Arsenal Pulp Press Fall 2018

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    The Scent of Pomegranates and Rose Water Reviving the Beautiful Food Traditions of Syria Habeeb Salloum Canada, Leila Salloum Elias, Muna Salloum Canada
    9781551527420 Hardcover COOKING / Regional & Ethnic Publication Date: October 01, 2018
    $32.95 CAD 8 x 9 x 1.1 in | 360 pages Carton Quantity: 10 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The traditions of Syrian cooking, which go back hundreds of years, are notable for their sensory components, in which aroma and texture are as important as taste and nutrition. Over the centuries, the unique dishes of Greater Syria (bilaad al-shaam) were preserved by those who cooked them. For cooks in imperial households, family homes, or on simple peasant farms, recipes were handed down from generation to generation. Despite centuries of occupation, economic hardships, and political strife, the people of Greater Syria continued to cook their bulgur, lentil, chickpea, kishk, and yogurt dishes as if life around them never changed.

      Syrian-born Habeeb Salloum and his daughters, Leila and Muna, have researched and explored the far reaches of Syrian cuisine for many years (and in Habeeb's case, decades). Their resulting cookbook provides a succinct window into the dining tables of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Syria, when the region was influenced by the Ottoman Empire's reach into Persia and the Arab world. The book includes delectable, heart-healthy recipes -- some familiar, some never before published in English -- many of which have been updated and simplified for modern sensibilities. The book also provides a poignant window into Syrian culture and everyday life then and now -- framed by ageless and truly beautiful food traditions.

      Includes over 150 recipes and numerous full-colour photographs.

      Partial proceeds from the sale of this book will benefit Le centre culturel syrien (Syrian Cultural Centre), a non-profit organization based in Montreal currently dedicating its efforts to help alleviate the plight of the displaced and those who have been impacted by the situation in Syria.


      Bio
      Habeeb Salloum was born in the Qaroum area of Syria and emigrated to Canada when he was a child. For the last thirty years he has been a full-time writer specializing in food, history, and travel. He lives in Toronto.

      Leila Salloum Elias is an instructor in the Arabic program at Penn State University.

      Muna Salloum works at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    The Antifa Comic Book 100 Years of Fascism and Antifa Movements Gord Hill Canada, Mark Bray
    9781551527338 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Nonfiction Publication Date: September 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 8 x 10 x 0.5 in | 128 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The shocking images of neo-Nazis marching in Charlottesville, Virginia, in the summer of 2017 linger, but so do those of the passionate anti-fascist protestors who risked their lives to do the right thing. In this stirring graphic non-fiction book by the author of The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book, Gord Hill looks at the history of fascism over the last 100 years, and the concurrent antifa movements that have worked fastidiously to topple it.

      Fascism is a relatively new political ideology, yet in its short history some of the greatest atrocities against humanity have been carried out in its name. Its poisonous roots have taken hold in every region of the world, from its beginnings in post-World War I Italy, through Nazi Germany, Franco's Spain, and the KKK in America. And today, emboldened by the American president, fascism is alive and well again. At the same time, antifa activists have proven, throughout history and again today, that the spirit of resistance is alive and well, and necessary.

      In The Antifa Comic Book, Gord Hill documents these powerful moments of conflict and confrontation with a perceptive eye and a powerful sense of resolve.

      Full-colour throughout. Includes a foreword by Mark Bray, author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook.

      Bio

      Gord Hill is the author of The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book, The Anti-Capitalist Resistance Comic Book, and The Antifa Comic Book. He is a member of the Kwakwaka'wakw nation whose territory is located on northern Vancouver Island and adjacent mainland in the province of "British Columbia." He has been involved in Indigenous people's and anti-globalization movements since 1990. He lives in British Columbia.



      Mark Bray is a historian of human rights, terrorism, and political radicalism in Modern Europe. He is the author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook (Melville House, 2017) and Translating Anarchy: The Anarchism of Occupy Wall Street (Zero Books, 2013). He wrote the foreword to The Antifa Comic Book by Gord Hill. He is currently a lecturer at Dartmouth College.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Marketing Manager, Cynara Geissler  
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      This brightly colored, action-filled graphic narrative details the long, deep history of fascism and opposition to it ... The book sounds the warning that refusing to recognize the threat and failing to respond physically means failing to learn from history. Even those who oppose Antifa's tactics will find their perspective broadened by this graphic history. -Kirkus Reviews
      A riveting and fact-based history that feels more important than ever ... Hill utilizes the boldness of his graphic medium to venerate the struggle against bigotry, but despite this larger than life lionization, he grounds his story in truth and fact. -Booklist (STARRED REVIEW)
      An informative and fascinating graphic novel history of fascism and those who fought it. -Vancouver Sun
  • 3
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    The Woo-Woo How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family Lindsay Wong Canada
    9781551527369 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date: October 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.9 in | 316 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      2019 CANADA READS FINALIST

      Shortlisted for the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust of Canada Prize for Nonfiction

      In this jaw-dropping, darkly comedic memoir, a young woman comes of age in a dysfunctional Asian family who blame their woes on ghosts and demons when they should really be on anti-psychotic meds.

      Lindsay Wong grew up with a paranoid schizophrenic grandmother and a mother who was deeply afraid of the "woo-woo" -- Chinese ghosts who come to visit in times of personal turmoil. From a young age, she witnessed the woo-woo's sinister effects; when she was six, Lindsay and her mother avoided the dead people haunting their house by hiding out in a mall food court, and on a camping trip, in an effort to rid her daughter of demons, her mother tried to light Lindsay's foot on fire.

      The eccentricities take a dark turn, however, and when Lindsay starts to experience symptoms of the woo-woo herself, she wonders whether she will suffer the same fate as her family.

      At once a witty and touching memoir about the Asian immigrant experience and a harrowing and honest depiction of the vagaries of mental illness, The Woo-Woo is a gut-wrenching and beguiling manual for surviving family, and oneself.

      Bio
      Lindsay Wong is the author of the memoir The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family, finalist for the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust of Canada Prize for Nonfiction. She holds a BFA in creative writing from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and an MFA in literary non-fiction from Columbia University in New York. Her fiction and non-fiction have appeared in No Tokens, The Fiddlehead, Ricepaper, and Apogee Journal. She is the recipient of many awards and fellowships, including from The Studios of Key West, Caldera Arts, and the Historic Joy Kogawa House. She lives in Vancouver.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Hilary Weston Writers' Trust of Canada Prize for Nonfiction 2018, Short-listed
      Canada Reads 2019, Short-listed
      Hubert Evans Nonfiction Prize (BC Book Prizes) 2019, Winner
      Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour 2019, Long-listed
      Reviews
      Someone get Lindsay Wong into a witness protection program for revealing--and illuminating--the secrets that Asian families prefer to keep hidden away. She is caustic, observant, relentless, and, in my opinion, the future of Asian Canadian writing. -Kevin Chong, author of The Plague
      How anyone survives childhood is a mystery, but how Lindsay Wong endured hers is a revelation. Extraordinary in their cruelty and blacker-than-midnight hilarity, Wong's family in The Woo-Woo is unforgettable. Equal parts appalling and riveting, Wong proves that a sense of humor can get you through the most dire circumstances. A riveting, unbelievable family epic told in exquisite, visceral prose, you won't believe it's not fiction. -Elizabeth Greenwood, author of Playing Dead: A Journey Through The World Of Death Fraud
      No definition of "dysfunctional" in any language on earth can hope to adequately describe the bizarre, darkly hilarious antics of Lindsay Wong's extended immigrant family. Every page of this no-holds-barred memoir will leave you astonished and incredulous. -Andreas Schroeder, author of Renovating Heaven
      The Woo-Woo will break your heart then bind it back together. With luxurious prose, dark humor, and a sharp yet tender gaze, Lindsay Wong gives us an unforgettable memoir that mines the truth of her explosive family and its everlasting ripples as they follow her into adulthood. -Lily Brooks-Dalton, author of Motorcycles I've Loved and Good Morning, Midnight
      That Lindsay Wong is even alive to write this book is amazing. That she can make it into the hilarious, touching, and tragic story that she's given us here is proof that books still have a purpose. Somehow she manages to transform the deeply sad and make it funny, so that we mortals can take it and learn something from it. Her black humor combines with compassion: she represents the realities of mental illness in her family while still telling us the story from their perspective: that of people haunted by The Woo-Woo. After you read this book, you may be, too -- in the best way. -Sarah Perry, author of After the Eclipse: A Mother's Murder, A Daughter's Search
      Here's a memoir so alive and full of 'you can't make this stuff up' that you'll find yourself wincing and snickering and possibly weeping long after reading the last eloquent sentence. The Woo-Woo is both heart-wrenching and batshit insane, and is also beautifully rendered and fearless in its whip-smart humor. Lindsay Wong spares nothing, not even herself, in her search for clarity amidst madness, while the specificity of her prose reminds us of the woo-woo lurking within every family tree. -Sean Madigan Hoen, author of Songs Only You Know: A Memoir
      What if the ghosts and demons of myth were in fact a structure that prevented open conversations about self care and mental health? Lindsay Wong's The Woo-Woo is a brave, funny, and heartbreaking memoir that takes on the mysticism so regularly sold to us as part of the Asian and Asian American experience and presents a side we don't often see: that of a young woman struggling to survive her family's adherence to a belief system she knows will doom her and them both. -Alexander Chee, author of How To Write an Autobiographical Novel
      Wong's debut harrowingly portrays a family who 'believed that mental illness, or any psychological disturbance, was caused by demonic possession' ... A raw, profane, and funny memoir. --Kirkus Reviews
      Darkly funny, steeped in the macabre and grotesque, The Woo-Woo is at once an unflinching portrait of a borderline abusive childhood and a testament to the power that family has to shape us for good or ill ... Rich with gritty, hard-earned insight, The Woo-Woo illuminates the shaky reality of living across two cultures and offers a difficult, tenuous bridge between these worlds. --Quill and Quire (A Best Book of 2018)
      Wong's generational history of intertwined mental illness and supernatural beliefs drives her harrowing but sharply funny memoir. --Toronto Star
  • 4
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    Care Work Dreaming Disability Justice Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha
    9781551527383 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / People with Disabilities Publication Date: October 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.8 in | 266 pages Carton Quantity: 28 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      In their new, long-awaited collection of essays, Lambda Literary Award-winning writer and longtime disability justice activist and performance artist Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha explores the politics and realities of disability justice, a movement that centres the lives and leadership of sick and disabled queer, trans, Black, and brown people, with implications and gifts for all. Leah writes passionately and personally about creating spaces by and for sick and disabled queer people of colour, and creative "collective access" -- access not as a chore but as a collective responsibility and pleasure -- in our communities and political movements. Bringing their survival skills and knowledge from years of cultural and activist work, Piepzna-Samarasinha explores everything from the economics of queer femme emotional labour, to suicide in queer and trans communities, to the nitty gritty of touring as a sick and disabled queer artist of colour.

      Care Work
      is essentially a mapping of access as radical love, a celebration of the work that sick and disabled queer/people of colour are doing to find each other and to build power and community, and a toolkit for everyone who wants to build radically resilient, sustainable communities of liberation where no one is left behind. Powerful and passionate, Care Work is a crucial and necessary call to arms for all.
      Bio
      Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer disabled nonbinary femme writer and cultural worker of Burger/Tamil Sri Lankan and Irish/Roma ascent. Her books include the memoir Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home, shortlisted for Lambda Literary and
      Publishing Triangle Awards, and the poetry collections Body Map and Love Cake. A lead artist with the disability justice performance collective Sins Invalid, she teaches, performs, and lectures across North America. Raised in Worcester, MA, she divides her time between T'karonto and South Seattle.

      brownstargirl.org
      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews
      Page after page, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha documents the necessity, power, and sheer brilliance of disability justice. Be prepared for her words, stories, and political thinking to shake up what you know about care and access, revolutionary dreaming, and present-day resilience. -Eli Clare, author of Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure and Exile
      As a Black disabled activist, cultural worker, and collector of art, books and music by people of color with disabilities for more than twenty years, I'm excited and thirsty for Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha's Care Work. As one of the original thinkers of Disability Justice, I'm overjoyed that artists and activists like Leah are writing books like this one that helps water the roots of Disability Justice. This book is coming from the bed, the streets and on stages that Leah has spoke, taught, performed and struggled on -- thats why it's so accessible and brings lived knowledge into our outdated, stiff institutions and activist movements. In this era of hyper capitalism, toxic hypermasculinity, and White supremacy, we desperately need Care Work. -Leroy F Moore Jr., co-founder of Sins Invalid, co-founder of National Black Disability Coalition
      Leah knows that the world we deserve is a world shaped by the honest, messy, skillful genius of disabled queer femmes of color. Reading this book allows you to live inside the gorgeous, uncomfortable, emergent, compassionate world that disabled femmes of color have been making all along. Leah cares for us all with this work, but not in the apologetic, default, mommy mode you may be trained to expect. This care is the survivor-sourced, survivor-accountable, saltysweet truthtelling we need to (guess what?) SURVIVE. -Alexis Pauline Gumbs, author of M Archive and Spill, co-editor of Revolutionary Mothering
      Leah writes brilliantly about sick/disabled/mad/neurodivergent genius, collective care work, and all-too-familiar patterns of abuse and trauma that happen even/especially in radical spaces/marginalized people's communities. Care Work is a necessary intervention for those in queer/trans people-of-color spaces and white disability spaces alike, but more importantly, it's an offering of love to all of us living at multiple margins, between spaces of recognition and erasure, who desperately need what Leah has to say. This book is an invitation to dream and to build and to love, as slowly and imperfectly and unevenly as we need to. -Lydia X.Z. Brown, co-editor of All the Weight of Our Dreams: On Living Racialized Autism
      We have mad crip dreams. In those dreams there exists a decolonized, liberated future in which none of our bodies and lives are disposable. With Care Work, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha reminds us that turning these dreams into radical practices have already been done, are happening right now within disability justice movements, and will continue to build a future where we are all free. This book is a touchstone for our journey. -Qwo-Li Driskill, author of Asegi Stories: Cherokee Queer and Two-Spirit Memory
      Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha has written a brave and brilliant book that captures the messy gestation and wildly liberating vision of disability justice. With passionate integrity, she tells the collective story of a movement that transforms the idea of care into a force capable of unraveling all the braided injustices of our lives. -Aurora Levins Morales, author of Medicine Stories and Kindling: Writings On the Body
      Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice is a collection profoundly necessary at this moment ... the essays share a fundamental hypothesis: to achieve social justice, ableism must be destroyed. Personal narratives and accounts of organizing are voiced from Black and brown and queer disabled people, radically reimagining the ways our society is structured, uplifting visions and models for care webs that create collective access. -Broadly (Best Books of the Year)
      An instant classic, Care Work is equal parts on-the-ground dispatch from the disability justice movement and practical field guide to liberatory access. Rather than something to be begrudgingly tacked on, accessibility, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha shows us, might be joyous and collective. -Smithsonian Magazine
  • 5
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    MURDER BY MILKSHAKE An Astonishing True Story of Adultery, Arsenic, and a Charismatic Killer Eve Lazarus
    9781551527468 Paperback TRUE CRIME / Murder Publication Date: October 01, 2018
    $21.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.7 in | 248 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      When forty-year-old Esther Castellani died a slow and agonizing death in Vancouver in 1965, the official cause was at first undetermined. The day after Esther’s funeral, her husband, Rene, packed up his girlfriend, Lolly; his daughter, Jeannine; and Lolly’s son, Don, in the company car and took off for Disneyland. If not for the doggedness of the doctor who treated Esther, Rene, then a charismatic and handsome CKNW radio personality, would have been free to marry Lolly, who was the station’s pretty twentysomething receptionist. Instead, Rene was charged with capital murder for poisoning his wife with arsenic-flavoured milkshakes in one of British Columbia’s most sensational criminal cases of the century. 

      The Secret Poisoner is the compelling story of the Castellanis, and of their daughter, Jeannine, who was eleven at the time of her mother’s murder and who clung to her father’s innocence, even committing perjury during his trial. Rigorously researched, and based on dozens of interviews with family, friends, and co-workers, The Secret Poisoner documents the sensational case that kept Vancouver spellbound, while providing a snapshot of the city’s Mad Men–esque social and political realities in the 1960s.

      Bio
      Eve Lazarus is a journalist, crime historian, and author. Her passion for non-traditional history and a fascination with murder has led to six books of non-fiction, including the BC bestsellers Blood, Sweat, and Fear: The Story of Inspector Vance, Vancouver’s First Forensic Investigator; Cold
      Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders; and Sensational Vancouver.

      evelazarus.com
      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Prize (BC Book Prizes) 2019, Short-listed
      Crime Writers of Canada Arthur Ellis Award 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews
      Not only a compelling insight into the methodical detective work of a 1960s homicide investigation but also a revealing exposé of one of the most high-profile crimes in Vancouver history. -Superintendent Mike Porteous, Vancouver Police Department
      Eve Lazarus has done an exceptional job of reporting one of the most shocking and fascinating murder stories in Vancouver history. Her research is outstanding. -George Garrett, CKNW radio reporter (retired)
      Eve Lazarus has written a chilling and highly readable story full of fascinating characters. Well done. -Dr. Heather Burke, forensic psychologist
      Deeply researched, Eve Lazarus has done everything short of getting up on top of the BowMac sign herself to get to the heart of the story behind the notorious Rene Castellani, whose crime is still one of the most unbelievable, strange, and remarkable chapters in Vancouver crime history. This isn't a murder mystery story in the traditional sense; Lazarus reveals a greater mystery about the motivations and actions of a criminal, how deeply the crime affected the innocent around him, the legacy of which plays out to this day. -Aaron Chapman, author of The Last Gang in Town and Liquor, Lust, and the Law
  • 6
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    The Tiger Flu Larissa Lai Canada
    9781551527314 Paperback FICTION / LGBT Publication Date: September 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.9 in | 334 pages Carton Quantity: 22 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      In this visionary novel by Larissa Lai -- her first in sixteen years -- a community of parthenogenic women, sent into exile by patriarchal and corporate Salt Water City, go to war against disease, technology, and an economic system that threatens them with extinction.

      Kirilow is a doctor apprentice whose lover, Peristrophe, is a "starfish," a woman who can regenerate her own limbs and organs, which she uses to help her clone sisters whose organs are failing. When a denizen from Salt Water City suffering from a mysterious flu comes into their midst, Peristrophe becomes infected and dies, prompting Kirilow to travel to the city, where the flu is now a pandemic, to find a new starfish who will help save her sisters. There, Kirilow meets Kora, a girl-woman desperate to save her family from the epidemic. Kora has everything Kirilow is looking for, except the will to abandon her own family. But before Kirilow can convince her, both are kidnapped by a mysterious group of men to serve as test subjects for a new technology that can cure the mind of the body.

      Bold, beautiful, and wildly imaginative, The Tiger Flu is at once a saga of two women heroes, a cyberpunk thriller, and a convention-breaking cautionary tale -- a striking metaphor for our complicated times.

      Bio

      Larissa Lai was born in La Jolla, California, grew up in St. John's, Newfoundland, and currently lives in Calgary. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Calgary and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia. She was awarded an Astraea Foundation Emerging Writers Award in 1995. Her novel When Fox is a Thousand was first published by Press Gang Publishers in 1995; a new edition, featuring an afterword by the author, was published by Arsenal Pulp Press in 2004. In 2009, she published Automaton Biographies (Arsenal Pulp), her first solo poetry book that was shortlisted for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize at the BC Book Prizes. She is also the author of Salt Fish Girl (Thomas Allen Publishers, 2002), as well as a book-length collaborative long poem with Rita Wong called sybil unrest, published by Line Books in 2009. Larissa's latest novel is The Tiger Flu.

      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Lambda Literary Award 2019, Short-listed
      James Tiptree Jr. Honor List 2019, Winner
      City of Calgary W.O. Mitchell Book Award 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews
      After disease and environmental destruction reorder the world, Larissa Lai's rebel clones and flu-ridden survivors inhabit a future both wildly imaginative and shockingly cruel. Blending the surreal and the entirely possible, The Tiger Flu is majestically compelling. A must-read. -Eden Robinson, author of Son of a Trickster
      Larissa Lai's imagination is both scintillating and dark, and somewhere in this intersection lies her genius. Orwell said that writing a dystopian novel, such as 1984, was like surviving a long illness. Reading The Tiger Flu -- Lai's 2145 and onward -- is itself a fever dream, a shivering premonition, a familiar and strange future. This is the sort of fiction we will all need to contract if we are to find a way to live on this side of the point of no return. -Wayde Compton, author of The Outer Harbour
      This novel is a dazzling singularity. Larissa Lai has conjured a future so darkly brilliant and believable, it feels like now, magnified. No other writer could bring us these vital, enduring dreams. There is so much here to marvel at, to savour and to ponder deeply. -Warren Cariou, author of Lake of the Prairies
      Starting with an atmospheric opening page, in The Tiger Flu, Larissa Lai goes wholly maximalist in her world-building ... A surprisingly enchanting vision of post-Peak Oil dystopia. -Toronto Star
      A tantalizing novel, replete with the kind of detail that recalls the world of Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam trilogy yet belongs to another territory entirely, thrillingly its own. With Atwood you're in a world that's odd but recognizable, whereas with Lai, you're in a world that's completely strange -- until it shocks you with a flash of the familiar. -Quill and Quire
      This is an ambitious work and Lai is wonderfully successful in her effort to mash up cinematic science fiction, magical realism elements and fascinating characters with a fierce concern for gender and racial justice to produce an impressive text. -Vancouver Sun
      Life - fierce, painful, unyielding, complicated - bursts from every page of The Tiger Flu ... Lai inventively and provocatively centres the archetypes of the exile, the monster, and the dispossessed, fleshing out her characters with ferocity, genius, and vulnerability all at once. -Autostraddle ("Best Books of the Year")
      A compelling read about ostracization, disease, technology, tolerance, and survival in a society facing extinction from a horrific pandemic. -The Advocate ("Best Books of the Year")
      A compelling cyberpunk thriller ... Lai draws inspiration from the feminist science fiction of Marge Piercy and Joanna Russ, exploring questions of reproduction, lesbian separatism, and biopolitics in the often absurdist and even surrealist world of Saltwater City. -Booklist
      Lai presents a fascinating scenario of a community of women who are completely self-sufficient, imagining a unique set of kinship relations between female humans, clones, and nature. This queering of the future is the one truly utopian aspect of the novel and it's pretty fabulous. -Midinette
  • 7
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    Sketchtasy Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
    9781551527291 Paperback FICTION / LGBT Publication Date: October 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.65 in | 270 pages Carton Quantity: 28 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Lambda Literary Award finalist

      Sketchtasy takes place in that late-night moment when everything comes together, and everything falls apart: it's an urgent, glittering, devastating novel about the perils of queer world-making in the mid-'90s.

      This is Boston in 1995, a city defined by a rabid fear of difference. Alexa, an incisive twenty-one-year-old queen, faces everyday brutality with determined nonchalance. Rejecting middle-class pretensions, she negotiates past and present traumas with a scathing critique of the world. Drawn to the ecstasy of drugged-out escapades, Alexa searches for nourishment in a gay culture bonded by clubs and conformity, willful apathy, and the spectre of AIDS. Is there any hope for communal care?

      Sketchtasy brings 1990s gay culture startlingly back to life, as Alexa and her friends grapple with the impact of growing up at a time when desire and death are intertwined. With an intoxicating voice and unruly cadence, this is a shattering, incandescent novel that conjures the pain and pageantry of struggling to imagine a future.

      Bio
      Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is the award-winning author of a memoir and three novels, and the editor of five non-fiction anthologies. Her memoir The End of San Francisco won a Lambda Literary Award, and Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots? was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book. Her latest book is the novel Sketchtasy. Mattilda lives in Seattle.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Lambda Literary Award 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews
      “If Sketchtasy doesn't become a classic, we are doomed. Mattilda has such complete command of craft here that she is able to evoke experience rather than simply describe it. Whether or not we identify with her characters, she lets us into their hearts and perceptions through sheer talent, raw honesty, and the sophisticated ability to handle word order, duration, pacing, and soul. The form of this novel is determined organically from the emotions at their core. A lesson in how to write, how to remember, how to grapple with history.” ―Sarah Schulman, author of Conflict Is Not Abuse

      “I thought it was impossible that Sycamore could get any better, but Sketchtasy is a vivid masterpiece that rivals the likes of Last Exit to Brooklyn by Hubert Selby Jr. It's dangerous, hilarious, scary, and transcendentally beautiful. Sycamore's prose is so searing, you might want to read it with sunglasses.” ―Jake Shears, singer

      “Every sentence in Sketchtasy is a living thing, fierce and funny and a little bit dangerous -- a voice made of coke dust and club lights, cut with crackling insight. I was completely addicted to the story of Alexa's search for connection, set in the gritty Boston nightclub scene in the 90s. Nobody writes like Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore -- most writers wouldn't dare try.” ―Julie Buntin, author of Marlena



  • 8
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    Synchro Boy Shannon McFerran Canada
    9781551527444 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / LGBT Age (years) from 14 Publication Date: November 01, 2018
    $16.95 CAD 5.5 x 8 x 0.5 in | 274 pages Carton Quantity: 26 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Sixteen-year-old Bart Lively desperately wants to feel comfortable in his own skin. Being a jock doesn't mean he isn't the target of gay jokes, and the macho culture of his swim team is wearing him down. When he gives in to his curiosity and tries synchronized swimming, he discovers he has a natural talent -- not to mention a spark with one of the girls. So when Erika Tenaka asks him to swim the mixed duet with her, he commits to taking them all the way to the Olympics.

      But judges' scores and Erika's sudden decision to quit the duet threaten to derail Bart's dream and kill what made the sport so liberating and alluring in the first place. And it doesn't help that as he falls in love with Erika, he's falling in lust with her frenemy ... not to mention a cute boy in the diving club.

      Ultimately, Bart will have to give in to his intuition as it leads him to realize there are many ways to be a boy. If he doesn't, he'll lose not only his friendship with Erika but also his new Olympic dream -- and the joy he feels as he dances in the deep.
      Bio
      Shannon McFerran studied writing at the University of Victoria and earned an MFA in creative writing from the University of British Columbia. She has published short stories in numerous literary magazines and a YA anthology. Synchro Boy is her first novel. She lives in Victoria, BC.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Cynara Geissler 
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Synchro Boy is the kind of book the world needs more of: a book that challenges readers to think more deeply about gender and gender expression. Bart's story -- of a boy who has never fit easily into a gender stereotyped box, who has endured years of gender policing, who is bravely determined to find his own path in both sports and relationships -- is an important and powerful one. Readers will cheer Bart on as he swims his way towards ‘living a different kind of maleness.’” ―Robin Stevenson, author of Pride: Celebrating Diversity & Community


      Synchro Boy is a funny, bittersweet story of a teenaged boy’s self-awareness and acceptance, set within that ultimate crucible of teenage lust: the swimming pool. By joining synchro, Bart pushes against the narrow cage of masculinity, only to discover just how hard the bars will push back. Armed with perseverance, hope, and some edifying relationships, he finds the courage to follow his synchro dreams. Readers will come to know and appreciate the challenge and camaraderie of synchronized swimming.” ―Douglas Davey, author of Switch


  • 9
    catalogue cover
    Chinatown Ghosts The Poems and Photographs of Jim Wong-Chu Jim Wong-Chu Canada
    9781551527482 Paperback POETRY / Asian Publication Date: August 31, 2018
    $21.95 CAD 8 x 10 x 0.2 in | 128 pages Carton Quantity: 34 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Jim Wong-Chu is a legend in the Asian Canadian writing community. As founder of the Asian Canadian Writers' Workshop (and its magazine Ricepaper), he constantly encouraged and inspired writers across the country to get their work published and acknowledged, from Paul Yee and Evelyn Lau to Madeleine Thien and Catherine Hernandez. When Jim passed away in 2017, at the age of sixty-eight, he left not only a void in the Asian Canadian writing and publishing community but also a legacy of his own work that was never fully recognized.

      When it first appeared in 1986, Chinatown Ghosts was the first-ever Chinese Canadian poetry book ever published; the poems spoke eloquently to the Chinese Canadian experience, both historical and present-day. Out of print for some twenty-five years, this new edition also includes Jim's striking and evocative photographs of Vancouver's Chinatown, revealing the soul of a place and a community that is threatened by gentrification and displacement.

      The book also contains numerous tributes to Jim from some of Canada's finest Asian-Canadian writers and editors, including Allan Cho, Glenn Deer, Catherine Hernandez, SKY Lee, Fred Wah, Terry Watada, Rita Wong, and Paul Yee.

      Chinatown Ghosts is a moving and stirring tribute to a poet, a photographer, and a community.

      "I see the poems of Chinatown Ghosts not just as snapshots of a time and place gone by but as a necessary and panoramic part of Jim's struggle to envision a world that acknowledges difference." --Fred Wah, from his essay in the book


      Bio

      Jim Wong-Chu is a writer, historian, and editor. He is a founding member of the Asian Canadian Writers' Workshop, the publisher of Ricepaper magazine and co-editor of AlliterAsian and of Swallowing Clouds.


      Marketing & Promotion

        Cynara Geissler 

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