Book*hug Fall 2018/Winter 2019

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    9781771664196 Paperback FICTION / LGBT Publication Date:October 01, 2018
    $20.00 CAD 5.5 x 8 x 0.4 in | 240 gr | 240 pages Carton Quantity:22 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      We All Need to Eat is a new collection of linked stories from award-winning author Alex Leslie that revolve around Soma, a young Queer woman in Vancouver, chronicling her attempts to come to grips with herself, her family and her sexuality.

      Set in different moments falling between Soma's childhood and her late thirties, each story--bold and varying in its approach to narrative--presents a sea change in Soma's life, from Soma becoming addicted to weightlifting while going through a break-up in her thirties; to her complex relationship with her younger brother after she leaves home revealed over the course of a long family chicken dinner; to Soma's struggles to cope with her mother's increasing instability by becoming fixated on buying her a lamp for seasonal affective disorder; and the far-reaching impact and lasting reverberations of Soma's family's experience of the Holocaust as it scrapes up against the rise of Alt Right media. Lyrical, gritty and atmospheric, Soma's stories refuse to shy away from the contradictions inherent to human experience, exploring one young person's journey through mourning, escapism, and the search for nourishment.
      Bio
      Alex Leslie was born and lives in Vancouver. She is the author of the short story collection People Who Disappear (2012) which was nominated for the 2013 Lambda Literary Award for Debut Fiction and a 2013 ReLit Award, as well as a collection of prose poems, The things I heard about you (2014), which was shortlisted for the 2014 Robert Kroestch Award for Innovative Poetry. Alex's short fiction has been included in the Journey Prize Anthology, The Best of Canadian Poetry in English, and in a special issue of Granta spotlighting Canadian writing, co-edited by Madeleine Thien and Catherine Leroux.
      Marketing & Promotion
        ARCs available June 2018.
        Tour: Vancouver, Victoria, Calgary, Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Praise for We All Need To Eat:

      We All Need to Eat is a stunning inquiry into the sharpness of the world as it collides with the fragility--the ambiguities and possibilities--of the self. Alex Leslie a tremendously gifted and compassionate writer. This bold and searing collection is a wonder. --Madeleine Thien, Scotiabank Giller Prize winning author of Do Not Say We Have Nothing
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Smells Like Stars D. Nandi Ohdiambo Canada
    9781771664233 Paperback FICTION / African American Publication Date:October 08, 2018
    $20.00 CAD 5.3 x 8 x 0.55 in | 330 gr | 240 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Kerstin Ostheim, a journalist, and P. J. Banner, a freelance photographer, have been together six months after meeting on a dating website. They are getting married in two weeks and as the wedding fast approaches, they question their compatibility while investigating mysterious horse killings that are taking place in Ogweyo's Cove, the Pacific tourist haven where they live.

      In the meantime, Schuld Ostheim, Kerstin's transgender daughter from her first marriage, is preparing for an art exhibit after being hospitalized for a physical assault while her boyfriend, Woloff, an Olympic medalist in the 1500m, comes to terms with a career ending knee injury. As Kerstin and P.J. get closer to the truth about the dead horses, they also begin to more clearly see each other. Simultaneously, Schuld and Woloff encounter obstacles caused by how their relationships with the past effects their sense of a possible future.

      Ultimately, Smells Like Stars draws attention to what is hidden in plain sight, that life can be cruel, ambiguous and without meaning.
      Bio
      D. Nandi Odhiambo is the author of three novels: diss/ed banded nations (1998), Kipligat's Chance (2003) and The Reverend's Apprentice (2008). Originally from Nairobi Kenya, Nandi moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba in the 1970s. He has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a PhD in English from the University of Hawai'i, Manoa. Currently Nandi lives in O'ahu, Hawai'i, with his wife Carmen and two dogs, where he works as an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Hawai'i, West O'ahu.
      Marketing & Promotion
        ARCs available June 2018
        Tour: Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    The Faerie Devouring Catherine Lalonde Canada, Oana Avasilichioaei Canada
    9781771664271 Paperback FICTION / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology Publication Date:November 01, 2018
    $20.00 CAD 5.5 x 8 x 0.3 in | 180 gr | 140 pages Carton Quantity:13 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Winner of the 2019 Cole Foundation Prize for Translation

      A modern-day fable and mythic bildungsroman, The Faerie Devouring tells the story of a young girl raised by her grandmother (a stalwart matriarch and wicked fairy godmother) following her mother's death during childbirth. The absent mother haunts the story of this girl whose greatest misfortune is to have been born female.

      In this critically-acclaimed coming-of-age story by Quebecois author Catherine Lalonde, and translated by Oana Avasilichioaei, questions of what it means to be born female and grow into a woman are explored. The story is rife with song, myth, phantasmagoria, spells, desire, ferocious poetic telling, wild imagination, and unruly language. Lalonde uses the form of a disenchanted and metaphorical fable to recount what it means to find a life force in one's lineage, even when one is born into "nothing."
      Bio

      Winner of the 2019 Cole Foundation Prize for Translation

      Catherine Lalonde lives in Montreal. She writes poetry (books include Cassandre, 2005 and Corps étranger, 2008, winner of the Émile-Nelligan Award) and works as a journalist for the Montreal daily Le Devoir.

      Montreal-based writer, translator, and editor Oana Avasilichioaei has published five poetry collections, including Expeditions of a Chimaera (with Erín Moure; 2009), We, Beasts (2012; winner of the A.M. Klein Prize for Poetry from the Quebec Writers' Federation) and Limbinal (2015). Previous translations include Bertrand Laverdure's Universal Bureau of Copyrights (2014; shortlisted for the 2015 ReLit Awards), Suzanne Leblanc's The Thought House of Philippa (co-translated with Ingrid Pam Dick; 2015), and Daniel Canty's Wigrum (2013). Her translation of Bertrand Laverdure's Readopolis won the 2017 Governor General's Literary Award for Translation.

      Marketing & Promotion
        Electronic ARCs available August 2018
        Tour: Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, NY
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Lalonde’s language is organic, pulsing, and repetitive in the way of fairy tales. The Faerie Devouring is a loose, impressionistic text that captures the fraught, shifting relationship between the sprite and her Gramma."
      "“I want to draw attention to the translator’s own virtuosity and
      dexterity in rendering Lalonde’s densely poetic, experimental and semantically complex language. French nursery rhymes and lullabies are transformed into English ones, and passages such as the one above, with its neologisms, English expressions and echoes from other Quebec writers, are joyously and imaginatively rendered."

      Before this truly unique and impressive book, one is both utterly
      transfixed and fully implicated, mystified and illuminated. Its opacity is inviting, its obscurity intriguing. With The Faerie Devouring, Oana Avasilichioaei doesn’t only translate language, she translates a language. A language, because Catherine Lalonde clearly wrote La dévoration de fées in an idiom all her own, specific to herself and her motley cast of spectral characters… In other words, this is a most ambitious translation project. An extraordinary book, and an equally extraordinary translation.

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    Series: Essais
    Refuse CanLit in Ruins Erin Wunker Canada, Julie Rak Canada, Hannah McGregor Canada
    9781771664318 Paperback LITERARY CRITICISM / Canadian Publication Date:November 15, 2018
    $25.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.75 in | 360 gr | 260 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      CanLit--the commonly used short form for English Canadian Literature as a cultural formation and industry--has been at the heart of several recent public controversies. Why? Because CanLit is breaking open to reveal the accepted injustices at its heart. It is imperative that these public controversies and the issues that sparked them be subject to careful and thorough discussion and critique.

      provides a critical and historical context to help readers understand conversations happening about CanLit presently. One of its goals is to foreground the perspectives of those who have been changing the conversation about what CanLit is and what it could be. Topics such as literary celebrity, white power, appropriation, class, rape culture, and the ongoing impact of settler colonialism are addressed by a diverse gathering of writers from across Canada. This volume works to avoid a single metanarrative response to these issues, but rather brings together a cacophonous and ruinous multitude of voices.
      Bio
      Erin Wunker is a teacher and a writer. She teaches courses in Canadian literature and cultural production. She is the author of the multiple award-winning book Notes from a Feminist Killjoy: Essays on Everyday Life. She lives and works in K'jipuktuk/Halifax.

      Julie Rak is a Professor in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta. She holds an Eccles Fellowship at the British Library for 2017-2018 and is also a Killam Professor at the University of Alberta for 2017-28. She is the University of Alberta nominee for the Royal Society of Canada 2018 Lorne Pierce Medal for excellence in Canadian literature scholarship. The author of Boom! Manufacturing Memoir for the Popular Market (2013) and Negotiated Memory: Doukhobor Autobiographical Discourse (2004), Julie has contributed as an editor to many volumes of critically-acclaimed work. With Hannah McGregor, she is the co-author of the Counter-Letter against UBCAccountable, and she sponsors the letter and signatures on a website, accompanied by resources about the controversy. Julie was born on traditional Haudenosaunee territory in New York State, and grew up in Delmar, NY, the traditional territory of the Kanien'kehaken (Mohawk). She currently lives and works on Treaty 6 and Metis territory in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

      Hannah McGregor is an Assistant Professor of Publishing at Simon Fraser University, a feminist podcaster, and a CanLit killjoy. She co-hosts the popular Harry Potter podcast Witch, Please, and hosts the slightly-less-popular podcast Secret Feminist Agenda, a weekly discussion of the insidious, nefarious, insurgent, and mundane ways we enact our feminism in our daily lives. When she isn't podcasting, Hannah writes about Canadian literature and publishing for mostly academic venues, including the edited collections Editing as Cultural Practice in Canada (Wilfrid Laurier University Press 2016) and Reading Modernism With Machines (Palgrave Macmillan 2016). She lives in Vancouver on the territory of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh, and has two cats; one is named after a poet, and the other is named after a breakfast.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Electronic ARCs available August 2018.
  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Holy Wild Gwen Benaway
    9781771664394 Paperback POETRY / LGBT Publication Date:September 01, 2018
    $18.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.3 in | 230 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Winner of the 2019 Governor General's Literary Award for Poetry

      Finalist for the 2019 Trillium Book Award for Poetry

      Finalist for the 2019 Lambda Literary Awards – Transgender Poetry Category

      Finalist for the 2019 Publishing Triangle Awards – Trans and Gender-Variant Literature Category

      Longlisted for the 2019 Pat Lowther Memorial Award

      In her third collection of poetry, Holy Wild, Gwen Benaway explores the complexities of being an Indigenous trans women in expansive lyric poems. She holds up the Indigenous trans body as a site of struggle, liberation, and beauty. A confessional poet, Benaway narrates her sexual and romantic intimacies with partners as well as her work to navigate the daily burden of transphobia and violence. She examines the intersections of Indigenous and trans experience through autobiographical poems and continues to speak to the legacy of abuse, violence, and colonial erasure that defines Canada. Her sparse lines, interwoven with English and Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe), illustrate the wonder and power of Indigenous trans womanhood in motion. Holy Wild is not an easy book, as Benaway refuses to give any simple answers, but it is a profoundly vibrant and beautiful work filled with a transcendent grace.

      Praise for Holy Wild:

      "This is a heart wrenching, thought provoking, honest, and graceful walkthrough of trans realities both on the homeland and in urban settings." —Joshua Whitehead, author of Jonny Appleseed, longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and Full-Metal Indigiqueer

      "As the poet says, "they want one thing and I am many." This book is many things, and we are grateful." —Katherena Vermette, author of the award-winning novel The Break

      "Benaway conjures trans life in a place that is both prior to and in excess of the violence that mires it. It is the emotional infrastructure for something like freedom. Let Benaway lead you there." —Billy-Ray Belcourt, author of This Wound is a World

      Bio

      Gwen Benaway is of Anishinaabe and Métis descent. She has published two collections of poetry, Ceremonies for the Dead and Passage. A Two-Spirited Trans poet, she has been described as the spiritual love child of Tomson Highway and Anne Sexton. She has received many distinctions and awards, including the Dayne Ogilvie Honour of Distinction for Emerging Queer Authors from the Writer's Trust of Canada. Her poetry and essays have been published in national publications and anthologies, including The Globe and Mail, Maclean's Magazine, CBC Arts, and many others. She was born in Wingham, Ontario and currently resides in Toronto, Ontario.

      Marketing & Promotion
        electronic ARCs available July 2018
        Tour: Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Vancouver, Calgary
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Praise for Holy Wild:

      ninanâskomitin katawasisin kîya ômac âcimowinak: I am so grateful for your beautiful stories, Gwen! Her narrator, like the phoenix she breathes life into, rises into a fully emblazoned piyêsîs that etches out space--in both the whiteness of queerness and the very muds and waters that birth us--for 2SQ and trans Indigenous livelihoods and literatures. This is a heart wrenching, thought provoking, honest, and graceful walkthrough of trans realities both on the homeland and in urban settings. As Benaway notes, "creation opens around [language]" in Holy Wild and as she holds our hands through story, she "wash[es] away layers" from stones ruddy with sediment; and she too "broke open the world to let [us] step into it." This book is a birthing of a body, in all of its varied meanings, which is always a promise "wild in [its] convergence[s]." ay-hay, nisâkihitowin awa. &mdashJoshua Whitehead, author of Full-Metal Indigiqueer and Johnny Appleseed

      "Holy Wild! Holy Gwen! I think of this collection with an exclamation point! "[T]he only word for this is love." And, this book is filled with love--stunning, beautiful, complicated love--love of language, love of bodies, love of love, the hard-won love of self, and more, so much more. As the poet says, "they want one thing and I am many." This book is many things, and we are grateful. --Katherena Vermette, author of the award-winning novel The Break

      "In Holy Wild, Benaway sounds forth a chorus of pronouncements that look something like I am "x," where "x" is at once unavailable to some and ever-proliferating: "this is what makes us holy / even if we are the only ones / who know it." It is in this refusal of singularity that Benaway conjures trans life in a place that is both prior to and in excess of the violence that mires it. "[T]he first day of forever" is forever, is recursive, is softness, is an intimate life outside of the wrath of men who spoil the categories we install hope in, but, above all else, it is the emotional infrastructure for something like freedom. Let Benaway lead you there. --Billy-Ray Belcourt, author of This Wound is a World
  • 6
    catalogue cover
    9781771664431 Paperback POETRY / Women Authors Publication Date:September 10, 2018
    $18.00 CAD 6 x 8.8 x 0.2 in | 140 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      It Begins With The Body by Hana Shafi explores the milestones and hurdles of a brown girl coming into her own. Shafi's poems display a raw and frank intimacy and address anxiety, unemployment, heartbreak, relationships, identity, and faith.

      Accompanied by Shafi's candid illustrations that share the same delightful mixture of grotesque and humour found in her poems, It Begins With The Body navigates the highs and lows of youth. It is about feeling like an outsider, and reconciling with pain and awkwardness. It's about arguing with your mum about wanting to wax off your unibrow to the first time you threw up in a bar in your twenties, and everything in between. Funny and raw, personal and honest, Shafi's exciting debut is about finding the right words you wished you had found when you needed them the most.
      Bio
      Hana Shafi is a writer and artist who illustrates under the name Frizz Kid. Both her visual art and writing frequently explores themes such as feminism, body politics, racism, and pop culture with an affinity to horror. A graduate of Ryerson University's Journalism Program, she has published articles in publications such as The Walrus, Hazlitt, This Magazine, Torontoist, Huffington Post, and has been featured on Buzzfeed India, Buzzfeed Canada, CBC, Flare Magazine, Mashable, and Shameless, Known on Instagram for her weekly affirmation series, she is also the recipient of the Women Who Inspire Award, from the Canadian Council for Muslim Women. Born in Dubai, Shafi's family immigrated to Mississauga in 1996, and she currently lives and works in Toronto. It Begins With The Body is her first book.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Digial ARCs available July 2018.
        Tour: Toronto, Brampton, Hamilton, Ottawa, Calgary, Montreal
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Hana Shafi's work is a sigh of relief for the queer Muslim brown kid I was, and the queer
      Muslim brown adult I know am. It's the act of visibility, of being seen  through the words on a page that are so life affirming. I feel grateful  that I'm of a time where art like this is being made. It's relatable, it's a delight." —Fariha Róisín

      "Hana Shafi demonstrates herself as both a visual artist and poet. It's important for young girls to know we can express ourselves in many formats, sometimes simultaneously and that our complexities don't need to be distilled; they deserve to be expanded upon." —Alysha Brilla

  • 7
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    Ledi Kim Trainor Canada
    9781771664479 Paperback POETRY / Subjects & Themes Publication Date:October 10, 2018
    $18.00 CAD 5.75 x 8.75 x 0.25 in | 170 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:70 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Ledi, the second book by Vancouver-based poet Kim Trainor, describes the excavation of an Iron Age Pazyryk woman from her ice-bound grave in the steppes of Siberia. Along with the woman's carefully preserved body, with its blue tattoos of leopards and griffins, grave goods were also discovered--rosehips and wild garlic, translucent vessels carved from horn, snow-white felt stockings and coriander seeds for burning at death. The archaeologist who discovered her, Natalya Polosmak, called her 'Ledi'--'the Lady'--and it was speculated that she may have held a ceremonial position such as story teller or shaman within her tribe.

      Trainor uses this burial site to undertake the emotional excavation of the death of a former lover by suicide. This book-length poem presents a compelling story in the form of an archaeologist's notebook, a collage of journal entries, spare lyric poems, inventories, and images. As the poem relates the discovery of Ledi's gravesite, the narrator attempts simultaneously to reconstruct her own past relationship and the body of her lover.
      Bio
      Kim Trainor's first collection, Karyotype, was published by Brick Books in 2015. Her poetry has won the Gustafson Prize and the Malahat Review Long Poem Prize, and has appeared in the 2013 Global Poetry Anthology and The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2014. She lives in east Vancouver.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Tour: Vancouver, Victoria, Toronto
  • 8
    catalogue cover
    Branches Mark Truscott Canada
    9781771664516 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:September 21, 2018
    $18.00 CAD 5.25 x 8 x 0.15 in | 90 gr | 72 pages Carton Quantity:100 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Careful attention reveals that, even in moments that seem insignificant, our minds are constantly navigating disjunctions among registers of experience. Our intellect silently reminds our eyes that the car that appears to be moving between leaves is actually behind them and much larger. The sound of the vacuum cleaner in the next room is noise to be ignored. The phrase that arises in mind belongs to a conversation earlier in the day. Clear thinking demands that these navigations remain unconscious. But what if they're meaningful, or productive, in themselves? What if they're necessary to help us find a more meaningful place in the world? Branches explores these questions.
      Bio
      Mark Truscott is the author of two books of poetry: Said Like Reeds or Things (2004) and Nature (2010), which was shortlisted for the ReLit Award for Poetry. Poems from Branches have appeared in Event, The Walrus and on the Cultural Society website. Truscott was born in Bloomington, Indiana, grew up in Burlington and lives in Toronto.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Tour: Toronto, St. Catharines, Ottawa, Montreal
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Praise for Branches:

      "With their sonic precision and hyper-intelligence, the poems in Branches are wholly immersive. They slow the breath, loosen the mind, and dispel the self. Like Kay Ryan, Truscott has a knack for logical subversion, shifting perception seamlessly until one supposed certainty becomes another, and the foundation is not just shaken but obliterated. What we are left with is the expansiveness of pure potentiality

      Branches will change you, and for that it deserves your full attention." --Robin Richardson, author of Knife Throwing Through Self-Hypnosis and Sit How You Want

      Mark Truscott's Branches is a unique and assured meditative work, at once ancient and wholly contemporary, a space where Stevens, Ashbery, and Basho might mingle and discover some as-yet unnoticed path. "There are smooth surfaces it seems one can only buy," Truscott adroitly observes. Branches is full of lines ready to take root and reward, allowing perception all its richness but also changing and transforming it with a graceful and almost natural pressure. Reader, these poems are the furthest thing from those surfaces." --Jeff Latosik, author of Dreampad
  • 9
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    Ritualites, The Michael Nardone Canada
    9781771664554 Paperback POETRY / Subjects & Themes Publication Date:October 26, 2018
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.25 in | 160 gr | 140 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The Ritualites is Michael Nardone's book-length poem on the sonic topography of North America.

      Composed over ten years at sites all across the continent--from Far Rockaway to the Olympic Peninsula, Great Bear Lake to the Gulf of California--the book documents the poet's listening amid our public exchanges, mediated ambiances, and itinerant intimacies. The Ritualites is a series
      of linguistic rituals that shift, page to page, through a range of forms and genres--a rhapsodic text for occasional singing and a best-selling thriller, a self-help guide and sabotage manual, a score
      for solo performance and a cacophony of voices.
      Bio

      Michael Nardone is a writer and editor based in Montreal. He is the author of the chapbooks Airport Novel (2015), Transaction Record (2014), O. Cyrus &the Bardo (2012),and Us, People (2011). His poetry has won the Lemon Hound Prose Poem Prize and was a finalist for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry. His essays, dialogues, and editorial projects have been published widely, and are archived at http://soundobject.net. The Ritualites is his first book.


      Marketing & Promotion
        Tour: Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      The Ritualites is a spellbinding collection of North America’s sonic architecture and
      Nardone is a poet of its topologies, listening to the air when the body stops. The Ritualites is the jukebox of place; embodied leakages of the night, the shout, the cry and the laughter. A poetics of what language lays bare: little panic breaths, sound permitted in a cell. In The Ritualites, Nardone reminds us that language is wielded and listening is a verb." —Jordan Scott

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    9781771664592 Paperback POETRY / Subjects & Themes Publication Date:November 02, 2018
    $18.00 CAD 4.9 x 7.9 x 0.4 in | 160 gr | 120 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Fraught with fatal mishaps and disastrous near misses, the missions of the space race between the Soviet Union and the United States defined an era and exemplified the global socio-political conflict of the Cold War. The Lost Cosmonauts by Ken Hunt is an elegy to humanity's fledgling efforts to explore outer space, and to those who lost their lives in pursuit of this goal.

      This wide-ranging collection of poems looks deep into the largely unexplored cosmos for experiences of the sublime, not only in celestial bodies and mythical figures among the stars, but also in those astronauts and cosmonauts who dared to explore them.
      Bio
      Ken Hunt's writing has appeared in Chromium Dioxide, No Press, Matrix and Freefall. For three years, Ken served as managing editor of NoD Magazine, and for one year, he served as poetry editor of filling Station. Ken holds an MA in English from Concordia University, and is the founder of Spacecraft Press, an online publisher of experimental writing inspired by science and technology. He lives in Calgary.
      Marketing & Promotion

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