Ampersand The Great Write North

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Hellgoing Lynn Coady Canada
    9781770893085 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date: July 27, 2013
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8 in | 0.62 lb | 240 pages Carton Quantity: 48 Canadian Rights: Y Astoria
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Winner of the 2013 Scotiabank Giller Prize.

      Shortlisted for the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize. Selected as an Amazon.ca Best Book and for The Globe's Top 10 Books of 2013.

      With astonishing range and depth, Scotiabank Giller Prize winner Lynn Coady gives us nine unforgettable new stories, each one of them grabbing our attention from the first line and resonating long after the last.

      A young nun charged with talking an anorexic out of her religious fanaticism toys with the thin distance between practicality and blasphemy. A strange bond between a teacher and a schoolgirl takes on ever deeper, and stranger, shapes as the years progress. A bride-to-be with a penchant for nocturnal bondage can’t seem to stop bashing herself up in the light of day.

      Equally adept at capturing the foibles and obsessions of men and of women, compassionate in her humour yet never missing an opportunity to make her characters squirm, fascinated as much by faithlessness as by faith, Lynn Coady is quite possibly the writer who best captures what it is to be human at this particular moment in our history.

      Bio

      LYNN COADY is the critically acclaimed and award-winning author of six books, including Hellgoing, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize, was a finalist for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and was an Amazon.ca and Globe and Mail Best Book. She is also the author of The Antagonist, winner of the Georges Bugnet Award for Fiction and a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her first novel, Strange Heaven, published when she was just twenty-eight, was a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award. Her books have been published in the U.K., U.S., Holland, France, and Germany. Coady lives in Toronto and writes for television.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2013, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2013, Winner
      Amazon.ca Best Books: Editors' Picks 2013, Commended
      Globe and Mail Top 10 Books 2013, Commended
      Reviews
      This is story on the verge of exceeding its narrative boundaries, and these moments are some of the most exciting in Coady’s work to date.
      A sharp, insightful writer with a tight, jarring style that makes use of fast narrative cuts, Coady deliberately leaves the human scribble tangled. This isn’t out of a desire to play coy, but rather an admission that problems involving relationships don’t have easy resolutions that can be clearly expressed.
      Since 1998’s Strange Heaven, her Governor General’s Award–nominated debut novel, Coady has harmonized humour and heart in prose that rings true. Hellgoing provides another reminder that her use of wit is consummate, and her regard for the reader is gracious.
      …brilliant collection of short stories…
      Hellgoing is hell going…Coady is a muscular writer, who drives us right smack into the situation her characters are experiencing… Coady’s stories are not about commonalities as such. They are unique.
      Hellgoing is a superb collection, end to end, and easily one of the best books I’ve read so far in 2013.
      Toting their trauma, Coady’s characters repel these attacks from fathers, doctors, lovers and the legion of others that ‘know best’ by learning “to hurt and insult him as effortlessly as he did me.” This rebellion lets Coady’s wicked wit shine, and while compassion from the reader is complicated by this attitude, Coady always delivers a knockout punch at the end of each story,“ like picking at your cuticles and being surprised when they start to ache and bleed.
      One of the hallmarks of Lynn Coady's work is her shrewd examination of the underexplored byways of human psychology. Coady is a writer who increasingly commands attention and respect
      It is the author's demonstrable strength as an ironist that prevents these stories- and these characters from appearing completely hopeless. [Coady's] sharp sense of humour serves to humanize even the most vicious or clueless figures in the book. There is searing honesty here about humankind's inability, or unwillingness, to make an effort at connection, but the author's own humanity rescues her vision from descending into despair or nihlism.
      ...powerful...
      Coady’s Giller-winning book of stories ranges wildly in style and content, but taken as a whole is an ideal introduction to one of Canada’s finest writers.
      ...a damned good read.
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Savage Love Paperback Douglas Glover Canada
    9780864928511 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: September 23, 2014
    $19.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.62 in | 241 gr | 264 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Goose Lane Editions
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The Globe and Mail Top 100
      Quill & Quire Book of the Year
      Amazon.ca Editors' Pick, Top 100
      Now magazine, Top 10 Books
      Chatelaine, Favourite Books of 2013

      "This was, hands down, the best book I read in 2013." — Steven W. Beattie,The National Post

      The return of Douglas Glover, one of Canada's most lauded and brilliant authors.

      "Douglas Glover, the mad genius of Can Lit." — Caroline Adderson, The Globe and Mail

      Savage Love shatters then transforms every conventional notion we've ever held about that cultural-emotional institution we call love.

      "The most stylish, adventurous fiction this country has ever seen." — Quill & Quire

      Absurd, comic, dream-like and deeply affecting, Glover's stories are of our time yet timeless, spectacular fables that stand in any era, any civilization.

      "Eclectic and obsessive, abrasive and majestic." — Los Angeles Review of Books

      Savage Love exposes the humanity lurking behind our masks, the perversities that underlie our actions. This is Douglas Glover country, and we are all willing visitors.

      Bio
      Douglas Glover was recipient of the 2006 Writers' Trust of Canada Timothy Findley Award for his body of work. His bestselling novel Elle won the Governor-General's Award and was a finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. A Guide to Animal Behaviour was a finalist for the 1991 Governor-General's Award, and 16 Categories of Desire was shortlisted for the 2000 Rogers Writers Trust Fiction Award.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Amazon.ca Best Book of 2013 2013, Joint winner
      Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award 2013, Long-listed
      Globe and Mail Top 100 from 2013 2013, Joint winner
      Quill & Quire Best Book of 2013 2013, Joint winner
      Reviews
      "An exciting and unpredictable collection by a true virtuoso."
      "Glover's collection is bracing, angry, violent and funny. It is, regardless of genre, one of the best books you will read this year."
      "Stories as radiant and stirring as anything available in contemporary literature."
      "Glover writes the best way possible: fiercely, idiosyncratically and lovingly.... Douglas Glover, the mad genius of CanLit."
      "Glover's œuvre...demands comparison to McCarthy, Barry Hannah, Donald Barthelme, William Faulkner. He challenges readers to enter winding caves of mystery, not in search of answers, but in search of experience."
      "Love as you have never seen it before."
      "Savage Love is an accomplished, funny, and inventive book that readers should rejoice in... By any measure, Savage Love deserves to be recognized as one of the best Canadian books published this year."
      "Not for the timid, this gut-wrenching collection of physically and emotionally charged fiction lives up to the outstanding reputation that Glover has attained. His distinctive voice may echo into the next century and beyond."
      "Savage Love provides more evidence: nobody alive constructs more perfect stories than Douglas Glover. His art is exquisite, conclusive, stainless — but also wide-awake and breathing. That is to say, he's no mere craftsman. In Savage Love, he manages somehow to be both Geppetto and the magic life-giving kiss."
      "What unifies this collection is the characteristic excellence of Douglas Glover's prose. Otherwise the books is hugely, even shockingly varied in its narrative strategies, its settings, its tones, and its characters, who range from broadly comic figures to a killer so warped by war that he makes the psychotic Judge in Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian look benign. This book is urgent, ardent, obsessive, and remarkable."
      "I, your admiring reader, report myself ever again restored to find in hand the company of your righteous sentences, shout hooray, shout hooray, even splendid, splendid, splendid (borrowing from the great poet Jack Gilbert), like loins, he wrote, like Rome, he wrote.... "
      "The stories in Savage Love...were a revelation...relieved by moments of sardonic humour, as well as by the skill with which the stories are told.... If you have not read Douglas Glover before, I recommend you do."
      "[S]urprising, shattering, wickedly absurd tales rife with parenthetical, fourth-wall-breaking asides and understated cynicism... Savage Love remains one of the strongest, most refreshing short fiction collections of 2013."
      "Douglas Glover always pushes the envelope. Every story in Savage Love is outrageous, creating farce #&8212; and something beautiful — out of human foibles.... Some paragraphs are so gorgeously vivid, I wanted to read them twice.... This is the kind of audacious work our literary juries should be acknowledging."
      "Glover's sentences pulse and breathe, seethe and spit; his stories avoid prefab emotion in favour of bracing, often brutal honesty. For the courageous, there was no better collection of stories pubilshed this year."
      "Savage Love by Douglas Glover is a perfect collection of short stories for people knowing the world isn't a fairy tale. The stories are rough and frank but brutally honest about the concept of human relations."
      "One of Canada's best writers, Glover returns with a brilliant story collection displaying his considerable range and remarkably varied writerly gifts." — The Globe Books 100: Best Canadian fiction
      "A Douglas Glover short story is like a 10-day journey by Soviet-era jeep over a nation's back roads — head-spinning and breathtaking. Its outcome is enlightening, sickening or utterly confusing, depending on which country he's taken you to.... The best stories in Savage Love...inspire you to seize love by the heart and genitals, consequences be damned.... The frenetic chaos of Glover's writing gets richer as the stories go on, taking us deeper into the desires that fuel love in all its perversions."
      "[A] compact gallery, flint-eyed and snaggle-toothed, of wolfish behaviour; it's also a casebook study in narrative design...the stories smoulder and luminesce with vitiated heat, modulated light....For all its antic form and interpersonal dysfunction, Savage Love remains somehow low key: a quietly virtuosic, artistically backward-looking story collection. Both eclectic and obsessive, abrasive and majestic, it might also be the best novel written anywhere this year....Savage Love is Glover's fifth collection of short stories, and it confirms his longstanding mastery of the genre."
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Caught Lisa Moore Canada
    9781770894532 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: February 04, 2014
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8 in | 0.76 lb | 328 pages Carton Quantity: 36 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Selected as an Amazon.ca Best Book and for The Globe 100 Books in 2013.

      Now available in paperback, internationally acclaimed author Lisa Moore offers us a remarkable novel about a man who escapes from prison to embark upon one of the most ambitious pot-smuggling adventures ever attempted.

      It’s June, 1978, and David Slaney can be sure of only one thing. He can’t get caught; not this time. He’s escaped from prison and has got to make good on the heist that went wrong, win back the woman he loves, and make a big enough profit to buy himself a new life. First, though, he must get himself across a vast country full of watchful eyes, booby traps, and friends who might be foes.

      Here are bravado and betrayal, bad weather and worse seas, love, lust, undercover agents, the collusion of governments, innocence and the loss thereof, and many, many bales of marijuana. Here, too, is the seeming invincibility of youth and all the folly that it allows.

      Caught is exuberant, relentlessly suspenseful, and utterly unique — an adventure novel the way only Lisa Moore could write it.

      Bio

      Lisa Moore is the acclaimed author of the novels Caught, February, and Alligator. Caught was a finalist for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Scotiabank Giller Prize and is now a major CBC television series starring Allan Hawco. February won CBC’s Canada Reads competition, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and was named a New Yorker Best Book of the Year and a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book. Alligator was a finalist for the Scotia Bank Giller Prize, won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Canada and the Caribbean region), and was a national bestseller. Her story collection Open was a finalist for the Scotia Bank Giller Prize and a national bestseller. Her most recent work is a collection of short stories called Something for Everyone. Lisa lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2013, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2013, Short-listed
      Quill & Quire Books of the Year: Fiction 2013, Commended
      Globe and Mail Top 100 Books 2013, Commended
      Amazon.ca Best Books: Editors' Picks 2013, Commended
      Reviews
      Even we, as readers, will be caught by the timbre and skill of Moore’s storytelling and her careful sculpting of characters.
      With linguistic verve and a magnified curiosity about whatever passes through her field of vision, Moore elevates the cops-and-robbers subgenre to literary respectability.
      In the creation of David Slaney, Lisa Moore brings us an unforgettable character, embodying the exuberance and energy of misspent youth. Caught is a propulsive and harrowing read.
      Caught is an outstanding novel, combining the complexity of the best literary fiction with the page-turning compulsive readability of a thriller.
      [Lisa Moore’s] written a new kind of legend for a new Newfoundland.
      [T]his novel that is rife with realness, and beauty, and tension; so much it hurts, in the best possible way.
      Moore’s prose is as vivid as ever...
      …precise, compressed, intimately rhythmic, mesmerizingly smart.
      Lisa Moore’s new book is a beautiful piece of writing…
      ...Caught proceeds like a lit fuse.
      As trippy, mellow, and revelatory as Hearn’s weed, Caught takes pleasure from rewriting crime formulas and gives pleasure in doing so.
      There is so much more to praise Moore for. The novel is rich with her subtle injections of humour, her careful pacing, and her clear yet coarse dialogue that leaves just enough unsaid. Of course, it also lives up to the ultimate test of a thriller – there is no doubt that this is a page-turner.
      …in Caught Moore has clearly set out to challenge the conventions of crime writing.
      ...witty, retrospective, eloquent and exciting. Moore has crafted an old-timey adventure with good guys and bad guys — who are also one in the same.
      This is an author who grips you with her impeccable use of language. The novel walks a great line between paperback levity and psychological intelligence—exactly what you want in a summer read.
      …sharp lines, seedy characters and the kind of can’t-put-it-down suspense you might expect from a dime store detective novel but with Lisa Moore-level construction, detail and meticulous prose. This isn’t Moore slumming it in suspense fiction—but genre elevation…
      The reader can only marvel at the precision of Moore's obervations.
      ...Moore’s Caught is a fantastic read. It’s a rapid ride, with a strong current of tension that never lets up.
      A superbly written novel that crosses literary boundaries, Caught will surely garner [Moore] even wider readership.
      Caught is a pleasure to read. The narrative is cohesive and propulsive, but it’s Moore’s mastery of language and image that sets her apart.
      Moore's ability to conceal a drum-tight plot line and an unflagging fidelity to the thematic pillars of Caught—mistakes and luck, trust and doubt, consequences and freedom—in the cloak of rough-and-tumble prose is something to behold.
  • 4
    catalogue cover
    Series: Word Cloud Classics
    Anne of Green Gables 1st Edition Lucy Maud Montgomery
    9781607107286 Paperback FICTION / Coming of Age Publication Date: April 01, 2013
    $19.99 CAD 127 x 190.5 x 20.32 mm | 0.79 lb | 264 pages Carton Quantity: 12 Canadian Rights: Y Canterbury Classics
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      One of the most charming and enduring coming-of-age tales!

      Best-selling Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery published the first book in her charming series in 1908, making it a literary favorite for more than a hundred years. Published as a children's novel, the story of Anne Shirley, an orphan, was inspired by the author's childhood adventures on rural Prince Edward Island. It follows Anne's journey as she moves to a farm on Prince Edward Island to live with a middle-aged brother and sister who had intended to adopt a boy to help them with farming chores. The story follows Anne as she makes a home and comes of age on the island.



      * This chic and inexpensive edition comes with a heat-burnished cover, foil stamping, luxurious endpapers, and a smaller trim size that's easy to hold.
      * The widely popular novel has sold more than 50 million copies and has been translated into more than twenty languages since its first publication.



      Anne of Green Gables has been one of the world's most charming coming-of-age stories for more than a century.



      About the Word Cloud Classics series:

      Classic works of literature with a clean, modern aesthetic! Perfect for both old and new literature fans, the Word Cloud Classics series from Canterbury Classics provides a chic and inexpensive introduction to timeless tales. With a higher production value, including heat burnished covers and foil stamping, these eye-catching, easy-to-hold editions are the perfect gift for students and fans of literature everywhere.
      Bio
      Lucy Maud Montgomery (November 30, 1874 – April 24, 1942), was a Canadian author best known for her series of novels beginning with Anne of Green Gables, which was an immediate success. The first novel was followed by a series of sequels with Anne as the central character. Montgomery went on to publish 20 novels as well as 500 short stories and poems. She was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada.
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  • 5
    catalogue cover
    9781770899421 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: August 27, 2016
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8 x 0.9 in | 440 gr | 424 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      National Bestseller

      2016 Scotiabank Giller Prize finalist

      National Post 99 Best Books of the Year

      Indigo Best Book of the Year

      Globe and Mail Best 100 Books of 2016

      What if someone you trusted was accused of the unthinkable?

      George Woodbury, an affable teacher and beloved husband and father, is arrested for sexual impropriety at a prestigious prep school. His wife, Joan, vaults between denial and rage as the community she loved turns on her. Their daughter, Sadie, a popular over-achieving high school senior, becomes a social pariah. Their son, Andrew, assists in his father’s defense, while wrestling with his own unhappy memories of his teen years. A local author tries to exploit their story, while an unlikely men’s rights activist attempts to get Sadie onside their cause. With George locked up, how do the members of his family pick up the pieces and keep living their lives? How do they defend someone they love while wrestling with the possibility of his guilt?

      With exquisite emotional precision, award-winning author Zoe Whittall explores issues of loyalty, truth, and the meaning of happiness through the lens of an all-American family on the brink of collapse.

      Bio

      Zoe Whittall’s third novel, The Best Kind of People, was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, was named Indigo’s #1 Book of 2016, and is being adapted for film by director Sarah Polley. Whittall won a 2018 Canadian Screen Award for Best Writing in a Variety or Sketch Comedy Program with the team from The Baroness von Sketch Show. She has also written for Schitt's Creek, among other shows. Her second novel, Holding Still for as Long as Possible, won a Lambda Literary Award, and her first novel, Bottle Rocket Hearts, is now being adapted into a limited series for television. Her short fiction and arts criticism have appeared in Granta, The Walrus, the Believer, Cosmonauts, Hazlitt, and others, and she has published three volumes of poetry.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2016, Short-listed
      Reviews

      PRAISE FOR THE BEST KIND OF PEOPLE (2016)

      NATIONAL BESTSELLER
      SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE FINALIST
      NATIONAL POST 99 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
      INDIGO BOOK OF THE YEAR
      AN INDIGO BEST BOOK OF THE DECADE
      GLOBE AND MAIL BEST 100 BOOKS OF 2016

      “Heartbreaking and complex, The Best Kind of People offers no easy answers. This is a masterly exploration of the damage an entire community incurs when the secret at the heart of its most perfect family detonates.” — Lynn Coady author of The Antagonist

      The Best Kind of People examines the effects of rape culture on an entire community with rare nuance and insight. Every character is fully rounded, flawed, and achingly human. It puts me in mind of a twenty-first-century Ordinary People — which, for the record, is one of my favourite novels.” — Kate Harding, author of Asking For It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture — and What We Can Do About It

      “With incredibly rare nuance, sensitivity, and insight, Zoe Whittall takes us deep into our contemporary conversation around sexual violence and shines a vital spotlight on the individuals and communities that live in its long shadow. Whittall’s undisputed talent as a writer shines, as does her understanding into the complexity of our sympathies, our morality, and our humanity. With The Best Kind of People, Whittall has created an urgent and timely document, one that asks us to reflect on how we can best serve survivors of abuse and best support all of those who exist in its aftermath. With incredible empathy, and undeniable skill, this book is sure to spark much needed dialogue, vital debate, and richly deserved acclaim.” — Stacey May Fowles, author of Infidelity

      “Zoe Whittall's novel gets into the hearts and minds of an ordinary family forced to confront the monstrous. There are no heroes and no villains in this world — there are only people grappling with guilt and truth. This novel is a timely discussion of what we owe those who abuse and those who are targeted in our communities. It's a compelling exploration of the ways a crime implicates all of us.” — Kaitlyn Greenidge, author of We Love You, Charlie Freeman

      “Whittall places the reader right at the centre of their pain. It’s the best depiction of female suffering I’ve read since Jane Smiley eloquently tackled sexual abuse in A Thousand Acres.” — Toronto Star“Nuanced to the end, Whittall’s novel achieves something that’s rare in real-life cases of sexual violence. She gives a voice to the ones we never hear from: those who are collateral damage.” — Chatelaine“Toronto author Zoe Whittall’s new novel The Best Kind of People is the best kind of book — it’s got a compelling story, characters readers will recognize and come to love, and writing that makes it effortless to turn page after page.” — Vancouver Sun

      “Fast-paced . . . but never melodramatic.” — Maclean’s

      “Exquisitely emotional.” — Owen Sound Sun Times

      “An astounding portrait of a character by omission.” — National Post

      “Whittall raises her game dramatically in this Giller-shortlisted novel.” — NOW Magazine

      “A story like this never ends. . . . A humane, clear eyed attempt to explore the ripple effects of sexual crime.” — Kirkus Reviews

      PRAISE FOR THE MIDDLE GROUND (2010)

      “Whittall’s prose demonstrates vitality and humour as she includes the minutiae of daily life among the bizarre events in Missy's adventure … An entertaining read. Recommended.” — CM Magazine

      PRAISE FOR HOLDING STILL AS LONG AS POSSIBLE (2009):

      LAMBDA LITERARY AWARDS: TRANSGENDER FICTION WINNER
      AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION STONEWALL HONOUR BOOK

      “With Holding Still, Whittall has established herself as a writer of immense vitality and courage; she stands as the voice of a lost, but thanks to her not forgotten, generation: the boys and girls who will inherit the earth.” — National Post

      “An unforgettable depiction of growing up in the new millennium.” — Booklist

      “In Holding Still for as Long as Possible, the awareness of mortality intersects with the romantic restlessness of youth. It makes for a story whose vital signs are fully present and robust.” — Toronto Star

      “Whittall is a dexterous puppeteer, and the book is unputdownable.” — Globe and Mail

      “Whittall creates distinct characters and voices . . . An enjoyable read that is strong on characters.” — Sacramento Book Review

      “Whittall’s writing has a tremendous amount of youthful energy . . . This is a real Toronto story, set against SARS and fears about terrorism.” — Quill & Quire

      “Breathless, jolting, and sputtering with vitality, Holding Still For As Long As Possible explores the inevitable expiry date on lives and relationships, and our white-knuckle struggle to hang on to both.” — Canadian Literature

      PRAISE FOR BOTTLE ROCKET HEARTS (2007):

      A CBC CANADA READS 2011 TOP 10 SELECTION
      WINNER OF THE 2008 DAYNE OGILVIE PRIZE

      “The cockiest, brashest, funniest, toughest, most life-affirming, elegant, scruffy, no-holds-barred writer to emerge from Montreal since Mordecai Richler.” — Globe & Mail

      “Whittall’s background as a poet shines in every paragraph. Her poetic voice hits hard and with beauty … Gutsy, gritty, urban, and sleek, Bottle Rocket Hearts is a compelling story told by a writer skilled in her craft. It leaves me wanting more.” — Vancouver Sun

      “Zoe Whittall’s debut novel, Bottle Rocket Hearts, is an achingly good read, bringing moments of joy to the reader along with heartache and sorrow.” — Calgary Herald

  • 6
    catalogue cover
    Company Town Madeline Ashby Canada
    9780765382900 Hardcover FICTION / Science Fiction On Sale Date: May 17, 2016 Print Run: 15000
    $34.99 CAD 5.79 x 8.53 x 0.99 in | 360 gr | 288 pages Carton Quantity: 20 Canadian Rights: Y Tor Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      2017 Winner of the Sunburst Award Society's Copper Cylinder Adult Award
      2017 Canada Reads Finalist
      2017 Locus Award Finalist for Science Fiction Novel Category

      2017 Sunburst Award Finalist for Adult Fiction
      2017 Aurora Awards Finalist for Best Novel

      Madeline Ashby'sCompany Town is a brilliant, twisted mystery, as one woman must evaluate saving the people of a town that can't be saved, or saving herself.

      "Elegant, cruel, and brutally perfect,Company Town is a prize of a novel." —Mira Grant,New York Times Bestselling and Hugo-Award nominated author of the Newsflesh series


      New Arcadia is a city-sized oil rig off the coast of the Canadian Maritimes, now owned by one very wealthy, powerful, byzantine family: Lynch Ltd.

      Hwa is of the few people in her community (which constitutes the whole rig) to forgo bio-engineered enhancements. As such, she's the last truly organic person left on the rig—making her doubly an outsider, as well as a neglected daughter and bodyguard extraordinaire. Still, her expertise in the arts of self-defense and her record as a fighter mean that her services are yet in high demand. When the youngest Lynch needs training and protection, the family turns to Hwa. But can even she protect against increasingly intense death threats seemingly coming from another timeline?

      Meanwhile, a series of interconnected murders threatens the city's stability and heightens the unease of a rig turning over. All signs point to a nearly invisible serial killer, but all of the murders seem to lead right back to Hwa's front door. Company Town has never been the safest place to be—but now, the danger is personal.

      Bio
      MADELINE ASHBY is a science fiction writer, strategic foresight consultant, anime fan, and expat. Her debut series about killer robots includedvN and the sequel,iD. Her essays and criticism have appeared at BoingBoing, io9.com, WorldChanging, Creators Project, Arcfinity, and Tor.com. Since late 2014, she has been a regular columnist for theOttawa Citizen.
      Marketing & Promotion
        "Plans: -National advertising targeting science fiction & fantasy audiences -Promotion at San Diego & New York Comic-Cons -Author appearances, inc. book festivals -Online publicity campaign & review coverage -Promotion on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, the Tor/Forge blog & newsletter"
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Locus Awards - Nominee 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews

      "A thrilling near-future noir mystery....A fascinating book from a writer with great vision."Charlaine Harris, author of the Sookie Stackhouse Novels series

      “Smart, weird dystopia.” —Margaret Atwood

      "The skill with which Ashby introduces her various SF elements is worthy of the best Heinlein.... Company Town never falters in its pacing. It's a terrific ride." —Locus

      "This is brave, bold, crazy storytelling at the edge and doesn't read like anything else I've seen up or down the pike." —Chuck Wendig,New York Timesbestselling author of Aftermath

      "A brilliant and chilling look at our post-oil future. I haven't been this hooked by an SF novel for ages." —Charles Stross, author of the Laundry Files series

      "LovedCompany Town, Madeline Ashby’s wonderfully imaginative new sci-fi mystery with a fascinating female protagonist." —Feminist Frequency

      "The world is an updated version of Raymond Chandler's, with gray morals and broken characters, and Hwa's internal monologue has just the right balance of introspection and wit...[a] very solid page-turner." —Publishers Weekly

      "A fascinating mix of detective noir and near-future SF with cinematic world building and a broken, but resilient, unquestionably badass heroine." —Booklist

      "
      Ashby's action scenes come thick and fast...the ideas, setting and relationships that make the story really worth reading." —New Zealand Herald




      EditCopy to TI

      "The skill with which Ashby introduces her various SF elements is worthy of the best Heinlein....Company Town never falters in its pacing. It's a terrific ride." --Locus

      "I'm an immense fan of Ashby's work...It is often profound, and it is never boring." —Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    Inside Alix Ohlin Canada
    9781770892064 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: June 16, 2012
    $22.95 CAD 6.25 x 9.25 in | 0.94 lb | 272 pages Carton Quantity: 22 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize, and selected as an Oprah's Book Club Summer Reading Pick, an Amazon.ca Best Book, and an iTunes Store Best Book

      When Grace, a highly competent and devoted therapist in Montreal, stumbles across a man in the snowy woods who has failed to hang himself, her instinct to help immediately kicks in. Before long, however, she realizes that her feelings for this charismatic, extremely guarded stranger are far from straightforward.

      At the same time, her troubled teenage patient, Annie, runs away and soon will reinvent herself in New York as an aspiring and ruthless actress, as unencumbered as humanly possible by any personal attachments. And Mitch, Grace's ex-husband, a therapist as well, leaves the woman he's desperately in love with to attend to a struggling native community in the bleak Arctic. We follow these four compelling, complex characters from Montreal and New York to Hollywood and Rwanda, each of them with a consciousness that is utterly distinct and urgently convincing. With a razor-sharp emotional intelligence, Inside poignantly explores the manifold dangers and imperatives of making ourselves available to, and indeed responsible for, those dearest to us.

      Bio

      ALIX OHLIN is the author of four books, including the novels Inside and Dual Citizens, which were both finalists for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Tin House, Best American Short Stories, and many other publications. Born and raised in Montreal, she lives in Vancouver, where she chairs the creative writing program at the University of British Columbia.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2012, Short-listed
      Oprah's Book Club Summer Reading Pick 2012, Commended
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2012, Short-listed
      Amazon.ca Best Books: Editors' Picks 2012, Commended
      Amazon.ca Best Books: Top 10 Canadian Fiction 2012, Commended
      Globe and Mail Top 100 Book 2012, Commended
      Quill and Quire Books of the Year 2012, Commended
      iTunes Store Best Book of 2012 2012, Commended
      Reviews
      .. the next big thing in North American literature.
      Ohlin displays a profound empathy for people at their least rational -- and most human.
      ... wondrously engrossing ...
      ... vividly pictorial ... Ohlin has as unsettling an old soul as Leonard Cohen’s.
      ... [Alix] Ohlin makes us care ...
      ... [a] twisty, clever and captivating read ... this cunning writer yanks you inside her world.
      Can any of us really save another person? Or is each of us solely responsible for his or her own life? That's the question lurking behind Alix Ohlin's astute novel.
      ... a superb second novel ... next to brilliant phrases and scenes of laugh-eliciting satiric jabs, there are brutal, heartbreaking circumstances.
      ... a serious literary talent.
      Ohlin writes in elegant prose that is flush with wit and style, as clever and as smooth as Lorrie Moore.
      Ohlin knows what she’s doing, and it dawns that what’s true of all good fiction applies even more emphatically here: Inside, though fully satisfying the first time through, all but demands a second reading. It’s something most readers will be more than happy to do.
      ... [an] extremely readable blend of poignancy and sardonic humour ...
      Alix Ohlin’s writing is brilliant. Readers will enjoy ‘Inside’ and will finish anticipating Ohlin’s future works; wanting to see how far she can go.
  • 8
    catalogue cover
    Series: Anansi Book Club Editions
    Sisters Brothers Anansi Book Club edition Patrick deWitt Canada
    9781770890329 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: October 15, 2011
    $22.95 CAD 1.16 lb | 344 pages Carton Quantity: 16 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Winner of the Governor General's Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize, the Prix des libraires du Quebec and the Stephen Leacock Medal. Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and the Walter Scott Prize.

      Hermann Kermit Warm is going to die: Eli and Charlie Sisters can be counted on for that. Though Eli has never shared his brother’s penchant for whiskey and killing, he’s never known anything else. On the road to Warm’s gold-mining claim outside San Francisco -- and from the back of his long-suffering one-eyed horse -- Eli struggles to make sense of his life without abandoning the job he's sworn to do.

      Patrick DeWitt, acclaimed author of Ablutions, doffs his hat to the classic Western, and then transforms it into a comic tour-de-force with an unforgettable narrative voice that captures all the absurdity, melancholy, and grit of the West -- and of these two brothers, bound to each other by blood and scars and love.

      Bio

      PATRICK DEWITT was born on Vancouver Island in 1975. He is the author of three critically acclaimed novels: Undermajordomo Minor, Ablutions and The Sisters Brothers, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and the Stephen Leacock Medal, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2011, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2011, Short-listed
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2011, Winner
      Governor General's Literary Award: Fiction 2011, Winner
      Amazon.ca Best Books: Editors' Pick 2011, Commended
      Amazon.ca Best Books: Canadian Fiction 2011, Commended
      Publishers Weekly Best Book 2011, Commended
      Globe and Mail Top 100 Book 2011, Commended
      Quill and Quire Book of the Year 2011, Commended
      Toronto Star Reviewers' Top 100 Books 2011, Commended
      Maclean's Magazine Best Books 2011, Commended
      Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Book Award 2012, Winner
      CBC Bookie Awards: Literary Fiction 2012, Short-listed
      Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal 2012, Winner
      Walter Scott Prize 2012, Short-listed
      Oregon Book Awards: Ken Kesey Award for Fiction 2012, Winner
      CBA Libris Award: Fiction Book of the Year 2012, Winner
      CBA Libris Award: Author of the Year 2012, Short-listed
      IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2013, Long-listed
      Google Play International Author of the Year 2012, Short-listed
      Prix des libraires du Quebec 2013, Winner
      Reviews
      [Patrick] DeWitt has produced a genre-bending frontier saga that is exciting, funny, and perhaps unexpectedly, moving.
      . . . a lushly voiced picaresque story . . . It`s a kind of True Grit told by Tom Waits.
      . . . smooth and seamless, shot through with dark humor . . . as easy to slip into as the old HBO series `Deadwood.`
      I doubt very much I`ll read a funnier, more original book than this picaresque, Wild West tale . . . a terrifically spun yarn . . . masterfully strange and wonderful . . .
      . . . cinematic, wry and mannered . . . DeWitt[`s] ability to distill an image with a couple of well-chosen words and the precision and intensity of his language gives [The] Sisters [Brothers] a dreamlike aura.
      . . . imaginative and ebullient . . . revels in the hilarious life and times of two gunslingers, Eli and Charlie Sisters.
      . . . gory, mesmerizing . . . carries a strong echo of Pulp Fiction . . . seduces us to its characters, and draws us on the strength of deWitt`s subtle, nothing-wasted prose.
      . . . a witty noir version of Don Quixote . . . hugely entertaining.
      Violent, funny and strangely touching, [The Sisters Brothers is] destined for a spot on many best-of-2011 lists.
      . . . [an] unsettling, compelling and deeply strange picaresque novel.
      . . . spirited and often humorous . . . Patrick deWitt`s picaresque narrative works with a wink and a nod of reverence, squaring with recent revivals of the Western in popular culture, namely HBO`s Deadwood.
      The Sisters Brothers has a cadence and flow to its prose and the reader can almost hear Eli`s laconic narration as the pages turn . . . here is a hardcover that practically holds a Colt to your head and growls: read me.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bloody, nightmarish frontier road trip that seems at times like something out of Cormac McCarthy, yet somehow merges laughter and hope with suffering, death and betrayal. [...] Like an alchemist, deWitt has refined and purified the base metals of black comedy and the western to produce literary gold.
      DeWitt has invigorated [the] well-worn path [of the classic Western] with wit, style, and imagination.
      . . . wryly comic, heartbreakingly sentimental, and immensely likable . . .
      . . . edgy and unyielding . . . The Sisters Brothers gives readers a sense of adventure without ever having to stare down the barrel of a gun.
      There is something irresistibly cinematic about this quirky tale, a Coen brothers-style strangeness that paradoxically celebrates an unlikely humanity.
      So subtle is deWitt`s prose, so slyly note-perfect his rendition of Eli`s voice in all its earnestly charming 19th-century syntax, and so compulsively readable his bleakly funny western noir story, that readers will stick by Eli even as he grinds his heel into the shattered skull of an already dead prospector.
      . . . original, entrancing and entertaining . . .
      In The Sisters Brothers, a diabolical combination of Laurel and Hardy and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (with a touch of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, just to emphasise the high literary stakes) deWitt has ensured another unforgettable pair their place in fictive lore.
      [Patrick deWitt] frequently crosses into comic territory to produce a story that`s weirdly funny, startlingly violent and steeped in sadness.
      . . . darkly hilarious . . . riveting . . . deWitt welcomingly reimagines the [Western] genre.
      Wandering his Western landscape with the cool confidence of a practiced pistoleer, deWitt`s steady hand belies a hair trigger, a poet`s heart and an acute sense of gallows humor . . . It`s easy to imagine John C. Reilly - who is set to star in the film version of the book - lumbering through this breezy, pitch-black comedy`s cinematic scenes.
      . . . fresh, hilariously anti-heroic, often genuinely chilling, and relentlessly compelling. Yes, this is a mighty fine read, and deWitt a mighty fine writer.
      . . . hilarious, dark, twisted and compelling.
      Bursting with vitality and driven along by a terrific pulpy energy, The Sisters Brothers is the kind of book you may well end up wholeheartedly recommending to friends.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative. When they say "They don`t write em like that anymore," they`re wrong.
      . . . comic . . . engaging . . . the brothers` poetic banter and the book`s bracing bursts of violence keep this campfire yarn pulled taut.
      . . . a book that`s both a heck of a lot of fun to read and surprisingly compelling when it ends -- one that both your hipster brother and your straight-arrow dad will get a kick out of.
      Patrick deWitt has written an Old West tale that conjures up the colourful images of a spaghetti western filled with stark realism, eccentric characters and black humour . . . If you`re looking for an unforgettable western, grab this one.
      America seems anything but beautiful in Patrick DeWitt`s quirky and ultimately touching new novel The Sisters Brothers.
      [Patrick deWitt] has taken the typical saga and, with laser-sharp prose, masterful storytelling, and an eccentrically perfect combination of humor, violence, lust, and pathos, has turned it completely upside-down. Never has the Old West seemed so simultaneously and page-turningly beautiful, tragic, and comedic, or a cowboy so delightfully neurotic.
      . . . gritty . . . deadpan . . . very comedic . . . opens new doors in the imagination.
      Fully invested, DeWitt is a hilarious, wry wordsmith and a masterful storyteller. The Sisters Brothers, with its sharp edges and instinctive compassion, is far from historical displacement or genre escapism. It is art worthy of the status, regardless of context or -ism.
      . . . a darkly comic, compelling and surprising story . . . I doubt I`ll find a more entertaining and thoughtful novel this year.
      DeWitt`s inspired, many-layered yarn is as entertaining and as stylistically accomplished as it is unsettling and most original in its revisiting of what remains a glorious genre.
      [Patrick] DeWitt has produced a genre-bending frontier saga that is exciting, funny, and perhaps unexpectedly, moving.
      . . . a lushly voiced picaresque story . . . It`s a kind of True Grit told by Tom Waits.
      . . . smooth and seamless, shot through with dark humor . . . as easy to slip into as the old HBO series `Deadwood.`
      I doubt very much I`ll read a funnier, more original book than this picaresque, Wild West tale . . . a terrifically spun yarn . . . masterfully strange and wonderful . . .
      . . . cinematic, wry and mannered . . . DeWitt[`s] ability to distill an image with a couple of well-chosen words and the precision and intensity of his language gives [The] Sisters [Brothers] a dreamlike aura.
      . . . imaginative and ebullient . . . revels in the hilarious life and times of two gunslingers, Eli and Charlie Sisters.
      . . . gory, mesmerizing . . . carries a strong echo of Pulp Fiction . . . seduces us to its characters, and draws us on the strength of deWitt`s subtle, nothing-wasted prose.
      . . . a witty noir version of Don Quixote . . . hugely entertaining.
      Violent, funny and strangely touching, [The Sisters Brothers is] destined for a spot on many best-of-2011 lists.
      . . . [an] unsettling, compelling and deeply strange picaresque novel.
      . . . spirited and often humorous . . . Patrick deWitt`s picaresque narrative works with a wink and a nod of reverence, squaring with recent revivals of the Western in popular culture, namely HBO`s Deadwood.
      The Sisters Brothers has a cadence and flow to its prose and the reader can almost hear Eli`s laconic narration as the pages turn . . . here is a hardcover that practically holds a Colt to your head and growls: read me.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bloody, nightmarish frontier road trip that seems at times like something out of Cormac McCarthy, yet somehow merges laughter and hope with suffering, death and betrayal. [...] Like an alchemist, deWitt has refined and purified the base metals of black comedy and the western to produce literary gold.
      DeWitt has invigorated [the] well-worn path [of the classic Western] with wit, style, and imagination.
      . . . wryly comic, heartbreakingly sentimental, and immensely likable . . .
      . . . edgy and unyielding . . . The Sisters Brothers gives readers a sense of adventure without ever having to stare down the barrel of a gun.
      There is something irresistibly cinematic about this quirky tale, a Coen brothers-style strangeness that paradoxically celebrates an unlikely humanity.
      So subtle is deWitt`s prose, so slyly note-perfect his rendition of Eli`s voice in all its earnestly charming 19th-century syntax, and so compulsively readable his bleakly funny western noir story, that readers will stick by Eli even as he grinds his heel into the shattered skull of an already dead prospector.
      . . . original, entrancing and entertaining . . .
      In The Sisters Brothers, a diabolical combination of Laurel and Hardy and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (with a touch of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, just to emphasise the high literary stakes) deWitt has ensured another unforgettable pair their place in fictive lore.
      [Patrick deWitt] frequently crosses into comic territory to produce a story that`s weirdly funny, startlingly violent and steeped in sadness.
      . . . darkly hilarious . . . riveting . . . deWitt welcomingly reimagines the [Western] genre.
      Wandering his Western landscape with the cool confidence of a practiced pistoleer, deWitt`s steady hand belies a hair trigger, a poet`s heart and an acute sense of gallows humor . . . It`s easy to imagine John C. Reilly - who is set to star in the film version of the book - lumbering through this breezy, pitch-black comedy`s cinematic scenes.
      . . . fresh, hilariously anti-heroic, often genuinely chilling, and relentlessly compelling. Yes, this is a mighty fine read, and deWitt a mighty fine writer.
      . . . hilarious, dark, twisted and compelling.
      Bursting with vitality and driven along by a terrific pulpy energy, The Sisters Brothers is the kind of book you may well end up wholeheartedly recommending to friends.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative. When they say "They don`t write em like that anymore," they`re wrong.
      . . . comic . . . engaging . . . the brothers` poetic banter and the book`s bracing bursts of violence keep this campfire yarn pulled taut.
      . . . a book that`s both a heck of a lot of fun to read and surprisingly compelling when it ends -- one that both your hipster brother and your straight-arrow dad will get a kick out of.
      Patrick deWitt has written an Old West tale that conjures up the colourful images of a spaghetti western filled with stark realism, eccentric characters and black humour . . . If you`re looking for an unforgettable western, grab this one.
      America seems anything but beautiful in Patrick DeWitt`s quirky and ultimately touching new novel The Sisters Brothers.
      [Patrick deWitt] has taken the typical saga and, with laser-sharp prose, masterful storytelling, and an eccentrically perfect combination of humor, violence, lust, and pathos, has turned it completely upside-down. Never has the Old West seemed so simultaneously and page-turningly beautiful, tragic, and comedic, or a cowboy so delightfully neurotic.
      . . . gritty . . . deadpan . . . very comedic . . . opens new doors in the imagination.
      Fully invested, DeWitt is a hilarious, wry wordsmith and a masterful storyteller. The Sisters Brothers, with its sharp edges and instinctive compassion, is far from historical displacement or genre escapism. It is art worthy of the status, regardless of context or -ism.
      . . . a darkly comic, compelling and surprising story . . . I doubt I`ll find a more entertaining and thoughtful novel this year.
      DeWitt`s inspired, many-layered yarn is as entertaining and as stylistically accomplished as it is unsettling and most original in its revisiting of what remains a glorious genre.
      [Patrick] DeWitt has produced a genre-bending frontier saga that is exciting, funny, and perhaps unexpectedly, moving.
      . . . a lushly voiced picaresque story . . . It`s a kind of True Grit told by Tom Waits.
      . . . smooth and seamless, shot through with dark humor . . . as easy to slip into as the old HBO series `Deadwood.`
      I doubt very much I`ll read a funnier, more original book than this picaresque, Wild West tale . . . a terrifically spun yarn . . . masterfully strange and wonderful . . .
      . . . cinematic, wry and mannered . . . DeWitt[`s] ability to distill an image with a couple of well-chosen words and the precision and intensity of his language gives [The] Sisters [Brothers] a dreamlike aura.
      . . . imaginative and ebullient . . . revels in the hilarious life and times of two gunslingers, Eli and Charlie Sisters.
      . . . gory, mesmerizing . . . carries a strong echo of Pulp Fiction . . . seduces us to its characters, and draws us on the strength of deWitt`s subtle, nothing-wasted prose.
      . . . a witty noir version of Don Quixote . . . hugely entertaining.
      Violent, funny and strangely touching, [The Sisters Brothers is] destined for a spot on many best-of-2011 lists.
      . . . [an] unsettling, compelling and deeply strange picaresque novel.
      . . . spirited and often humorous . . . Patrick deWitt`s picaresque narrative works with a wink and a nod of reverence, squaring with recent revivals of the Western in popular culture, namely HBO`s Deadwood.
      The Sisters Brothers has a cadence and flow to its prose and the reader can almost hear Eli`s laconic narration as the pages turn . . . here is a hardcover that practically holds a Colt to your head and growls: read me.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bloody, nightmarish frontier road trip that seems at times like something out of Cormac McCarthy, yet somehow merges laughter and hope with suffering, death and betrayal. [...] Like an alchemist, deWitt has refined and purified the base metals of black comedy and the western to produce literary gold.
      DeWitt has invigorated [the] well-worn path [of the classic Western] with wit, style, and imagination.
      . . . wryly comic, heartbreakingly sentimental, and immensely likable . . .
      . . . edgy and unyielding . . . The Sisters Brothers gives readers a sense of adventure without ever having to stare down the barrel of a gun.
      There is something irresistibly cinematic about this quirky tale, a Coen brothers-style strangeness that paradoxically celebrates an unlikely humanity.
      So subtle is deWitt`s prose, so slyly note-perfect his rendition of Eli`s voice in all its earnestly charming 19th-century syntax, and so compulsively readable his bleakly funny western noir story, that readers will stick by Eli even as he grinds his heel into the shattered skull of an already dead prospector.
      . . . original, entrancing and entertaining . . .
      In The Sisters Brothers, a diabolical combination of Laurel and Hardy and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (with a touch of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, just to emphasise the high literary stakes) deWitt has ensured another unforgettable pair their place in fictive lore.
      [Patrick deWitt] frequently crosses into comic territory to produce a story that`s weirdly funny, startlingly violent and steeped in sadness.
      . . . darkly hilarious . . . riveting . . . deWitt welcomingly reimagines the [Western] genre.
      Wandering his Western landscape with the cool confidence of a practiced pistoleer, deWitt`s steady hand belies a hair trigger, a poet`s heart and an acute sense of gallows humor . . . It`s easy to imagine John C. Reilly - who is set to star in the film version of the book - lumbering through this breezy, pitch-black comedy`s cinematic scenes.
      . . . fresh, hilariously anti-heroic, often genuinely chilling, and relentlessly compelling. Yes, this is a mighty fine read, and deWitt a mighty fine writer.
      . . . hilarious, dark, twisted and compelling.
      Bursting with vitality and driven along by a terrific pulpy energy, The Sisters Brothers is the kind of book you may well end up wholeheartedly recommending to friends.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative. When they say "They don`t write em like that anymore," they`re wrong.
      . . . comic . . . engaging . . . the brothers` poetic banter and the book`s bracing bursts of violence keep this campfire yarn pulled taut.
      . . . a book that`s both a heck of a lot of fun to read and surprisingly compelling when it ends -- one that both your hipster brother and your straight-arrow dad will get a kick out of.
      Patrick deWitt has written an Old West tale that conjures up the colourful images of a spaghetti western filled with stark realism, eccentric characters and black humour . . . If you`re looking for an unforgettable western, grab this one.
      America seems anything but beautiful in Patrick DeWitt`s quirky and ultimately touching new novel The Sisters Brothers.
      [Patrick deWitt] has taken the typical saga and, with laser-sharp prose, masterful storytelling, and an eccentrically perfect combination of humor, violence, lust, and pathos, has turned it completely upside-down. Never has the Old West seemed so simultaneously and page-turningly beautiful, tragic, and comedic, or a cowboy so delightfully neurotic.
      . . . gritty . . . deadpan . . . very comedic . . . opens new doors in the imagination.
      Fully invested, DeWitt is a hilarious, wry wordsmith and a masterful storyteller. The Sisters Brothers, with its sharp edges and instinctive compassion, is far from historical displacement or genre escapism. It is art worthy of the status, regardless of context or -ism.
      . . . a darkly comic, compelling and surprising story . . . I doubt I`ll find a more entertaining and thoughtful novel this year.
      DeWitt`s inspired, many-layered yarn is as entertaining and as stylistically accomplished as it is unsettling and most original in its revisiting of what remains a glorious genre.
      [Patrick] DeWitt has produced a genre-bending frontier saga that is exciting, funny, and perhaps unexpectedly, moving.
      . . . a lushly voiced picaresque story . . . It's a kind of True Grit told by Tom Waits.
      . . . smooth and seamless, shot through with dark humor . . . as easy to slip into as the old HBO series 'Deadwood.'
      I doubt very much I'll read a funnier, more original book than this picaresque, Wild West tale . . . a terrifically spun yarn . . . masterfully strange and wonderful . . .
      . . . cinematic, wry and mannered . . . DeWitt['s] ability to distill an image with a couple of well-chosen words and the precision and intensity of his language gives [The] Sisters [Brothers] a dreamlike aura.
      . . . imaginative and ebullient . . . revels in the hilarious life and times of two gunslingers, Eli and Charlie Sisters.
      . . . gory, mesmerizing . . . carries a strong echo of Pulp Fiction . . . seduces us to its characters, and draws us on the strength of deWitt's subtle, nothing-wasted prose.
      . . . a witty noir version of Don Quixote . . . hugely entertaining.
      Violent, funny and strangely touching, [The Sisters Brothers is] destined for a spot on many best-of-2011 lists.
      . . . [an] unsettling, compelling and deeply strange picaresque novel.
      . . . spirited and often humorous . . . Patrick deWitt's picaresque narrative works with a wink and a nod of reverence, squaring with recent revivals of the Western in popular culture, namely HBO's Deadwood.
      The Sisters Brothers has a cadence and flow to its prose and the reader can almost hear Eli's laconic narration as the pages turn . . . here is a hardcover that practically holds a Colt to your head and growls: read me.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bloody, nightmarish frontier road trip that seems at times like something out of Cormac McCarthy, yet somehow merges laughter and hope with suffering, death and betrayal. [...] Like an alchemist, deWitt has refined and purified the base metals of black comedy and the western to produce literary gold.
      DeWitt has invigorated [the] well-worn path [of the classic Western] with wit, style, and imagination.
      . . . wryly comic, heartbreakingly sentimental, and immensely likable . . .
      . . . edgy and unyielding . . . The Sisters Brothers gives readers a sense of adventure without ever having to stare down the barrel of a gun.
      There is something irresistibly cinematic about this quirky tale, a Coen brothers-style strangeness that paradoxically celebrates an unlikely humanity.
      So subtle is deWitt's prose, so slyly note-perfect his rendition of Eli's voice in all its earnestly charming 19th-century syntax, and so compulsively readable his bleakly funny western noir story, that readers will stick by Eli even as he grinds his heel into the shattered skull of an already dead prospector.
      . . . original, entrancing and entertaining . . .
      In The Sisters Brothers, a diabolical combination of Laurel and Hardy and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (with a touch of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, just to emphasise the high literary stakes) deWitt has ensured another unforgettable pair their place in fictive lore.
      [Patrick deWitt] frequently crosses into comic territory to produce a story that's weirdly funny, startlingly violent and steeped in sadness.
      . . . darkly hilarious . . . riveting . . . deWitt welcomingly reimagines the [Western] genre.
      Wandering his Western landscape with the cool confidence of a practiced pistoleer, deWitt's steady hand belies a hair trigger, a poet's heart and an acute sense of gallows humor . . . It's easy to imagine John C. Reilly - who is set to star in the film version of the book - lumbering through this breezy, pitch-black comedy's cinematic scenes.
      . . . fresh, hilariously anti-heroic, often genuinely chilling, and relentlessly compelling. Yes, this is a mighty fine read, and deWitt a mighty fine writer.
      . . . hilarious, dark, twisted and compelling.
      Bursting with vitality and driven along by a terrific pulpy energy, The Sisters Brothers is the kind of book you may well end up wholeheartedly recommending to friends.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative. When they say “They don’t write em like that anymore,” they’re wrong.
      . . . comic . . . engaging . . . the brothers' poetic banter and the book’s bracing bursts of violence keep this campfire yarn pulled taut.
      . . . a book that’s both a heck of a lot of fun to read and surprisingly compelling when it ends -- one that both your hipster brother and your straight-arrow dad will get a kick out of.
      Patrick deWitt has written an Old West tale that conjures up the colourful images of a spaghetti western filled with stark realism, eccentric characters and black humour . . . If you’re looking for an unforgettable western, grab this one.
      America seems anything but beautiful in Patrick DeWitt’s quirky and ultimately touching new novel The Sisters Brothers.
      [Patrick deWitt] has taken the typical saga and, with laser-sharp prose, masterful storytelling, and an eccentrically perfect combination of humor, violence, lust, and pathos, has turned it completely upside-down. Never has the Old West seemed so simultaneously and page-turningly beautiful, tragic, and comedic, or a cowboy so delightfully neurotic.
      . . . gritty . . . deadpan . . . very comedic . . . opens new doors in the imagination.
      Fully invested, DeWitt is a hilarious, wry wordsmith and a masterful storyteller. The Sisters Brothers, with its sharp edges and instinctive compassion, is far from historical displacement or genre escapism. It is art worthy of the status, regardless of context or -ism.
      . . . a darkly comic, compelling and surprising story . . . I doubt I'll find a more entertaining and thoughtful novel this year.
      DeWitt’s inspired, many-layered yarn is as entertaining and as stylistically accomplished as it is unsettling and most original in its revisiting of what remains a glorious genre.
      ... sheer brilliance ...
      [Patrick] DeWitt has produced a genre-bending frontier saga that is exciting, funny, and perhaps unexpectedly, moving.
      . . . a lushly voiced picaresque story . . . It's a kind of True Grit told by Tom Waits.
      . . . smooth and seamless, shot through with dark humor . . . as easy to slip into as the old HBO series 'Deadwood.'
      I doubt very much I'll read a funnier, more original book than this picaresque, Wild West tale . . . a terrifically spun yarn . . . masterfully strange and wonderful . . .
      . . . cinematic, wry and mannered . . . DeWitt['s] ability to distill an image with a couple of well-chosen words and the precision and intensity of his language gives [The] Sisters [Brothers] a dreamlike aura.
      . . . imaginative and ebullient . . . revels in the hilarious life and times of two gunslingers, Eli and Charlie Sisters.
      . . . gory, mesmerizing . . . carries a strong echo of Pulp Fiction . . . seduces us to its characters, and draws us on the strength of deWitt's subtle, nothing-wasted prose.
      . . . a witty noir version of Don Quixote . . . hugely entertaining.
      Violent, funny and strangely touching, [The Sisters Brothers is] destined for a spot on many best-of-2011 lists.
      . . . [an] unsettling, compelling and deeply strange picaresque novel.
      . . . spirited and often humorous . . . Patrick deWitt's picaresque narrative works with a wink and a nod of reverence, squaring with recent revivals of the Western in popular culture, namely HBO's Deadwood.
      The Sisters Brothers has a cadence and flow to its prose and the reader can almost hear Eli's laconic narration as the pages turn . . . here is a hardcover that practically holds a Colt to your head and growls: read me.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bloody, nightmarish frontier road trip that seems at times like something out of Cormac McCarthy, yet somehow merges laughter and hope with suffering, death and betrayal. [...] Like an alchemist, deWitt has refined and purified the base metals of black comedy and the western to produce literary gold.
      DeWitt has invigorated [the] well-worn path [of the classic Western] with wit, style, and imagination.
      . . . wryly comic, heartbreakingly sentimental, and immensely likable . . .
      . . . edgy and unyielding . . . The Sisters Brothers gives readers a sense of adventure without ever having to stare down the barrel of a gun.
      There is something irresistibly cinematic about this quirky tale, a Coen brothers-style strangeness that paradoxically celebrates an unlikely humanity.
      So subtle is deWitt's prose, so slyly note-perfect his rendition of Eli's voice in all its earnestly charming 19th-century syntax, and so compulsively readable his bleakly funny western noir story, that readers will stick by Eli even as he grinds his heel into the shattered skull of an already dead prospector.
      . . . original, entrancing and entertaining . . .
      In The Sisters Brothers, a diabolical combination of Laurel and Hardy and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (with a touch of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, just to emphasise the high literary stakes) deWitt has ensured another unforgettable pair their place in fictive lore.
      [Patrick deWitt] frequently crosses into comic territory to produce a story that's weirdly funny, startlingly violent and steeped in sadness.
      . . . darkly hilarious . . . riveting . . . deWitt welcomingly reimagines the [Western] genre.
      Wandering his Western landscape with the cool confidence of a practiced pistoleer, deWitt's steady hand belies a hair trigger, a poet's heart and an acute sense of gallows humor . . . It's easy to imagine John C. Reilly - who is set to star in the film version of the book - lumbering through this breezy, pitch-black comedy's cinematic scenes.
      . . . fresh, hilariously anti-heroic, often genuinely chilling, and relentlessly compelling. Yes, this is a mighty fine read, and deWitt a mighty fine writer.
      . . . hilarious, dark, twisted and compelling.
      Bursting with vitality and driven along by a terrific pulpy energy, The Sisters Brothers is the kind of book you may well end up wholeheartedly recommending to friends.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative. When they say “They don’t write em like that anymore,” they’re wrong.
      . . . comic . . . engaging . . . the brothers' poetic banter and the book’s bracing bursts of violence keep this campfire yarn pulled taut.
      . . . a book that’s both a heck of a lot of fun to read and surprisingly compelling when it ends -- one that both your hipster brother and your straight-arrow dad will get a kick out of.
      Patrick deWitt has written an Old West tale that conjures up the colourful images of a spaghetti western filled with stark realism, eccentric characters and black humour . . . If you’re looking for an unforgettable western, grab this one.
      America seems anything but beautiful in Patrick DeWitt’s quirky and ultimately touching new novel The Sisters Brothers.
      [Patrick deWitt] has taken the typical saga and, with laser-sharp prose, masterful storytelling, and an eccentrically perfect combination of humor, violence, lust, and pathos, has turned it completely upside-down. Never has the Old West seemed so simultaneously and page-turningly beautiful, tragic, and comedic, or a cowboy so delightfully neurotic.
      . . . gritty . . . deadpan . . . very comedic . . . opens new doors in the imagination.
      Fully invested, DeWitt is a hilarious, wry wordsmith and a masterful storyteller. The Sisters Brothers, with its sharp edges and instinctive compassion, is far from historical displacement or genre escapism. It is art worthy of the status, regardless of context or -ism.
      . . . a darkly comic, compelling and surprising story . . . I doubt I'll find a more entertaining and thoughtful novel this year.
      DeWitt’s inspired, many-layered yarn is as entertaining and as stylistically accomplished as it is unsettling and most original in its revisiting of what remains a glorious genre.
      ... sheer brilliance ...
      [Patrick] DeWitt has produced a genre-bending frontier saga that is exciting, funny, and perhaps unexpectedly, moving.
      . . . a lushly voiced picaresque story . . . It's a kind of True Grit told by Tom Waits.
      . . . smooth and seamless, shot through with dark humor . . . as easy to slip into as the old HBO series 'Deadwood.'
      I doubt very much I'll read a funnier, more original book than this picaresque, Wild West tale . . . a terrifically spun yarn . . . masterfully strange and wonderful . . .
      . . . cinematic, wry and mannered . . . DeWitt['s] ability to distill an image with a couple of well-chosen words and the precision and intensity of his language gives [The] Sisters [Brothers] a dreamlike aura.
      . . . imaginative and ebullient . . . revels in the hilarious life and times of two gunslingers, Eli and Charlie Sisters.
      . . . gory, mesmerizing . . . carries a strong echo of Pulp Fiction . . . seduces us to its characters, and draws us on the strength of deWitt's subtle, nothing-wasted prose.
      . . . a witty noir version of Don Quixote . . . hugely entertaining.
      Violent, funny and strangely touching, [The Sisters Brothers is] destined for a spot on many best-of-2011 lists.
      . . . [an] unsettling, compelling and deeply strange picaresque novel.
      . . . spirited and often humorous . . . Patrick deWitt's picaresque narrative works with a wink and a nod of reverence, squaring with recent revivals of the Western in popular culture, namely HBO's Deadwood.
      The Sisters Brothers has a cadence and flow to its prose and the reader can almost hear Eli's laconic narration as the pages turn . . . here is a hardcover that practically holds a Colt to your head and growls: read me.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bloody, nightmarish frontier road trip that seems at times like something out of Cormac McCarthy, yet somehow merges laughter and hope with suffering, death and betrayal. [...] Like an alchemist, deWitt has refined and purified the base metals of black comedy and the western to produce literary gold.
      DeWitt has invigorated [the] well-worn path [of the classic Western] with wit, style, and imagination.
      . . . wryly comic, heartbreakingly sentimental, and immensely likable . . .
      . . . edgy and unyielding . . . The Sisters Brothers gives readers a sense of adventure without ever having to stare down the barrel of a gun.
      There is something irresistibly cinematic about this quirky tale, a Coen brothers-style strangeness that paradoxically celebrates an unlikely humanity.
      So subtle is deWitt's prose, so slyly note-perfect his rendition of Eli's voice in all its earnestly charming 19th-century syntax, and so compulsively readable his bleakly funny western noir story, that readers will stick by Eli even as he grinds his heel into the shattered skull of an already dead prospector.
      . . . original, entrancing and entertaining . . .
      In The Sisters Brothers, a diabolical combination of Laurel and Hardy and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (with a touch of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, just to emphasise the high literary stakes) deWitt has ensured another unforgettable pair their place in fictive lore.
      [Patrick deWitt] frequently crosses into comic territory to produce a story that's weirdly funny, startlingly violent and steeped in sadness.
      . . . darkly hilarious . . . riveting . . . deWitt welcomingly reimagines the [Western] genre.
      Wandering his Western landscape with the cool confidence of a practiced pistoleer, deWitt's steady hand belies a hair trigger, a poet's heart and an acute sense of gallows humor . . . It's easy to imagine John C. Reilly - who is set to star in the film version of the book - lumbering through this breezy, pitch-black comedy's cinematic scenes.
      . . . fresh, hilariously anti-heroic, often genuinely chilling, and relentlessly compelling. Yes, this is a mighty fine read, and deWitt a mighty fine writer.
      . . . hilarious, dark, twisted and compelling.
      Bursting with vitality and driven along by a terrific pulpy energy, The Sisters Brothers is the kind of book you may well end up wholeheartedly recommending to friends.
      The Sisters Brothers is a bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative. When they say “They don’t write em like that anymore,” they’re wrong.
      . . . comic . . . engaging . . . the brothers' poetic banter and the book’s bracing bursts of violence keep this campfire yarn pulled taut.
      . . . a book that’s both a heck of a lot of fun to read and surprisingly compelling when it ends -- one that both your hipster brother and your straight-arrow dad will get a kick out of.
      Patrick deWitt has written an Old West tale that conjures up the colourful images of a spaghetti western filled with stark realism, eccentric characters and black humour . . . If you’re looking for an unforgettable western, grab this one.
      America seems anything but beautiful in Patrick DeWitt’s quirky and ultimately touching new novel The Sisters Brothers.
      [Patrick deWitt] has taken the typical saga and, with laser-sharp prose, masterful storytelling, and an eccentrically perfect combination of humor, violence, lust, and pathos, has turned it completely upside-down. Never has the Old West seemed so simultaneously and page-turningly beautiful, tragic, and comedic, or a cowboy so delightfully neurotic.
      . . . gritty . . . deadpan . . . very comedic . . . opens new doors in the imagination.
      Fully invested, DeWitt is a hilarious, wry wordsmith and a masterful storyteller. The Sisters Brothers, with its sharp edges and instinctive compassion, is far from historical displacement or genre escapism. It is art worthy of the status, regardless of context or -ism.
      . . . a darkly comic, compelling and surprising story . . . I doubt I'll find a more entertaining and thoughtful novel this year.
      DeWitt’s inspired, many-layered yarn is as entertaining and as stylistically accomplished as it is unsettling and most original in its revisiting of what remains a glorious genre.
      ... sheer brilliance ...
  • 9
    catalogue cover
    Series: Anansi Book Club Editions
    Annabel Anansi Book Club edition Kathleen Winter Canada
    9780887842900 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: February 26, 2011
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8 x 1.15 in | 1.32 lb | 480 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General's Award for Fiction, and the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize

      In 1968, into the beautiful, spare environment of remote coastal Labrador, a mysterious child is born: a baby who appears to be neither fully boy nor girl, but both at once.

      Only three people are privy to the secret — the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to raise the child as a boy named Wayne. But as Wayne grows to adulthood within the hyper-masculine hunting culture of his father, his shadow-self — a girl he thinks of as "Annabel" — is never entirely extinguished, and indeed is secretly nurtured by the women in his life.

      Haunting, sweeping in scope, and stylistically reminiscent of Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex, Annabel is a compelling tale about one person's struggle to discover the truth about their birth and self in a culture that shuns contradiction.

      Bio
      Kathleen Winter is the author of the international bestseller, Annabel, which was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the Orange Prize for Fiction, and CBC’s Canada Reads. Her first collection of stories, boys, won both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf–Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John’s, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      New York Times Editors' Choice 2011, Commended
      Globe and Mail Top 100 Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Quill and Quire Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Amazon.ca Best Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Amazon.ca First Novel Award 2011, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2010, Short-listed
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2010, Short-listed
      Governor General's Award: Fiction 2010, Short-listed
      Vancouver Sun Top 10 Canadian Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Independent Literary Awards 2010, Winner
      OLA Evergreen Award 2011, Short-listed
      CBC Bookies: Best Overall Book 2011, Short-listed
      CBC Bookies: Best Scene 2011, Short-listed
      Orange Prize for Fiction 2011, Short-listed
      Thomas Head Raddall Atlantic Fiction Award 2011, Winner
      ReLit Awards: Novel 2011, Long-listed
      IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2011, Long-listed
      Reviews
      The Montreal-based Winter, a native of Newfoundland, possesses a rare blend of lyrical brilliance, descriptive power and psychological and philosophical insight...A compelling, gracefully written novel about mixed gender that sheds insight as surely as it rejects sensationalism. This book announces the arrival of a major writer.
      ...a sprawling book filled with musical prose...
      [Kathleen Winter's] lyrical voice and her crystalline landscape are enchanting.
      Reminiscent of Jeffrey Eugenides' magnificent 2002 novel Middlesex, Winter's treatment of such a delicate issue is amazing and incredibly engaging. Her novel is written with immense sensitivity and grace, not to be missed.
      Read it because it's a story told with sensitivity to language that compels to the last page, and read it because it asks the most existential of questions. Stripped of the trappings of gender, [Kathleen] Winter asks, what are we?
      . . . utterly original . . . a haunting story of family, identity, and the universal yearning to belong.
      Annabel's strength lies in probing the dilemma of sexuality and self-knowledge. I have never read such an intimate portrait of a person struggling to live inside a self that the world sees as a dreadful mistake.
      Annabel is a stunning and stirring debut that signals the long-overdue arrival of a literary talent.
      Annabel is an unforgettable novel of struggles, personal and inter-personal, and Winter's empathetic voice does them justice in a way that connects reader to story. Destined to be one of the biggest novels out of Newfoundland this year, this is a story of isolation and a communication breakdown that breaks a family down, and breaks the reader down along with them.
      A book like this, its topic and beautiful language, the unrelenting sorrow, Winter's insightful characterizations and utter sensitivity, is difficult to do justice to with these few words. I simply want to tell people: read this book. Read it though you know little or nothing about its subject or the author. It will open you up. It will change you.
      . . . Annabel is a novel about divisions, not only between the sexes but also between social classes and, perhaps most crucially, ways of being . . . Winter does a deft job of developing all the characters fully and making their motives understandable . . . It's to Winter's credit that both the fear and the beauty are given vivid expression in this finely crafted novel.
      . . . a poignant and powerful first novel . . .
      This is a remarkable first novel, an accomplished debut by an exciting new voice with a confident, mature style.
      . . . beautifully paced, sometimes shocking and never prurient.
      Winter's dazzling debut addresses the riddle of gender and the tragedy of conformity with astonishing insight and eloquence.
      . . . a confident, serious debut.
      . . . a captivating romantic novel with a happy ending.
      ...a stunning novel, one of the rare kind that might well imbed itself permanently in a reader's psyche.
  • 10
    catalogue cover
    Don't I Know You? Stories Marni Jackson Canada
    9781250089809 Paperback FICTION / Literary On Sale Date: October 17, 2017 Print Run: 30000
    $24.50 CAD 5.14 x 8 x 0.69 in | 220 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity: 32 Canadian Rights: Y Flatiron Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      #1 bestseller in Canada: a debut novel-in-stories that follows one woman's life from age 16 to 60, and what happens when certain celebrities start turning up in her private life.

      What if some of the artists we feel as if we know--Meryl Streep, Neil Young, Bill Murray--turned up in the course of our daily lives?

      This is what happens to Rose McEwan, an ordinary woman who keeps having strange encounters with famous people. In this engrossing, original novel-in-stories, we follow her life from age 17, when she takes a summer writing course led by a young John Updike, through her first heartbreak (witnessed by Joni Mitchell) on the island of Crete, through her marriage, divorce, and a canoe trip with Taylor Swift, Leonard Cohen and Karl Ove Knausgaard. (Yes, read on.)

      With wit and insight, Marni Jackson takes a world obsessed with celebrity and turns it on its head. InDon't I Know You?, she shows us how fame is just another form of fiction, and how, in the end, the daily dramas of an ordinary woman’s life can be as captivating and poignant as any luminary tell-all.

      Bio
      Marni Jackson has won numerous National Magazine Awards for her journalism, humor, and social commentary. Her non-fiction books have challenged popular thinking on subjects as diverse as the culture of motherhood and the treatment of pain. She has published inRolling Stone,London Sunday Times, and every major Canadian magazine.Don’t I Know You?is her first work of fiction.
      Marketing & Promotion
        "Social media advertising, on-sale Author website / landing page available Blogger outreach/mailings ""Now In Paperback"" outreach for print & online coverage Finished copy giveaways on Goodreads"
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Delightful and audacious?Exquisitely written?Poignant and beautifully rendered." -Judith Timson, The Toronto Star "Nothing short of brilliant?[Jackson's] prose here is beautiful: simple, streamlined, quietly honest." -Tara Henley, The Toronto Star "Stopped me in my tracks?Magic." - The Globe and Mail "This playful journey will especially appeal to fiction lovers who are also pop culture fans." - Booklist "Whimsical?Ingenious." - Kirkus Reviews "Full of surprises? Jackson's prose is quicker than a mongoose, sharper than a scalpel-and full of read-aloud sentences. She takes the familiar and makes it fantastical and then makes it familiar again? and-best of all-you never see it coming." -Katherine Heiny, author of Single, Carefree, Mellow "A radiant new voice in fiction?A work of glaring imagination conjured with journalistic observation and instinct." -Terry McDonell, ASME Hall of Fame editor, author of The Accidental Life "Alternately hilarious and heartbreaking?Whip-smart ?An intimate, indelible portrait of a woman's extraordinary life." - Semi Chellas, writer, co-executive producer, Mad Men

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