Simon & Schuster Canada - Adult - Summer 2019

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Ask Again, Yes A Novel Canadian Export Mary Beth Keane
    9781982129873 Paperback FICTION / Family Life Publication Date: May 28, 2019
    $24.99 CAD 152.4 x 228.6 x 25.4 mm | 400 pages Carton Quantity: 20 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      “A beautiful novel, bursting at the seams with empathy.”Elle

      A profoundly moving novel about two neighboring families in a suburban town, the friendship between their children, a tragedy that reverberates over four decades, the daily intimacies of marriage, and the power of forgiveness.

      How much can a family forgive?

      Francis Gleeson and Brian Stanhope, rookie cops in the NYPD, live next door to each other outside the city. What happens behind closed doors in both houses—the loneliness of Francis’s wife, Lena, and the instability of Brian’s wife, Anne, sets the stage for the explosive events to come.

      Ask Again, Yes is a deeply affecting exploration of the lifelong friendship and love that blossoms between Kate Gleeson and Peter Stanhope, born six months apart. One shocking night their loyalties are divided, and their bond will be tested again and again over the next 40 years. Luminous, heartbreaking, and redemptive, Ask Again, Yes reveals the way childhood memories change when viewed from the distance of adulthood—villains lose their menace and those who appeared innocent seem less so. Kate and Peter’s love story, while haunted by echoes from the past, is marked by tenderness, generosity, and grace.
      Bio
      Mary Beth Keane attended Barnard College and the University of Virginia, where she received an MFA. She has been named one of the National Book Foundation’s “5 under 35,” and was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship for fiction writing. She currently lives in Pearl River, New York with her husband and their two sons. She is the author of The Walking People, Fever, and Ask Again, Yes.
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  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Ask Again, Yes A Novel Mary Beth Keane
    9781982106980 Hardcover FICTION / Family Life Publication Date: May 28, 2019
    $36.00 CAD 152.4 x 228.6 x 27.94 mm | 400 pages Carton Quantity: 20 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

      **The Tonight Show Summer Reads Pick**

      “One of the most unpretentiously profound books I've read in a long time…modestly magnificent.” —Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air

      “A beautiful novel, bursting at the seams with empathy.” —Elle

      How much can a family forgive?

      A profoundly moving novel about two neighboring families in a suburban town, the friendship between their children, a tragedy that reverberates over four decades, the daily intimacies of marriage, and the power of forgiveness.

      Francis Gleeson and Brian Stanhope, rookie cops in the NYPD, live next door to each other outside the city. What happens behind closed doors in both houses—the loneliness of Francis’s wife, Lena, and the instability of Brian’s wife, Anne, sets the stage for the explosive events to come.

      Ask Again, Yes is a deeply affecting exploration of the lifelong friendship and love that blossoms between Kate Gleeson and Peter Stanhope, born six months apart. One shocking night their loyalties are divided, and their bond will be tested again and again over the next 40 years. Luminous, heartbreaking, and redemptive, Ask Again, Yes reveals the way childhood memories change when viewed from the distance of adulthood—villains lose their menace and those who appeared innocent seem less so. Kate and Peter’s love story, while haunted by echoes from the past, is marked by tenderness, generosity, and grace.
      Bio
      Mary Beth Keane attended Barnard College and the University of Virginia, where she received an MFA. She has been named one of the National Book Foundation’s “5 under 35,” and was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship for fiction writing. She currently lives in Pearl River, New York with her husband and their two sons. She is the author of The Walking People, Fever, and Ask Again, Yes.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “One of the most unpretentiously profound books I've read in a long time… Keane writes with deep familiarity and precision about the lives of this particular generation… As a writer, Keane reminds me a lot of Ann Patchett: Both have the magical ability to seem to be telling ‘only’ a closely-observed domestic tale that transforms into something else deep and, yes, universal. In Keane's case, that ‘something else’ is a story about forgiveness and acceptance… modestly magnificent.”
      Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air
      “A beautiful novel, bursting at the seams with empathy.”
      Brianna Kovan, Elle
      "Keane’s novel is a rare example of propulsive storytelling with profound insights about blame, forgiveness and abiding love.” --People Magazine
      “A profound story... Keane’s gracefully restrained prose gives her characters dignity... shows how difficult forgiveness can be—and how it amounts to a kind of hard-won grace.” --Vogue
      “Keane writes with acute sensitivity and her characters are consistently, authentically lived-in. . . . smartly told.” –Entertainment Weekly
      "I devoured this astonishing tale of two families linked by chance, love, and tragedy. Mary Beth Keane gives us characters so complex and alive that I find myself still thinking of them days after turning the final page. A must-read."
      —J. Courtney Sullivan, author of Saints for All Occasions
      “Mary Beth Keane takes on one of the most difficult problems in fiction—how to write about human decency. In Ask Again, Yes, Keane creates a layered emotional truth that makes a compelling case for compassion over blame, understanding over grudge, and the resilience of hearts that can accept the contradictions of love.”
      Louise Erdrich, author of The Round House
      “Ask Again, Yes is a powerful and moving novel of family, trauma, and the defining moments in people’s lives. Mary Beth Keane is a writer of extraordinary depth, feeling and wit. Readers will love this book, as I did.”
      —Meg Wolitzer, author of The Female Persuasion
      “Remarkable.”
      Booklist
      “Mary Beth Keane looks past the veneer that covers ordinary moments and into the very heart of real life. There’s a Tolstoyan gravity, insight, and moral heft in these pages, and Keane’s ability to plumb the depths of authentic feeling while avoiding sentimentality leaves one shaking one’s head in frank admiration. This wonderful book is so many things: a gripping family drama; a sensitive meditation on mental illness; a referendum on the power and cost of loyalty; a ripping yarn that takes us down into the depths and back up; in short, a triumph.”
      Matthew Thomas, author of We Are Not Ourselves
      “Keane's story embraces family lives in all their muted, ordinary, yet seismic shades… offers empathy and the long view… Tender and patient, the novel avoids excessive sweetness while planting itself deep in the soil of commitment and attachment. Graceful and mature. A solidly satisfying, immersive read.”
      Kirkus (starred review)
      “Thoughtful, compassionate… illustrates the mutability of memory and the softening effects of time… poignantly demonstrates how grace can emerge from forgiveness.”
      Publishers Weekly
      “Mary Beth Keane is at the height of her powers in this novel about the sacrifices we make when we choose to build a life with someone. In Ask Again Yes, Keane tells a story about the fragility of happiness, the violence lurking beneath everyday life, and, ultimately, the power of love. If you’ve ever loved someone beyond reason, you will love this wise, tender, and beautiful book.”
      Eleanor Henderson, author of Ten Thousand Saints
      “Mary Beth Keane combines Joan Didion's exacting eye for detail with the emotional wallop of Alice McDermott. From the ache of first love to the recognition that the people closest to us are flawed and human, Ask Again, Yes is a moving testament to the necessary act of forgiveness. It is heartbreaking, hopeful, and honest.”
      —Brendan Mathews, author of The World of Tomorrow
      "Beautifully observed. . . . Ask Again, Yes is a tale that will compel readers to think deeply about the ravages of unacknowledged mental illness, questions of family love and loyalty, and the arduous journey towards forgiveness.” --BookPage, starred review
      "Stunning! An absolutely brilliant, gorgeously-written novel by a fearless writer. Ask Again, Yes is both haunting and hopeful, like life itself. It's the consummate epic family story, one I can't stop thinking and talking about. A must-read for our time." --Lisa Taddeo, author of Three Women
      "Her characters are flawed, thoughtful, hard-working people trying to make sense of ordinary and sometimes impossible events, and dealing with the ripple effects of the past on the present... a thought-provoking family drama and a testament to the power of forgiveness." --Shelf Awareness
      “A gut-wrenching tale.”
      GMA.com
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Something Old, Something New Oysters Rockefeller, Walnut Souffle, and Other Classic Recipes Revisited Tamar Adler, Mindy Dubin
    9781982113995 Paperback COOKING / Regional & Ethnic Publication Date: August 06, 2019
    $25.00 CAD 139.7 x 212.72 x 20.32 mm | 288 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The award-winning, bestselling author of An Everlasting Meal “revitalizes classics and long-forgotten dishes, bringing them into this century with verve and ease” (Bon Appetit) in this “lovely and literary” (Vogue.com) cookbook.

      Many dishes that once excited our palates—like oysters Rockefeller, steak Diane, cheese and walnut soufflés—have disappeared from our tables and, in some cases, from our memories. Creating a unique culinary history, Tamar Adler, a Vogue and New York Times writer and Chez Panisse alum, has collected more than a hundred recipes from old cookbooks and menus and enlivened, updated, and simplified them.

      Adler’s approach to these dishes involves ample use of acid and herbs, pared down techniques, and contemporary ways of serving. Seasonal menus, wine pairings suggested by sommelier Juliette Pope, gorgeous watercolor drawings by artist Mindy Dubin, and a foreword by influential food critic Mimi Sheraton add to this “personal, nostalgic journey…as much about the writing as it is about the cooking” (The New York Times Book Review). Adler has created a unique culinary history, filled with delicious recipes and smart, witty prose. It is destined to become a modern classic.
      Bio
      Tamar Adler is a contributing editor to Vogue. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, the NewYorker.com, and other publications. Adler has won a James Beard Award and an IACP Award, and is the author of An Everlasting Meal and Something Old, Something New. She lives in Hudson, New York.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Tamar Adler is a curious magpie, skillfully collecting culinary ephemera from across the ages and weaving them into an unimaginably beautiful nest. Step inside. You'll find yourself comforted and inspired by the writing and the food, both equally sensible and elegant."
      Samin Nosrat, author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat
      "Adler is a peaceable cook, and a pragmatic one... Her economizing ethos shines in her new book."
      The Washington Post
      Tamar Adler is more than a wonderful food writer—she is a wonderful writer. She delves into these past and forgotten recipes with the spirit of an adventurer and a sleuth, and while writing about food, she is always secretly writing about something else—a love of life, eternal values, industry, thrift, friendship, the unknown. Her books—written with a charmingly loose confidence and care—feel timeless. Even those of us who never cook, or don’t give meals much thought, will find enduring literary pleasure in Something Old, Something New.”
      Sheila Heti, author of How Should a Person Be?
      "Home cooks looking to adventure into the past will find much to enjoy with these refound recipes."
      —Library Journal, (starred review)
      "Revitalizes fusty classics and long-forgotten dishes, bringing them into this century with verve and ease... it’s bookery meets cookery."
      Christine Muhlke, Bon Appetit
      "A personal, nostalgic journey inspiring the rediscovery of classics... as much about the writing as it is about the cooking... lyrical."
      Jenny Rosenstrach, The New York Times Book Review
      "Adler has a curious intelligence and technical command to back up a thoughtful approach to classic French dishes, which reimagines what might be produced out of a home kitchen... Any cook looking to exercise and enhance creativity will find in Adler a worthy muse."
      Booklist
      "What a delight this book is. It reminded me of half-forgotten treats and made me nostalgic for things I've never actually tasted. But most of all, I treasure Something Old, Something New for the writing, which is as suave and fun to read as M.F.K. Fisher. Adler is the best kind of kitchen companion, someone whose warm and witty voice I want to carry with me as I cook."
      Bee Wilson, author of Consider the Fork
      "Her writing is lyrical and lovely—and thorough and authoritative."
      Food 52
      "A lovely and literary cookbook... handsome and witty and personal, full of glimpses into Adler's life." --Vogue.com
  • 4
    catalogue cover
    How to Build a Boat A Father, His Daughter, and the Unsailed Sea Jonathan Gornall
    9781501199394 Hardcover BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs Publication Date: May 07, 2019
    $35.00 CAD 139.7 x 212.72 x 25.4 mm | 336 pages Carton Quantity: 20 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Part ode to building something with one’s hands in the modern age, part celebration of the beauty and function of boats, and part moving father-daughter story, How to Build a Boat is a bold adventure.

      Once an essential skill, the ability to build a clinker boat, first innovated by the Vikings, can seem incomprehensible today. Yet it was the clinker, with its overlapping planks, that afforded us access to the oceans, and its construction has become a lost art that calls to the do-it-yourselfer in all of us. John Gornall heard the call.

      A thoroughly unskilled modern man, Gornall set out to build a traditional wooden boat as a gift for his newborn daughter. It was, he recognized, a ridiculously quixotic challenge for a man who knew little about woodworking and even less about boat-building. He wasn’t even sure what type of wood he should use, the tools he’d need, or where on earth he'd build the boat. He had much to consider…and even more to learn.

      But, undaunted, he embarked on a voyage of rediscovery, determined to navigate his way back to a time when we could fashion our future and leave our mark on history using only time-honored skills and the materials at hand. His journey began in East Anglia, on England’s rocky eastern coast. If all went according to plan, it would end with a great adventure, as father and daughter cast off together for a voyage of discovery that neither would forget, and both would treasure until the end of their days.

      How to Build a Boat celebrates the art of boat-building, the simple pleasures of working with your hands, and the aspirations and glory of new fatherhood. John Gornall “tells the inspiring story of how even the least skilled of us can make something wonderful if we invest enough time and love” (The Daily Mail) and taps into the allure of an ancient craft, interpreting it in a modern way, as tribute to the generations yet to come. “Both the book, and place, are magical” (The Sunday Telegraph).
      Bio
      Jonathan Gornall is an award-winning freelance journalist, whose writing has appeared in The Daily Mail and The Times (London). While at The Times, he was the author of a weekly column, “Microwave Man,” that looked insightfully, and often humorously, at the role of man in the modern world. He published a book of the same title in 2006. He has twice attempted to row across the Atlantic, and lives on England’s east coast with his wife and daughter. 
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “From struggle and suffering comes beauty. From countless mistakes, ounces of spilled blood and gallons of sweat comes something simple and enduring; practical yet elegant . . . This is where Gornall shines. Like every parent—no, more than most—he is fixated on what he will leave behind . . . He wants to leave his child an ark. Not the Noah kind, but the Moses kind. A tangible vessel to hold timeless truths . . . It is when he directly addresses Phoebe that Gornall truly sets sail . . . I am grateful as a father that a dad has put into words and wood the fathomless love a parent has for a child.”
      —New York Times Book Review
      “Beautifully documents the year [journalist Jonathan Gornall] spent building a wooden boat for his young daughter . . . Owning almost no tools and having no woodworking skills, Gornall, living on England’s eastern coast, gave himself a crash course . . . [His] prose is amusing, personal, and informative . . . [He] acknowledges he has ‘created a vessel of a father’s love, a gift to inspire his daughter.’ The very same can be said of his book, a testament to hard work and a soft heart.”
      —Publishers Weekly
      “Engrossing . . . Gornall lends depth to the story with engaging bits of boat history, recollections of his two aborted attempts to row across the Atlantic Ocean, and a surprisingly compassionate account of growing up with an emotionally distant, alcoholic single mother. But the most touching emotions are the author's fervent, overriding love for his daughter (with the boat as its embodiment) and his regret that he had not been more of a father to his now-grown son. . . . At its best, Gornall's prose is buoyant and watertight and his book shipshape.”
      —Kirkus Reviews
      “With delightful self-deprecating wit and the enthusiasm of a devotee, Gornall recalls his massive undertaking, celebrating the kindred spirits who signed on to help him on his way, the history of traditional boatbuilding, and even the mercurial attention his daughter pays to the project. With all the pitfalls and setbacks Gornall experiences along the way, his commitment to his one-of-a-kind gift makes for an inspiring journey.”
      —Booklist
      “Both the book, and place, are magical.”
      —The Sunday Telegraph
      “Tells the inspiring story of how even the least skilled of us can make something wonderful if we invest enough time and love.”
      —The Daily Mail
      “The passages Gornall addresses directly to [his daughter] are as tender as the father-daughter letters in Karl Ove Knausgaard’s Seasons Quartet.”
      —Times Literary Supplement
      “In an age of instant everything, this is a charming book about handcrafting something that does not arrive in a cardboard box and snap together. It is a story about taming impatience, facing fears, and softening skepticism. With love as a motivation, each of us may undertake things that seem impossible.”
      —Tori Murden McClure, author of A Pearl in the Storm, and the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean
      “This rich, beautifully crafted book is funny, heart-warming and stuffed to the gunwales with fascinating information. Jonathan Gornall’s quest to build a sailing boat navigates the crosscurrents of his life story—the challenges of fatherhood, his difficult relationship with his mother, his lifelong love of the sea. It’s a compelling narrative that sweeps us along as Gornall battles his demons while simultaneously tackling the tough physical challenges of building a vessel from scratch.”
      Benedict Tufnell, Editor of Row360 magazine
      “An utterly captivating, richly poetic account of building a traditional wooden boat for the first time—and a paean to the awesome responsibility and reward of fatherhood.”
      —Matthew P. Murphy, Editor, WoodenBoat magazine
      “Being a parent, a sailor and an occasional DIYer, I know that boat building, like fatherhood, is not for the faint of heart. Packed with details, both historical and personal, How to Build a Boat wonderfully captures the tensions, the tightrope walk between reward and dismay. In the end, I wanted to cheer: the boat floats and a daughter's adventures can begin.”
      —Mark Pillsbury, Editor of Cruising World
  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Night Hawks Stories Charles Johnson
    9781501184390 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date: May 07, 2019
    $22.00 CAD 133.35 x 203.2 x 10.16 mm | 192 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      From National Book Award winner Charles Johnson, “the celebrated novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, and essayist…comes a small treasure, one to be read and considered and reread” (The New York Times Book Review), showcasing his incredible range and resonant voice.

      Charles Johnson’s Night Hawks presents an eclectic, masterful collection of stories tied together by Buddhist themes and displaying all the grace, heart, and insight for which he has long been known. Spanning genres from science fiction to realism, “Johnson’s writing, filled with the sort of long, layered sentences you can get happily lost in, conveys a kindness; a sense that all of us…have our own stories” (The Seattle Times).

      In “The Weave,” Ieesha and her boyfriend carry out a heist at the salon from which she has just been fired—coming away with thousands of dollars of merchandise in the form of hair extensions. “Night Hawks,” the titular story, draws on Johnson’s friendship with the late playwright August Wilson to construct a narrative about two writers who meet at night to talk. In “Kamadhatu,” a lonely Japanese abbot has his quiet world upended by a visit from a black American Buddhist whose presence pushes him toward the awakening he has long found elusive. “Occupying Arthur Whitfield,” about a cab driver who decides to rob the home of a wealthy passenger, reminds readers to be grateful for what they have. And “The Night Belongs to Phoenix Jones” combines the real-life story of a “superhero” in the city of Seattle with an invented narrative about an aging English professor who decides to join him.

      With precise, elegant, and moving language, Johnson creates an “arresting” array of “indelible moments that show Johnson to be a master of the short form” (Library Journal, starred review). Night Hawks is “a masterpiece…[that] ultimately offers a message of empowerment and hope” (Oprah.com).
      Bio
      Charles Johnson is a novelist, essayist, literary scholar, philosopher, cartoonist, screenwriter, and professor emeritus at the University of Washington in Seattle. A MacArthur fellow, his fiction includes Night HawksDr. King’s RefrigeratorDreamerFaith and the Good Thing, and Middle Passage, for which he won the National Book Award. In 2002 he received the Arts and Letters Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He lives in Seattle.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Johnson, the celebrated novelist, short story writer, screenwriter and essayist, here combines a finely tuned sense of humor with a desire to probe questions that lie at the heart of a reflective existence ... His book is a small treasure, one to be read and considered and reread."
      New York Times Book Review

      "Johnson’s writing, filled with the sort of long, layered sentences you can get happily lost in, conveys a kindness; a sense that all of us (particularly in “Occupying Arthur Whitfield” and “Welcome to Wedgwood”) have our own stories."
      Seattle Times

      "Best known for his masterful novels and essays, Johnson wrote this rare story collection over a period of 13 years—resulting in a masterpiece ... Unflinching in his observations, Johnson ultimately offers a message of empowerment and hope."
      Oprah.com

      "A treasure box."
      Newsday

      "Charles Johnson deftly weaves the funny with the philosophical."
      Lion's Roar

      "A modern master’s latest array of glittering tales offers the pleasures and solace of storytelling."
      Kirkus, starred

      "Arresting .. these are indelible moments that show Johnson to be a master of the short form. Highly recommended."
      Library Journal, starred

      "These striking stories from National Book Award–winner Johnson (Middle Passage) span a wide range of time periods and cultures but are woven together with a subtle thread of compassion."
      Publishers Weekly

      "This illuminating collection draws on Johnson's Buddhist faith, African American perspective, and aesthetic sensibilities."
      Booklist
  • 6
    catalogue cover
    The Mars Room A Novel Rachel Kushner
    9781476756585 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date: May 07, 2019
    $23.00 CAD 133.35 x 203.2 x 25.4 mm | 352 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      TIME’S #1 FICTION TITLE OF THE YEAR • NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018

      FINALIST for the MAN BOOKER PRIZE and the NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD

      LONGLISTED for the ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL

      An instant New York Times bestseller from two-time National Book Award finalist Rachel Kushner, The Mars Room earned tweets from Margaret Atwood—“gritty, empathic, finely rendered, no sugar toppings, and a lot of punches, none of them pulled”—and from Stephen King—“The Mars Room is the real deal, jarring, horrible, compassionate, funny.”

      It’s 2003 and Romy Hall, named after a German actress, is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: her young son, Jackson, and the San Francisco of her youth. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, portrayed with great humor and precision.

      Stunning and unsentimental, The Mars Room is “wholly authentic…profound…luminous” (The Wall Street Journal), “one of those books that enrage you even as they break your heart” (The New York Times Book Review, cover review)—a spectacularly compelling, heart-stopping novel about a life gone off the rails in contemporary America. It is audacious and tragic, propulsive and yet beautifully refined and “affirms Rachel Kushner as one of our best novelists” (Entertainment Weekly).
      Bio
      Rachel Kushner is the bestselling author of The Flamethrowers, a finalist for the National Book Award and a New York Times Top Ten Book of 2013; Telex from Cuba, a finalist for the National Book Award; and The Mars Room. She lives in Los Angeles.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “Like Denis Johnson in ‘Jesus’ Son,’ Kushner is on the lookout for bent moments of comic grace…The Mars Room is a major novel.”
      —Dwight Garner, The New York Times

      “Kushner uses the novel as a place to be flamboyant and funny, and to tell propulsive stories, but mainly as a capacious arena for thinking.”
      The New Yorker

      “[Rachel Kushner is] one of the most gifted novelists of her generation—on the same tier as Jennifer Egan and the two Jonathans, Franzen and Lethem…[The Mars Room is] a page turner… blackly comic…It’s one of those books that enrage you even as they break your heart.”
      —Charles McGrath, The New York Times Book Review (Cover Review)

      The Mars Room affirms Rachel Kushner as one of our best novelists…her stories slink in the margins, but they have the feel of something iconic.”
      —Leah Greenblatt, Entertainment Weekly
      “Kushner is a woman with the chops, ambition and killer instinct to rub shoulders with all those big, swinging male egos who routinely get worshipped as geniuses.”
      —John Powers, Fresh Air

      “[A] tough, prismatic and quite gripping novel…wholly authentic…profound…surprisingly luminous.”
      —Sam Sacks, The Wall Street Journal

      "A disturbing and atmospheric book...Ms Kushner makes the prison, and the world beyond its walls, vivid."
      The Economist

      "A searing, tragic look at life in the prison-industrial complex, covering poverty, sex work, mass incarceration, education, trauma, suffering, love, and redemption. Somehow, Kushner's rapid-fire, imaginative prose makes it seems effortless.”
      Vogue

      “Potent…an incendiary examination of flawed justice and the stacked deck of a system that entraps women who were born into poverty…The Mars Room is more than a novel; it’s an investigation, an exercise in empathy, an eyes-wide-open work of art.”
      —Kelly Luce, Oprah
      “[An] electrifying take on the chaos of 1980s San Francisco.”
      —Sloane Crosley, Vanity Fair

      “Phosphorescently vivid.”
      —Megan O’Grady, T Magazine

      “Superb and gritty… Kushner has an exceptional ability to be in the heads of her character."
      —Eve MacSweeney, Vogue

      "A powerful undertow pulls the reader through the book. I didn’t consume it so much as it consumed me, bite by bite..."
      —Laura Miller, Slate

      "Kushner's characters are so authentic and vividly drawn that with each new novel, it’s easy to assume she’s tapped out. Yet in The Mars Room, she brings to life another remarkable heroine."
      —Time Magazine
      “Kushner is a masterful world-creator, and her accomplishment here is unparalleled.”
      Nylon

      “Kushner’s writing and thinking are always invigorating, urgent, and painterly precise.”
      —Vulture

      “Stunning… a gorgeously written depiction of survival and the absurd and violent facets of life in prison.”
      Buzzfeed

      “Gorgeous…The Mars Room sings.”
      —Sasha Frere-Jones, Bookforum
      “A revelatory novel about women on the margins of society…it’s a true feat of Kushner’s extraordinary writing that such profound ugliness can result in such tumultuous beauty.”
      —Maris Kreizman, Vulture

      “Stunning…Heartbreaking and wholly original.”
      Bustle

      “A probing portrait of contemporary America.”
      Entertainment Weekly

      “Unflinching.”
      Elle

      “Kushner’s great gift is for the evocation of a scene, a time and place.”
      —Harper’s
      “Reading The Mars Room is a profoundly affecting experience, very nearly overwhelming, and yet it absolutely must be read. Kushner’s first two novels (Telex from Cuba, The Flamethrowers) were National Book Award finalists. It would be baffling if The Mars Room does not win this year’s.”
      —Cory Oldweiler, amNewYork

      “[A] stunning new book… Kushner deploys the masterful storytelling she’s known for…an unmistakable voice. “
      —Town and Country

      “Brilliant and devastating…Kushner doesn't make a false move in her third novel; she writes with an intelligence and a ferocity that sets her apart from most others in her cohort. She's a remarkably original and compassionate author, and The Mars Room is a heartbreaking, true and nearly flawless novel.”
      —Michael Schaub, NPR.org
      “An essential novel...Kushner is a bit of a magician, exploring bleak territory with pathos and urgency that makes it nearly impossible to stop reading.”
      AM New York

      “Kushner is both tough and darkly funny in writing about her characters’ situations, and she writes not so much for us to empathize with them, but rather to understand them. The Mars Room is a captivating and beautiful novel.”
      BookPage

      “Kushner's writing is clipped and sharp, as she tells the story of [Romy's] adjustment to life behind bars — and how she got there.”
      The Week

      “An enormously ambitious project profoundly rooted in a particular time and place… Kushner’s greatest achievement in this unique work of brilliance and rigor is to urge us all to take responsibility for the unconscionable state of the world in which we operate blithely every single day.”
      —Jennifer Croft, The Los Angeles Review of Books

      “Rachel Kushner cements her place as the most vital and interesting American novelist working today...The Mars Room makes most other contemporary fiction seem timid and predictable."
      —Michael Lindgren, The Millions
      “Absorbing…The Mars Room is impeccably researched without ever seeming dry or preachy… insightful…authoritative…haunting.”
      —Alexis Burling, San Francisco Chronicle

      "Kushner’s got the talent to justify the hype…The Mars Room builds to a redemption that comes from hard truth, sharp and broken and shaped by an author of exceptional power and grace.”
      —Jeff Baker, The Seattle Times

      “The book is beautifully written, without sentimentality or agenda, and at times even [with] a sly and dark humor.”
      —Holly Silva, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

      “Readers will savor every detail of Ms. Kushner’s descriptive passages, which bring ferocious beauty to even the ugliest surroundings."
      —Leigh Anne Focareta, The Pittsburgh Post Gazette

      “[Kushner is] an exceptionally talented and philosophically minded writer.”
      —Jessica Zack, The San Francisco Chronicle
      “Heartbreaking and unforgettable… [The Mars Room] deserves to be read with the same level of pathos, love, and humanity with which it clearly was written.”
      Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

      “Kushner, an acclaimed writer of exhilarating skills, has created a seductive narrator of tigerish intensity… This is a gorgeously eviscerating novel of incarceration writ large."
      Booklist, Starred Review

      “A searing look at life on the margins…This is, fundamentally, a novel about poverty and how our structures of power do not work for the poor, and Kushner does not flinch…gripping."
      Kirkus Reviews

      “Kushner is back with another stunner…without a shred of sentimentality, Kushner makes us see these characters as humans who are survivors, getting through life the only way they are able given their circumstances.”
      Library Journal
  • 7
    catalogue cover
    The Guarded Gate Bigotry, Eugenics and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America Daniel Okrent
    9781476798035 Hardcover HISTORY / United States Publication Date: May 07, 2019
    $43.00 CAD 152.4 x 228.6 x 35.56 mm | 496 pages Carton Quantity: 20 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      “An extraordinary book, I can’t recommend it highly enough.” –Whoopi Goldberg, The View

      By the widely celebrated New York Times bestselling author of Last Call—the powerful, definitive, and timely account of how the rise of eugenics helped America close the immigration door to “inferiors” in the 1920s.

      A forgotten, dark chapter of American history with implications for the current day, The Guarded Gate tells the story of the scientists who argued that certain nationalities were inherently inferior, providing the intellectual justification for the harshest immigration law in American history. Brandished by the upper class Bostonians and New Yorkers—many of them progressives—who led the anti-immigration movement, the eugenic arguments helped keep hundreds of thousands of Jews, Italians, and other unwanted groups out of the US for more than 40 years.

      Over five years in the writing, The Guarded Gate tells the complete story from its beginning in 1895, when Henry Cabot Lodge and other Boston Brahmins launched their anti-immigrant campaign. In 1921, Vice President Calvin Coolidge declared that “biological laws” had proven the inferiority of southern and eastern Europeans; the restrictive law was enacted three years later. In his characteristic style, both lively and authoritative, Okrent brings to life the rich cast of characters from this time, including Lodge’s closest friend, Theodore Roosevelt; Charles Darwin’s first cousin, Francis Galton, the idiosyncratic polymath who gave life to eugenics; the fabulously wealthy and profoundly bigoted Madison Grant, founder of the Bronx Zoo, and his best friend, H. Fairfield Osborn, director of the American Museum of Natural History; Margaret Sanger, who saw eugenics as a sensible adjunct to her birth control campaign; and Maxwell Perkins, the celebrated editor of Hemingway and Fitzgerald. A work of history relevant for today, The Guarded Gate is an important, insightful tale that painstakingly connects the American eugenicists to the rise of Nazism, and shows how their beliefs found fertile soil in the minds of citizens and leaders both here and abroad.
      Bio
      Daniel Okrent was the first public editor of The New York Times, editor-at-large of Time, Inc., and managing editor of Life magazine. He worked in book publishing as an editor at Knopf and Viking, and was editor-in-chief of general books at Harcourt Brace. He was also a featured commentator on two Ken Burns series, and his books include Last Call, The Guarded Gate, and Great Fortune, which was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in history. He lives in Manhattan and on Cape Cod with his wife, poet Rebecca Okrent.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “Deep and comprehensive…The Guarded Gate sharply reminds us that nativism has never been limited to its most savage enforcers like the Klan or neo-Nazis. It always has its ‘civilized’ voices, too, with lobbyists, funders, and advocates giving it respectable cover, domesticating it, putting it in Good Housekeeping rather than in Der Sturmer.” —The New York Review of Books

      '“The story of this triumph of ignorance has been told before, but never more vividly than by Daniel Okrent. . . A rigorously historical work.” —The Washington Post

      “[An] often surprising history. . . . The Guarded Gate is reminiscent of Okrent’s Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition (2010) in its elegant . . . prose and its focus on the unlikely alliances that converged to effect political change.” The Boston Globe

      “A frighteningly timely book about a particularly ugly period in American history, a bigotry-riddled chapter many thought was closed but that shows recent signs of reopening… One of the narrative's great strengths is the author's inclusion of dozens of minibiographies illuminating the backgrounds of the racist politicians and the promoters of phony eugenics ‘research’… [A] revelatory and necessary historical account.” —Kirkus Reviews

      “[A] sweeping history.” —The New Yorker

      “Engrossing… this fascinating study vividly illuminates the many injustices that the pseudoscience of eugenics inflicted on so many would-be Americans.” —Publishers Weekly

      “A sobering, valuable contribution to discussions about immigration.” —Booklist

      “A steely-eyed look at America’s eugenics movement.” —Library Journal

      “[A] detailed, compulsively readable account . . . a must-read for anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the history of immigration in the United States—and how the past might be relevant to policy makers and citizens today.” —BookPage
      “What’s so unsettling about Daniel Okrent’s spellbinding history of a previous immigration controversy is how it resonates with today’s debate. Insightful, unsparing, and totally absorbing, this book frames the discussion against a compelling historical backdrop that describes the gap between the American ideal and the American reality.” —Lawrence Wright, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Looming Tower and God Save Texas

      “In The Guarded Gate, Daniel Okrent has again taken a largely forgotten epoch in American history and brilliantly brought it back to life. Written with a grace that any novelist would envy, Okrent’s book tells the story of the immigration battles of the early twentieth century in a way that’s both fascinating on its own terms, but also, alas, all-too-relevant to today’s news.” —Jeffrey Toobin, CNN, author of American Heiress

      “Our two oceans have protected and insulated us, but they have also helped to incubate less attractive features. Daniel Okrent artfully and faithfully records our (earlier) dismal record on immigration and how those home-grown racist and xenophobic policies metastasized into exports with horrific worldwide consequences. This is a masterful, sobering, thoughtful, and necessary book.” —Ken Burns

      The Guarded Gate delivers a timely history of anti-immigrant fever centered in the elite eugenics movement a century ago. In this masterful narrative, sprinkled with wit, Daniel Okrent shows how the lesser angels of our heritage ‘depopulated Ellis Island as if by epidemic,’ leading to cycles of disgrace and reform.” —Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63

      “Daniel Okrent is a gifted social historian. In this powerful, fast-paced, and highly relevant chronicle of bad science and fearful prejudice, Okrent helps us understand how and why our country lost its way about a century ago. Read it so that history does not find new ways of repeating itself.” —Evan Thomas, author of The War Lovers
      “If you think we have reached peak stupidity — that America’s per capita quantity has never been higher — there is solace, of sorts, in Daniel Okrent’s guided tour through the immigration debate that was heading toward a nasty legislative conclusion a century ago.” —George F. Will, The Washington Post
      “Engrossing... It’s a grim and sordid story, but Okrent is a companionable, witty, and judicious guide.” —Commentary Magazine

      “A vivid new book…jam-packed with appalling examples” of anti-immigrant passions “primarily targeted at Catholics and Jews…” —The New York Times Book Review
  • 8
    catalogue cover
    Maternal Desire On Children, Love, and the Inner Life Daphne de Marneffe PhD
    9781501198274 Paperback FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Parenting Publication Date: May 14, 2019
    $25.00 CAD 139.7 x 212.72 x 17.78 mm | 336 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Esteemed psychologist Daphne de Marneffe examines women’s desire to care for children in an updated reissue of her “fascinating analysis that’s a welcome addition to the dialogues about motherhood” (Publishers Weekly).

      If a century ago it was women’s sexual desires that were unspeakable, today it is the female desire to mother that has become taboo. One hundred years of Freud and feminism have liberated women to acknowledge and explore their sexual selves, as well as their public and personal ambitions. What has remained inhibited is women’s thinking about motherhood.

      Maternal Desire is the first book to treat women’s desire to mother as a legitimate focus of intellectual inquiry and personal exploration. Shedding new light on old debates, Daphne de Marneffe provides an emotional road map for mothers who work and mothers who are at home. De Marneffe both explores the enjoyment and anxieties of motherhood and offers mothers in all situations valuable ways to think through their self-doubts and connect to their capacity for pleasure.

      Drawing on a rich tradition of writers, such as Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, Carol Gilligan, and Susan Faludi, as well as her experience as a psychologist and mother of three, de Marneffe illuminates how we express our desire to care for children. By treating maternal desire as a central feature of women’s identity—rather than as an inconvenient or slightly embarrassing detail—we can look with fresh insight at controversial issues, such as childcare, fertility, abortion, and the role of fathers. An “absorbing look at the enormous personal pleasure that women derive from mothering….Maternal Desire is a stirring book that celebrates women’s love for their children and mothering while also supporting their interest in careers and other pursuits” (Booklist).
      Bio
      Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together and Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life. In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. She is a contributing editor at Parents magazine, and her work has been featured in the New York TimesO, The Oprah Magazine; and on NPR and Talks at Google. Her research and scholarly work has been published in professional journals. She and her husband have three children and live in the San Francisco Bay Area.
      Marketing & Promotion
  • 9
    catalogue cover
    The Rough Patch Marriage and the Art of Living Together Daphne de Marneffe PhD
    9781501118937 Paperback FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Marriage & Long-Term Relationships Publication Date: May 14, 2019
    $25.00 CAD 139.7 x 212.72 x 22.86 mm | 384 pages Carton Quantity: 40 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      “Anyone grappling with the bewilderment of midlife…will be at once provoked and comforted by this enormously wise book” (Dani Shapiro, New York Times bestselling author of Hourglass: Time, Memory, Marriage), from a psychologist who has worked for decades with people struggling to preserve and enhance their marriages and long-term relationships.

      People today are trying to make their marriages work over longer lives than ever before. But staying married isn’t always easy. In the brilliant, transformative, and optimistic The Rough Patch, clinical psychologist Daphne de Marneffe explores the extraordinary pushes and pulls of midlife marriage, where our need to develop as individuals can crash headlong into the demands of our relationships.

      “A book of good intentions and helpful advice and a worthy manual for spouses” (Kirkus Reviews), The Rough Patch addresses common problems: money, alcohol and drugs, the stresses of parenthood, sex, extramarital affairs, lovesickness, health, aging, children leaving home, and dealing with elderly parents. Then, de Marneffe offers seasoned wisdom on these difficulties, explaining the psychological, emotional, and relational capacities we must cultivate to overcome them as individuals and as couples. Blending research, interviews, and clinical experience, de Marneffe dives deep into the workings of love and the structures of relationships.

      Intimate and always illuminating, The Rough Patch is an essential, compassionate resource for people trying to understand “where they are” on the continuum of marriage, giving them a chance to share in other people’s stories and struggles. “De Marneffe writes with poetry, wit, and compassion about the necessity of struggle in the quest for true love. Anyone in any relationship at any stage of life could stand to learn from the wisdom in these pages” (Andrew Solomon, National Book Award-winning author of Far from the Tree).
      Bio
      Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together and Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life. In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. She is a contributing editor at Parents magazine, and her work has been featured in the New York TimesO, The Oprah Magazine; and on NPR and Talks at Google. Her research and scholarly work has been published in professional journals. She and her husband have three children and live in the San Francisco Bay Area.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “In this beautifully reasoned, highly personal, and very generous book of advice and analysis, Daphne de Marneffe proposes that the rough patch that occurs in most midlife relationships should be cherished. For those who can endure it, it can generate a new reciprocity, deepening the very intimacies it threatened to break. De Marneffe writes with poetry, wit, and compassion about the necessity of struggle in the quest for true love. Anyone in any relationship at any stage of life could stand to learn from the wisdom in these pages.” —Andrew Solomon, National Book Award-winning author of Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity and The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression
      “Daphne de Marneffe’s The Rough Patch is remarkable for its combination of warmth and clarity. Anyone grappling with the bewilderment of midlife partnership – what Wendell Berry calls ‘the troubles of duration’—will be at once provoked and comforted by this enormously wise book.” —Dani Shapiro, author of Hourglass: Time, Memory, Marriage and Devotion: A Memoir
      “Through its title alone, The Rough Patch puts into words to what most of us experience every day: that long-term relationships are uneven, bumpy and difficult. With courage and compassion, de Marneffe challenges readers everywhere to take responsibility for the lives they want, to change the conversation they are having with themselves—and with their partners—from ‘This isn't the marriage I thought I'd have’ to ‘Am I the being the partner I thought I'd be?’ There isn't a couple in America who would not benefit from a copy--or two copies--of this book.” —Meg Jay, PhD, author of The Defining Decade and Supernormal
      “Like a magician, Daphne de Marneffe is able to deftly transport couples from one side of a seemingly insurmountable impasse to the other. Her wand is this magnificent book, The Rough Patch, and, in the hands of the reader, there is no trickery or sleight of hand, but rather the wisdom and tools to penetrate the fog and darkness of marital discord and make one's way into the clear light of a renewed connection” —Ian Kerner, PhD LMFT, New York Times bestselling author of She Comes First
      “Daphne de Marneffe, a terrific therapist based on the vivid anecdotes in this book, has written a wise and compassionate account of the rough patches that almost all midlife couples slide into, and how it's possible to get out of them. But this book is also a must read for younger couples who want to pay attention to the warning signs along the way, and for late-life couples who want to look back on their relationships with greater sympathy and understanding.” —Philip A. Cowan, Professor of Psychology Emeritus & Carolyn Pape Cowan, Adjunct Professor of Psychology, Emerita, University of California, Berkeley
      “This book is full of observations that may help troubled partners think differently about their relationship....A book of good intentions and helpful advice and a worthy manual for spouses.” Kirkus Reviews
      “Densely packed with de Marneffe’s extensive knowledge of human emotional development and the parent-child relationships that affect us from birth, [The Rough Patch] will be as useful to care providers and those who study family psychology as it will be to readers seeking a deeper—and ultimately hopeful—understanding of their own marriages.” Booklist
      “I’d like to take full credit for these personal improvements, but I confess: it was all The Rough Patch, Daphne de Marneffe’s insightful, provocative new book about marriage and midlife.” —Ada Calhoun, The Cut
  • 10
    catalogue cover
    The World's Fastest Man The Extraordinary Life of Cyclist Major Taylor, America's First Black Sports Hero Michael Kranish
    9781501192593 Hardcover HISTORY / African American Publication Date: May 07, 2019
    $39.99 CAD 152.4 x 228.6 x 27.94 mm | 384 pages Carton Quantity: 20 Canadian Rights: Y Scribner
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      In the tradition of The Boys in the Boat and Seabiscuit, a fascinating portrait of a groundbreaking but forgotten figure—the remarkable Major Taylor, the black man who broke racial barriers by becoming the world’s fastest and most famous bicyclist at the height of the Jim Crow era.

      In the 1890s, the nation’s promise of equality had failed spectacularly. While slavery had ended with the Civil War, the Jim Crow laws still separated blacks from whites, and the excesses of the Gilded Age created an elite upper class. Amidst this world arrived Major Taylor, a young black man who wanted to compete in the nation’s most popular and mostly white man’s sport, cycling. Birdie Munger, a white cyclist who once was the world’s fastest man, declared that he could help turn the young black athlete into a champion.

      Twelve years before boxer Jack Johnson and fifty years before baseball player Jackie Robinson, Taylor faced racism at nearly every turn—especially by whites who feared he would disprove their stereotypes of blacks. In The World’s Fastest Man, years in the writing, investigative journalist Michael Kranish reveals new information about Major Taylor based on a rare interview with his daughter and other never-before-uncovered details from Taylor’s life. Kranish shows how Taylor indeed became a world champion, traveled the world, was the toast of Paris, and was one of the most chronicled black men of his day.

      From a moment in time just before the arrival of the automobile when bicycles were king, the populace was booming with immigrants, and enormous societal changes were about to take place, The World’s Fastest Man shines a light on a dramatic moment in American history—the gateway to the twentieth century.
      Bio
      Michael Kranish is an investigative political reporter for The Washington Post. He is the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller Trump Revealed, John F. Kerry, The Real Romney, and the author of The World’s Fastest Man and Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War. He was the recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists Award for Washington Correspondence in 2016. Visit MichaelKranish.com.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “For anyone interested in cycling, technology or social history…a fascinating ride… Kranish has done historians and fans a service by reminding us that such immortals as Joe Louis, Jesse Owens, Serena Williams and Tiger Woods all followed in Major Taylor’s wake. In the lingo of bike racing, his ultimate legacy was as a pacesetter.”Washington Post

      The World’s Fastest Man… restores the memory of one of the first black athletes to overcome the drag of racism and achieve national renown.”The New York Times Book Review

      “A fantastic exploration of the life of an athlete who should be a household name, but isn’t.” — The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

      “Journalist Kranish weaves the fascinating and interconnected history of the rise and demise of professional cycling with the life story of African American cycling hero [Major Taylor]… Kranish mixes sports and history, along with the realities of racism, in a valuable addition for all libraries with collections touching on those areas.” Library Journal



      “[Major Taylor’s] legacy was in the quiet athletes, like Jackie Robinson, who endured endless abuse to break baseball’s color barrier. And… in athletes like Muhammad Ali, who refused to accept limits imposed by white men. It’s also in every child, black or white, boy or girl, who jumps on a bike, sprints down a track or plunges into a pool with one goal: To go faster.” —The New York Daily News
      “A must read.” —PELOTON Magazine
      “A welcome contribution to sports history, drawing attention to two extraordinary athletes for whom recognition is long overdue.” —Kirkus Reviews
      “Both inspiring and heartbreaking, this is an essential contribution to sports history.” —Booklist, starred review
      “A sharp-eyed account of a nearly forgotten African-American sports legend.” —Publishers Weekly
      “In this original, surprising, and important new book, Michael Kranish brings a man and an era back to vivid life. The story of Major Taylor—sportsman, bicyclist, pioneer—is in many ways the story of America. Through his speed and his grace, Taylor emerged as a critical figure that showed a world dominated by Jim Crow and abhorrent theories of innate racial disparities that the prevailing climate of opinion was as wrong as it could be.” —Jon Meacham, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author of The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels.
      “Michael Kranish has written an extraordinary book about an extraordinary figure whose place in American history could very easily have been lost to us all. But he does much more than illuminate the improbable story of a heroic black athlete. He throws open a window on a nearly forgotten version of America when a rising tide of hardship engulfed the lives of millions of black citizens, even as hope faintly glimmered. Major Taylor—a superstar at the zenith of his achievements—inspired both black and white Americans and became, too briefly, a last flicker of possibility for a 20th century in which ‘justice for all’ might still have become a reality. It is only through works like this that we can see just how much America lost when our society turned so completely down a path of total racial oppression in the 20th century. We also are reminded of the generations of black Americans whose talents and contributions to our national life were so cruelly suppressed. Major Taylor represents a very different America that could have been—a better one we sadly chose not to be.” —Douglas A. Blackmon, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author of Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black People in America from the Civil War to World War II
      “Jack Johnson, Jesse Owens, Jackie Robinson, Althea Gibson— the world recognizes the names of these trailblazers. Now, Michael Kranish shows that a new name should be added to the list. The World’s Fastest Man is a riveting account of the life of Major Taylor, the cyclist who was our country’s ‘First Black Sports Hero.’ Kranish brings Taylor’s story alive with vivid prose and extensive research. This is not just a story about Taylor, it is a story about his times; when racial prejudice blighted the lives of millions of Americans, and made their journeys through life far more difficult than they should have been.” —Annette Gordon-Reed, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author of The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family

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