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta, and has also taught for the Drama department and the Faculty of Native Studies. He teaches and publishes in the areas of non-fiction writing, Canadian drama, popular culture, literature and history, and Native literature.

      Julie Rodgers is a lecturer in French at Maynooth University, Ireland. She teaches and publishes on contemporary women’s writing and film in French. She has published two articles on Ying Chen to-date, with a third forthcoming in a special issue of Quebec Studies in 2015.

      Joseph J. Pivato is a professor of Literary Studies in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Athabasca University. He is the founding professor of the Master of Arts Integrated Studies program. His research has helped to establish the academic recognition of ethnic minority writing in Canada, particularly the Italian-Canadian literature.

      Eden Robinson is the internationally acclaimed author of Traplines, Monkey Beach, and Blood Sports. Traplines was the winner of the New York Times Notable Book of the Year and Britain's Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize. Monkey Beach was nominated for the Giller Prize, the 2000 Governor General's Award for Fiction, and was selected as the Globe and Mail's Editor's Choice. Robinson is a member of the Haisla and Heiltsuk First Nations.

      Gregory Scofield is one of Canada’s most renowned Aboriginal writers, whose collections include kipocihkân: Poems New & Selected, I Knew Two Metis Women, and Love Medicine and One Song. His unique style blends oral storytelling, song, spoken word and the Cree language. His poetry and memoir, Thunder Through My Veins (1999), is widely taught across Canada and the U.S.

      Winfried Siemerling is a professor in the department of English Language and Literature at the University of Waterloo. His current research includes African Canadian writing, literary history, and the presence of the past. He is co-researcher of "International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation: A Partnered Research Institute," funded by the SSHRC Partnership Grant.

      Pamela V. Sing is Director of the Institut d’études canadiennes/Institute of Canadian Studies at Campus Saint-Jean, the University of Alberta’s francophone campus, and Associate Director of the Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne at the University of Alberta. She teaches French, Québec, and Franco-Canadian literature at Campus Saint-Jean and is the co-editor of Impenser la francophonie: Recherches, renouvellement, diversité, identité with Estelle Dansereau (Campus Saint-Jean, 2012). Her research focuses on Franco-Canadian and Québécois writers, as well as Canadian and American writers of Franco-Métis ancestry.

      Maïté Snauwaert holds a PhD in French Literature from Université Paris 8. In Canada since 2004, she has been a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre de recherche sur le texte et l’imaginaire Figura at the Université du Québec à Montréal, at the CRILCQ/Université de Montréal, and at McGill University (Marie-Thérèse Reverchon scholarship). She is an assistant professor at the Campus Saint-Jean, University of Alberta.

      Kim Thúy’s first novel Ru was published in French (Libre Expression, 2009) and translated into English by Sheila Fischman (Random House of Canada, 2012), winning numerous awards within Canada and abroad. The English translation was also nominated for prestigious prizes. Thúy’s second novel, Mãn (Libre expression, 2013) garnered critical acclaim and was translated into English by Sheila Fischman in 2014 (Random House of Canada). She lives in Montreal, Quebec.

      Angela Van Essen is a PhD candidate in the English and Film Studies department at the University of Alberta where she is writing a dissertation on contemporary Cree bilingual literature. She has taught English courses at The King’s University and at the University of Alberta and published on Indigenous writers in Canada.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Independent Publisher Awards, Anthology 2017, Runner-up
      Reviews
      #6 on the Edmonton Journal's Non-fiction Bestsellers list for the week of October 28, 2016 The Edmonton Journal
      "...the collection is ideal for students and teachers of Canadian Literature at the high school or undergraduate levels, but would also be a useful resource for any active, engaged reader.... Overall, it imparts the impression of a vibrant, lively Canadian literature ranging widely in interests and preoccupations. The editors have been careful to select a diverse range of writers.... The net impact of this slim volume is to force a reconsideration of who in the world of Canadian literature is canonical and worthy of sustained, thoughtful examination. Every writer selected lives up to this standard.... [the] collection functions as something of a sampler pack of some of the most interesting writers working in Canada today."
  • 8
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    The Case of Alan Turing The Extraordinary and Tragic Story of the Legendary Codebreaker Eric Liberge, Arnaud Delalande, David Homel Canada
    9781551526508 Board book COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Nonfiction Publication Date: September 01, 2016
    $23.95 CAD 9 x 12 x 0.44 in | 102 pages Carton Quantity: 15 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
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      Description

      Lambda Literary Award finalist

      Alan Turing, subject of the Oscar-winning 2014 film The Imitation Game, was the brilliant mathematician solicited by the British government to help decipher messages sent by Germany's Enigma machines during World War II. The work of Turing and his colleagues at Hut 8 saved countless lives and millions' worth of British goods and merchandise.

      At the same time, as a homosexual he was forced to lead a tortured, secret life. After a young man stole money from him, he went to the police, where he confessed his homosexuality; he was charged with gross indecency and only avoided prison after agreeing to undergo chemical castration. Tragically, he committed suicide two years later.

      The particulars of Turing's achievements were only made known in 2012, following the release of once-classified papers. Authors Liberge and Delalande used this information to create a graphic biography that is scientifically rigorous yet understandable for the lay reader.

      Delving deeper into Turing's life than The Imitation Game, this graphic work is an intimate portrayal of a brilliant gay man living in an intolerant world.

      Bio

      Eric Liberge has authored or co-authored over thirty graphic novels in his native France, including books on Versailles and World War II, as well as numerous books in the fantasy genre.



      Arnaud Delalande is the author of nine novels as well as numerous graphic novels in France, including Le Piege de Dante (Dante's Trap), translated into twenty languages. His prizes include le Prix du Roman d'Evasion and le Prix Charles-Oulmont de la Fondation de France.



      David Homel is a writer, journalist, filmmaker, and translator, and the author of seven novels. He has translated many French-language books into English and is a two-time recipient of the Governor General's Literary Award for Translation. He lives in Montreal.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Lambda Literary Award 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews
      As so often happens when a historical figure becomes a pop icon, something gets left out in the process, and forcing Turing's life into the familiar mold of the tortured genius is reductive and misleading. This new graphic novel offers a fuller portrait of Turing as a human being while also honoring his many intellectual accomplishments.
      -Popmatters.com
      The presentation of Turing as towering intellect harrowed by guilt and despair gestures toward some of the best examples of the American comic book, particularly the self doubting, dark super heroes of the Marvel comics. Think of this character, and this book, as an implausible but nonetheless successful blend of Batman and Crime and Crime and Punishment's Raskolnikov. -Vancouver Sun
      Arnaud Delalande succeeded in making me care for Turing beyond his well known accomplishments. And Eric Liberge's art throughout is an absolute marvel for the eyes. -Gay League
      An eminently readable book that's pleasantly informative, even philosophically edifying. -subTerrain
  • 9
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    The Dad Dialogues A Correspondence on Fatherhood (and the Universe) George Bowering Canada, Charles Demers Canada
    9781551526621 Paperback FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Parenting Publication Date: October 01, 2016
    $17.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.66 in | 240 pages Carton Quantity: 36 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Charles Demers is a thirtysomething comedian and the author of three books; George Bowering is eighty, Canada's first poet laureate, and the author of more than eighty books. Charlie and George are also the best of friends. And the fathers of daughters.

      In this unique book of correspondence, these two men from different generations write to each other about the burdens, anxieties, and singular joys of parenthood. The letters begin as Charlie and his wife discover they will become parents; he expresses his hopes and fears of impending fatherhood, compounded by his OCD and his own father's illness, while George recalls his experiences raising a daughter in the 1970s and his anxieties about bringing a child into a troubled world.

      Together, their thoughtful, funny, candid missives reveal what fathers know (or don't know) about raising daughters, as well as themselves and each other. Their combined observations make for a passionate, funny, and moving portrait of fatherhood in all its imperfect, beautiful glory.

      Bio

      George Bowering is Canada's first poet laureate and an officer of the Order of Canada. He is the author of more than eighty books, the most recent of which include The Hockey Scribbler, Writing the Okanagan, and 10 Women. A native of British Columbia, he lives in Vancouver.



      Charles Demers is a comedian, writer, and playwright, and the author of the novels Property Values (Arsenal Pulp Press) and The Prescription Errors (Insomniac Press), and the non-fiction books The Horrors (Douglas & McIntyre), Vancouver Special (Arsenal Pulp Press, now out of print), and (with George Bowering) The Dad Dialogues (Arsenal Pulp Press). He's a regular on CBC's The Debaters and is the voice of Walter the Slug on the Emmy-winning Netflix cartoon Beat Bugs. He is also the editor of Robin's Egg Books, a humour imprint of Arsenal Pulp Press. A longtime political activist, he lives in East Vancouver with his wife and daughter.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      A thoughtful, amusing book which should spark a lot of conversations about fathering, daughters, housework and diapers. -Vancouver Sun
      Confident and amusing, poignant and thoughtful ... Strong undercurrents--of dread, anxiety, and fear--contribute the sense that funny episodes aside, parenting isn't for the faint of heart.
      -Macleans
      An engagingly written look at fatherhood. Despite an almost fifty year age difference, Charles and George align on most aspects of what it's like to be a father, how marriage gets affected, and what babies are really like.
      -The Ormsby Review
  • 10
    catalogue cover
    Niagara Motel Ashley Little Canada
    9781551526607 Paperback FICTION / Coming of Age Publication Date: September 27, 2016
    $17.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.69 in | 260 pages Carton Quantity: 33 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize finalist

      Set in the early 1990s, Ashley Little's follow-up to her award-winning novel Anatomy of a Girl Gang introduces readers to unforgettable eleven-year-old Tucker Malone--the only child of a narcoleptic touring stripper--who believes his father is Sam Malone from Cheers. He and his mother move from motel to motel until, one night in Niagara Falls, his mother is hit by a car after falling asleep in the street.

      Tucker is sent to live in a youth group home where he meets Meredith, a pregnant sixteen-year-old with more than her fair share of family problems. They bond over slurpees and a shared love for literature and he convinces her to "borrow" a car to go to Boston to find his father.

      Their cross-country search becomes an epic depiction of mid-90s America as Tucker comes face to face with some of the most notorious criminals of the time: The Oklahoma Bomber; Lorena Bobbitt; the boys responsible for the Columbine High School massacrew; O.J. Simpson; and Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka.

      Told in spare, straightforward prose, Niagara Motel is a biting chronicle during the rise of mass-media in the decade that defined the MTV Generation, and the bittersweet story of a young boy forced to learn brutal lessons on his way to becoming a man.

      Bio

      Ashley Little's Anatomy of a Girl Gang won the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize (BC Book Prizes), was shortlisted for the Vancouver Book Award, and was longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Her follow-up novel Niagara Motel was shortlisted for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. Her young adult novel The New Normal (Orca) won the Sheila A. Egoff Children's Literature Prize. She has an MFA from the University of British Columbia. She lives in the Okanagan Valley.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Ethel Wilson Ficton Prize 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews
      Tucker's a charmer from the get-go -- funny and wise and knowing and clueless -- the best companion you could have on this road trip across the early 90s, where the real and the outlandish blur and commingle. Like summer blacktop, like a desert mirage, Niagara Motel shimmers. -Anne Fleming, author of Gay Dwarves of America
      Sharp, sly, and full of feeling. Catcher in the Rye crashes into the 1990s. A voice and a story you won't be able to shake. -Alix Hawley, author of All True Not a Lie in It
      A dark, fearless portrait of an adolescence lived in less than ideal circumstances. Told with a balanced touch of humour and tragedy, Niagara Motel is as heartbreaking as it is hilarious. -Michael Christie, author of If I Fall, If I Die
      Part Huck Finn, part Natural Born Killers, Niagara Motel re-animates fin de siecle North America in all its surreal, gaudy wonder. Through the force of Tucker's voice -- preternaturally trusting, quasi-beatific -- we enter a liminal world of celebrity criminals, tourist attractions, and social anomie at once familiar and strange, at once the recent past and an allegory for the adolescent years of this century. Ashley Little can make you believe everything. -Matt Rader, author of Desecrations
      Tucker's the heart of this improbable series of events. An innocent in a tough and corrupt world, his generous narration -- the voice, the sense-making, the insight -- is the great drawing card of Little's novel. He's plucky and determined and, despite circumstances, refreshingly unmarred.
      -Vancouver Sun

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