Canada Reads 2014

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Series: The MaddAddam Trilogy
    The Year of the Flood Margaret Atwood Canada
    9780307397980 Paperback FICTION / General On Sale Date: July 27, 2010
    $22.00 CAD 5.2 x 8 x 0.96 in | 448 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y Vintage Canada
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      From the Booker Prize–winning author of Oryx and Crake, the first book in the MaddAddam Trilogy, and The Handmaid’s Tale. Internationally acclaimed as ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR by, amongst others, the Globe and Mail, the New York Times, the New Yorker, and the Village Voice

      In a world driven by shadowy, corrupt corporations and the uncontrolled development of new, gene-spliced life forms, a man-made pandemic occurs, obliterating human life. Two people find they have unexpectedly survived: Ren, a young dancer locked inside the high-end sex club Scales and Tails (the cleanest dirty girls in town), and Toby, solitary and determined, who has barricaded herself inside a luxurious spa, watching and waiting. The women have to decide on their next move--they can’t stay hidden forever. But is anyone else out there?

      Bio

      Margaret Atwood is the author of more than forty volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction, but is best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman (1969), The Handmaid’s Tale (1985), The Robber Bride (1994), Alias Grace (1996), and The Blind Assassin, which won the prestigious Booker Prize in 2000. A book of short stories called Stone Mattress: Nine Tales was published in 2014. Her novel, MaddAddam (2013), is the final volume in a three-book series that began with the Man-Booker prize-nominated Oryx and Crake (2003) and continued with The Year of the Flood (2009). The Tent (mini-fictions) and Moral Disorder (short fiction) both appeared in 2006. A volume of poetry, The Door, was published in 2007. In Other Worlds: SF and the Human Imagination, a collection of non-fiction essays appeared in 2011. Her non-fiction book, Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth was adapted for the screen in 2012. Ms. Atwood’s work has been published in more than forty languages, including Farsi, Japanese, Turkish, Finnish, Korean, Icelandic and Estonian.
      Margaret Atwood lives in Toronto with writer Graeme Gibson.
      www.margaretatwood.ca

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2011, Nominated
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2009, Nominated
      Trillium Book Award 2010, Short-listed
      Reviews
      #1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER
      FINALIST FOR THE TRILLIUM BOOK AWARD
      FINALIST FOR CBC CANADA READS
      LONGLISTED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL IMPAC DUBLIN LITERARY AWARD
      LONGLISTED FOR THE SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE
      A
      Globe and Mail Best Book
      A New York Times Notable Book


      “A gripping and visceral book that showcases Atwood’s pure storytelling talents.” The New York Times

      “A heart-pounding thriller.” The Washington Post

      “Atwood is funny and clever. [She] knows how to show us ourselves, but the mirror she holds up to life does more than reflect.... The Year of the Flood isn’t prophecy, but it is eerily possible.” The New York Times Book Review

      “A gripping read, revealing Atwood in her most masterful storytelling mode.... The book is a cracked mirror of the times we live in.” The Gazette
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    The Orenda Joseph Boyden Canada
    9780670064182 Hardcover FICTION / General On Sale Date: September 10, 2013
    $32.00 CAD 6.29 x 9.24 x 1.54 in | 496 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y Hamish Hamilton
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A visceral portrait of life at a crossroads, The Orenda opens with a brutal massacre and the kidnapping of the young Iroquois Snow Falls, a spirited girl with a special gift. Her captor, Bird, is an elder and one of the Huron Nation’s great warriors and statesmen. It has been years since the murder of his family, and yet they are never far from his mind. In Snow Falls, Bird recognizes the ghost of his lost daughter and sees that the girl possesses powerful magic that will be useful to him on the troubled road ahead. Bird’s people have battled the Iroquois for as long as he can remember, but both tribes now face a new, more dangerous threat from afar. 

       Christophe, a charismatic Jesuit missionary, has found his calling among the Huron, and devotes himself to learning and understanding their customs and language in order to lead them to Christ. An emissary from distant lands, he brings much more than his faith to the new world.

      As these three souls dance with each other through intricately woven acts of duplicity, small battles erupt into bigger wars and a nation emerges from worlds in flux. 

      Bio
      JOSEPH BOYDEN's first novel, Three Day Road, was selected for the Today Show Book Club, won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the CBA Libris Fiction Book of the Year Award, the Amazon.ca/Books in Canada First Novel Award, and the McNally Robinson Aboriginal Book of the Year Award, and was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. His second novel, Through Black Spruce, was awarded the Scotiabank Giller Prize and named the Canadian Booksellers Association Fiction Book of the Year; it also earned him the CBA’s Author of the Year Award. His most recent novel, The Orenda, won Canada Reads and was nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. Boyden divides his time between Northern Ontario and Louisiana.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Canada Reads 2014, Winner
      Governor General's Literary Awards - Fiction 2013, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2013
      Reviews
      "Every so often, a book can bring the past back to life so vividly that it ceases to be history and becomes a part of the living world. Joseph Boyden has done this with haunting beauty and visceral strength, repopulating a destroyed world with characters so real and striking it is hard to think of them as fictional. The Orenda is not only Boyden's finest work, it is one of the most powerful novels I've ever read." - Steven Galloway, The Cellist of Sarajevo

      “Joseph Boyden has taken our memory of the past – myth and fact – ripped it inside out with elegance, violence, emotion and understanding until before us stands a new myth, a new memory, of how we became who we are.” - John Ralston Saul

      “The Orenda is a powerful story from history, folklore and the imagination, based on the universality of human cruelty, superstition and perseverance. Wonderful writing.” - Linden MacIntyre, Giller Prize-winning author of The Bishop's Man

      “An important and engrossing novel. Boyden invites the reader to re-imagine a Canadian story you thought you knew.” - Jim Balsillie, Co-Founder Blackberry

      “I have spent almost forty years of my life studying both the archaeology of the Huron-Wendat and the annual accounts of the Crows and only now, having read Joseph Boyden's brilliant novel, do I feel the majesty and the horrors of the lives of these people. His work should be required reading for every Canadian” - Dr. Ronald F. Williamson, co-author of The Mantle Site: An Archaeological History of an Ancestral Wendat Community and Managing Partner of Archaeological Services Inc.

      “Boyden’s bloody and brick-thick new novel, The Orenda, is a historical epic about an idealistic missionary caught between warring tribes, hundreds of years before confederation. . . Full of head-bludgeoning and throat-cutting scenes set in the wilds of what is now Ontario, the novel feels like a hybrid of Pierre Berton and Cormac McCarthy: perfect for readers who like a little arterial spray with their history.” - Toronto Life

      “The Orenda illuminates the shadowy moment of our inception as a country. It forces us to bravely consider who we are. The Orenda is much more than a timely novel. It is a timeless one; born a classic.” - National Post

      "A stunning, masterful work of staggering depth, possibly the first truly great Canadian novel of this century." - Vancouver Sun

      "In what has already been a banner year for Canadian fiction, Joseph Boyden has just stepped decisively to the head of the class." - Montreal Gazette

      "An epic worthy of Herodotus or Sima Qian…The Orenda declares it an equal to any ancient Greek or Chinese account of empires rising and falling. . . a great, heartbreaking novel, full of fierce action and superb characters and an unblinking humanity." - Globe and Mail

      “Epic in scope, exquisite in execution . . . A fascinating glimpse of what it felt like to live at the sharp end of the spear of European conquest.” - Publisher’s Weekly
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Half-Blood Blues Esi Edugyan Canada
    9781443433471 Paperback FICTION / General Publication Date: November 12, 2013
    $19.99 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.8 in | 320 pages Carton Quantity: 44 HarperCollins Publishers
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The brilliant, bestselling, Giller Prize–winning novel

      Esi Edugyan’s Half-Blood Blues took the literary world by storm when it was first published, captivating readers and reviewers with its audacity, power, and sheer brilliance. The novel won or was nominated for every literary prize in Canada—and many international ones, too, including the prestigious Man Booker Prize. It was hailed as one of the best books of the year by Oprah, The Globe and Mail, Amazon, The San Francisco Chronicle and The Vancouver Sun, and it was named a New York Times Editor’s Choice.

      From the smoky bars of pre-war Berlin to the salons of Paris, the narrator of Half-Blood Blues, musician Sid Griffiths, leads the reader through a fascinating, little-known world and into the heart of his own guilty conscience. The bestselling, award-winning Half-Blood Blues is an entrancing, electric story about jazz, race, love and loyalty, and the sacrifices we ask of ourselves—and demand of others—in the name of art.

      Bio

      Esi Edugyan is the author of the novels The Second Life of Samuel Tyne and Half-Blood Blues, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Orange Prize. In 2014, she published her first book of non-fiction, Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia, with her husband and two children.

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  • 4
    catalogue cover
    Cockroach Rawi Hage Canada
    9780887848346 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: August 01, 2009
    $19.95 CAD 5.3 x 8 x 0.8 in | 320 pages Carton Quantity: 41 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Cockroach is as urgent, unsettling, and brilliant as Rawi Hage's bestselling and critically acclaimed first book, De Niro's Game.

      The novel takes place during one month of a bitterly cold winter in Montreal's restless immigrant community, where a self-described thief has just tried but failed to commit suicide. Rescued against his will, the narrator is obliged to attend sessions with a well-intentioned but naive therapist. This sets the story in motion, leading us back to the narrator's violent childhood in a war-torn country, forward into his current life in the smoky emigre cafes where everyone has a tale, and out into the frozen night-time streets of Montreal, where the thief survives on the edge, imagining himself to be a cockroach invading the lives of the privileged, but wilfully blind, citizens who surround him.

      In 2008, Cockroach was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General's Literary Award, and the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize. It won the Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction, presented by the Quebec Writers' Federation.

      Bio

      Rawi Hage was born in Beirut, Lebanon, and lived through nine years of the Lebanese civil war. His debut novel, De Niro's Game, won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, was a finalist for numerous prestigious national and international awards, including the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General's Literary Award, and has been translated into several languages and published around the world. His second novel, Cockroach, won the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General's Literary Award, and the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize. Rawi Hage lives in Montreal.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2010, Long-listed
      Governor General's Literary Awards: Fiction 2008, Short-listed
      Grand Prix du Livre de Montreal 2008, Winner
      QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction 2008, Winner
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2008, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2008, Short-listed
      Globe and Mail Top 100 Best Books of the Year 2008, Commended
      Reviews
      ...Cockroach is the kind of alienated-outsider book the just don't write anymore...While his narrator stumbles through existence, cleaning toilets, and going in and out of lucid and devastating observations, Hage subtly builds a thriller in the background that climaxes written Jim Thompson-cold.
      [Hage is] an immensely talented writer [who presents a] fascinating portrait of a complex character who is not sure he's human.
      Cockroach echoes Hage's trademark concern for life's losers, for the dispossessed, the troubled and the despairing...In a novel laced with dark humour and scorn for the complacency toward suffering in contemporary society, Hage dissects the immigrant experience with incisiveness and a good degree of aplomb.
      Cockroach is an unforgettable, good read.
      Hage has done it again. He has produced an amazingly original and brilliant novel that shows he is no one-hit wonder, but a major force in Canadian literature.
      The best novel I read this year was Rawi Hage's Cockroach...which tells the story of an ungrateful immigrant, filled with angst and attitude, in a Montreal which could be Kafka's Prague. It is a dark book, narrated with verve and brilliance. It made me jump for joy.
      The things that make Rawi Hage a major literary talent - and Cockroach as essential reading as its predecessor [De Niro's Game] - include freshness, gut wrenching lyricism, boldness, emotional restraint, intellectual depth, historical sense, political subversiveness and uncompromising compassion.
      ...a tour de force novel of fearsome wit, skilled prose, and impressive imagination...A beautiful, compelling, original work, one of the finest novels of the year.
      Cockroach reveals Hage to be no mere fluke, but a fearless talent with his best years ahead.
      Hage is definitely the real deal...[Cockroach is] powerful, poetic...a near-thriller; you won't be able to put it down...The prose is tight, the haunting imagery beautiful and unsettling, and the setting vividly evoked.
      Hage's largest debt is naturally to Kafka, but in grating these influences onto a Montreal immigrant's story, he has managed to recontextualize and transcend them...a potent, honest dissection of material that is too often ignored by Canadian writers.
      Hage's look at the underbelly of organized religion and immigrant life in Canada is unflinching and grim; what's even more remarkable is that he has transformed that material into a page-turner. Cockroach's finely wrought scenes build in tension toward a conclusion that's fitting and yet unpredictable...Readers are bound to be seduced.
  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Series: Anansi Book Club Editions
    Annabel Anansi Book Club edition Kathleen Winter Canada
    9780887842900 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: February 26, 2011
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8 x 1.15 in | 480 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General's Award for Fiction, and the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize

      In 1968, into the beautiful, spare environment of remote coastal Labrador, a mysterious child is born: a baby who appears to be neither fully boy nor girl, but both at once.

      Only three people are privy to the secret — the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to raise the child as a boy named Wayne. But as Wayne grows to adulthood within the hyper-masculine hunting culture of his father, his shadow-self — a girl he thinks of as "Annabel" — is never entirely extinguished, and indeed is secretly nurtured by the women in his life.

      Haunting, sweeping in scope, and stylistically reminiscent of Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex, Annabel is a compelling tale about one person's struggle to discover the truth about their birth and self in a culture that shuns contradiction.

      Bio
      Kathleen Winter is the author of the international bestseller, Annabel, which was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the Orange Prize for Fiction, and CBC’s Canada Reads. Her first collection of stories, boys, won both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf–Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John’s, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal.
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    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      New York Times Editors' Choice 2011, Commended
      Globe and Mail Top 100 Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Quill and Quire Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Amazon.ca Best Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Amazon.ca First Novel Award 2011, Short-listed
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2010, Short-listed
      Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize 2010, Short-listed
      Governor General's Award: Fiction 2010, Short-listed
      Vancouver Sun Top 10 Canadian Books of the Year 2010, Commended
      Independent Literary Awards 2010, Winner
      OLA Evergreen Award 2011, Short-listed
      CBC Bookies: Best Overall Book 2011, Short-listed
      CBC Bookies: Best Scene 2011, Short-listed
      Orange Prize for Fiction 2011, Short-listed
      Thomas Head Raddall Atlantic Fiction Award 2011, Winner
      ReLit Awards: Novel 2011, Long-listed
      IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2011, Long-listed
      Reviews
      The Montreal-based Winter, a native of Newfoundland, possesses a rare blend of lyrical brilliance, descriptive power and psychological and philosophical insight...A compelling, gracefully written novel about mixed gender that sheds insight as surely as it rejects sensationalism. This book announces the arrival of a major writer.
      ...a sprawling book filled with musical prose...
      [Kathleen Winter's] lyrical voice and her crystalline landscape are enchanting.
      Reminiscent of Jeffrey Eugenides' magnificent 2002 novel Middlesex, Winter's treatment of such a delicate issue is amazing and incredibly engaging. Her novel is written with immense sensitivity and grace, not to be missed.
      Read it because it's a story told with sensitivity to language that compels to the last page, and read it because it asks the most existential of questions. Stripped of the trappings of gender, [Kathleen] Winter asks, what are we?
      . . . utterly original . . . a haunting story of family, identity, and the universal yearning to belong.
      Annabel's strength lies in probing the dilemma of sexuality and self-knowledge. I have never read such an intimate portrait of a person struggling to live inside a self that the world sees as a dreadful mistake.
      Annabel is a stunning and stirring debut that signals the long-overdue arrival of a literary talent.
      Annabel is an unforgettable novel of struggles, personal and inter-personal, and Winter's empathetic voice does them justice in a way that connects reader to story. Destined to be one of the biggest novels out of Newfoundland this year, this is a story of isolation and a communication breakdown that breaks a family down, and breaks the reader down along with them.
      A book like this, its topic and beautiful language, the unrelenting sorrow, Winter's insightful characterizations and utter sensitivity, is difficult to do justice to with these few words. I simply want to tell people: read this book. Read it though you know little or nothing about its subject or the author. It will open you up. It will change you.
      . . . Annabel is a novel about divisions, not only between the sexes but also between social classes and, perhaps most crucially, ways of being . . . Winter does a deft job of developing all the characters fully and making their motives understandable . . . It's to Winter's credit that both the fear and the beauty are given vivid expression in this finely crafted novel.
      . . . a poignant and powerful first novel . . .
      This is a remarkable first novel, an accomplished debut by an exciting new voice with a confident, mature style.
      . . . beautifully paced, sometimes shocking and never prurient.
      Winter's dazzling debut addresses the riddle of gender and the tragedy of conformity with astonishing insight and eloquence.
      . . . a confident, serious debut.
      . . . a captivating romantic novel with a happy ending.
      ...a stunning novel, one of the rare kind that might well imbed itself permanently in a reader's psyche.

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