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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Double Pregnant Two Lesbians Make a Family Natalie Meisner Canada
    9781552666012 Paperback FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Parenting On Sale Date: April 15, 2014
    $20.95 CAD 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 in | 192 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y Fernwood Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Girl meets girl. Girl marries girl. They want to have babies … but they need a little help. Double Pregnant is author Natalie Meisner’s light-hearted, poignant and informative true story of two lesbians who want to have children. For a variety of reasons, one being that Natalie’s wife is a woman of colour who was adopted into a white family, the couple decides not to take the anonymous sperm clinic route. Natalie and Viviën want their children to have some connection to their donor if possible. Taking matters into their own hands leads the couple to a series of often-hilarious “dates” with potential donors, all of whom have wildly different opinions on how the donation process should go and also of what this new, twenty-first-century version of a family will look like .

      “This book is so full of life and love, of effort and desire and the determination of two extraordinary women devoted to each other and to having a family.”
      — Chapelle Jaffe, Canadian actor

      “What an accomplishment, to have written a page turner on a subject like this that is both moving and very funny.”
      — Inge Fraters, Editor-in-Chief, KJIK Magazine & Know How Sonoma Publishing

      “A passionate and engaging account of a lesbian couple’s struggle to have a family. The book is not about sexuality or gender identity; it’s about love.”
      — Beth Everest, writer, professor and editor "
      Bio
      Natalie Meisner is a writer from Lockeport, Nova Scotia. She is a wife and mother of two great boys and an associate professor in the Department of English at Mount Royal University, where she teaches creative writing and drama.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Media:
        Front cover/feature in Swerve (Calgary Herald) May 9 - Mother’s Day
        May 9: CBC TV (Calgary); CBC Radio (Calgary)

        Readings:
        May 13, Owl’s Next Books, Calgary, AB
        May 15, People’s Co-op Bookstore, Vancouver, BC
        May 15-20, CCWWP Conference, Vancouver, BC

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Meisner’s book is, above all, a love story, and a close-to-the-bone account of one couple’s hopeful and ultimately rewarding journey to parenthood.

      "A touching and amusing love story about two women, two babies and one happy family."
      "...an honest recollection of the journey [Natalie and her wife] embarked upon while being pregnant at the same time." 

      Additional media:

      CBC Television (interview)
      CBC Radio (interview)
      Understorey Magazine (excerpt)
      Nova News Now (interview)
      Atlantic Books Today (excerpt)
      The Reflector (interview)
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Grist Linda Little Canada
    9781552665992 Paperback FICTION / Historical On Sale Date: April 01, 2014
    $20.95 CAD 9 x 6 x 2 in | 240 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      "This is the story of how you were loved,” Penelope MacLaughlin whispers to her granddaughter.

      Penelope MacLaughlin marries a miller and gradually discovers he is not as she imagined. Nonetheless she remains determined to make the best of life at the lonely mill up the Gunn Brook as she struggles to build a home around her husband’s eccentricities. His increasing absence leaves Penelope to run the mill herself, providing her with a living but also destroying the people she loves most. Penelope struggles with loss and isolation and suffers the gradual erosion of her sense of self. A series of betrayals leaves her with nothing but the mill and her determination to save her grandchildren from their disturbed father. While she can prepare her grandsons for independence, her granddaughter is too young and so receives the greater gift: the story that made them all. “

      "An epic story by a gifted writer. There are moments in Linda Little’s Grist that are breathtaking in both thought and lyricism.”
      — Donna Morrissey, author of The Deception of Livvy Higgs

      “Linda Little lays bare the hard joys, grit and heartache of women’s lives in the rural Maritimes before and during the Great War. Her writing is exquisite. Gripping, gorgeously imagined and positively haunting, Grist is a tour de force — a novel not just to like but to love. I couldn’t put it down.”
       — Carol Bruneau, author of Glass Voices and Purple for Sky "
      Bio
      Linda Little’s novels include Scotch River, which won the Raddall Atlantic Fiction Prize, and Strong Hollow, which was nominated for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award. She has published short stories in a variety of literary magazines and in The Penguin Book of Short Stories by Canadian Women. She lives in River John, Nova Scotia.
      Marketing & Promotion
        • Blog tour (10 stops) starting April 14, 2013
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “Grist is a fairly short novel at 232 pages, but it’s an historical novel that packs a lot of punch. I can honestly say that it will be one of my top favorites read this year. I cannot recommend it highly enough. Read this book!”
      "4 out of 5 stars"
      "Grist is a moving and melancholy read"
      “Elegantly written, with lovely descriptions of mill work and the transient joys Penelope finds in family life, Grist is a bleak and bittersweet ode to historical women’s strength and endurance.”
      “A wonderful historical novel that will be appreciated by fans of this genre.”
      “An enduring message of perseverance, courage and hope in the face of overwhelming heartache and oppression that haunts the reader long after the final page.”
      “I would absolutely recommend Grist to historical fiction readers!”
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    If This Is Freedom A Novel Gloria Ann Wesley Canada
    9781552665718 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Historical Publication Date: September 16, 2013
    $19.95 CAD Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      If This Is Freedom continues the story of struggle for Loyalist settlers in Nova Scotia after the American Revolutionary War. In the black settlement of Birchtown, times are especially hard for the former slaves. They face the difficulties of a hardscrabble existence and continued discrimination from their white counterparts. Like many desperate Birchtowners, Sarah Redmond has signed an indenture agreement, a work contract meant to protect her rights and ensure a living wage. Sarah’s employers, the Blyes, do not honour the agreement, and Sarah and her family are all but shattered when Sarah takes a wrong step — one she will come to regret as it sets off a chain of unusual events that put her under further pressure. With her faith in the settlement running dry and the Birchtowners abandoning the settlement, Sarah is perplexed and soon faces the taxing option of whether to hold on to the only real life she has ever known or let go. At once a stand-alone story and a companion to Gloria Ann Wesley’s previous novel, Chasing Freedom, this story about moral courage and the enduring strength of dreams shares history with us in a way that is both honest and emotional.
      Bio
      Gloria Ann Wesley is a writer and poet based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her works include Chasing Freedom, Burlap and Lace, Woman, Sing and To My Someday Child. Chasing Freedom was shortlisted for the Ann Connor Brimer Award for Children’s Literature.
      Marketing & Promotion
  • 4
    catalogue cover
    Rock Reject Jim Williams Canada
    9781552665169 Paperback FICTION / Political On Sale Date: August 15, 2012
    $19.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.5 in | 256 pages Canadian Rights: Y Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Though still a young man, Peter has experienced a life’s worth of heartache. Unable to face the reminders of his loss, he flees Toronto, exiling himself to a mountaintop mine in northern British Columbia. Into the stark, grey land of Stikine Peter arrives, broken and withdrawn. “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here,” reads the sign to Rock Reject, the dusty, noisy area of the mine where Peter shovels spilt rock and dust onto a conveyor belt. The year is 1974 and the Company is mining asbestos, which it claims poses no health risks to either mine workers or residents of the nearby native community. Try as he might to push aside his concern for others, Peter can’t help getting involved when the wellbeing of those around him is put on the line. Digging for the truth, Peter finds more than he bargained for in this compelling story of personal struggle and political change.
      Bio
      Originally from Vancouver, Jim Williams lives in Halifax, where he and his wife, Jane Finlay-Young, divide their time between their massage therapy practices and writing.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      In the mountains of British Columbia, about a hundred kilometres south of the Yukon border, a small green sign on the side of the road alerts travellers to a unique sight: an abandoned town named Cassiar. Empty houses lie broken in the wide valley and the low, grey-topped mountains are sparsely covered by small pines. Visitors who venture further down the road, past the last caved-in roof, can see the remains of a large industrial building, a twisted mass of metal girders standing guard over a large mound of crushed ore. This is all that remains of the Cassiar asbestos mine, where Jim Williams worked almost 30 years ago. Williams spent his days in the dusty, cramped quarters of the “rock reject” area, shovelling load after load of black rock onto a mill-bound conveyor belt, each stone slivered with tiny white fibres of chrysotile asbestos. “It really was as hellish a place as I have tried to depict [in Rock Reject],” says Williams, a first-time author who now lives in Halifax. “The workers were represented by the United Steelworkers of America, and I became a shop steward and also was the health and safety representative for the union.” Williams has taken those experiences and crafted a novel of substance that carries more weight than a didactic account of a workplace struggle. Rock Reject is lifted up on the shoulders of Peter Stevens, the novel’s complicated and flawed protagonist. Grieving the death of his wife, Peter drops out of medical school and flees Toronto. He ends up in the fictional town of Stikine, British Columbia, where he finds work as a labourer in the mine. Peter is withdrawn; his grief and guilt prevent him from developing friendships with his fellow workers. When the union president is killed in a workplace accident, Peter is forced out of his shell and becomes active in the union. He begins to press the company for protection from the asbestos dust, not only for the workers but also for the Aboriginal community that lives downwind from the mine. He encounters stiff resistance from both management and some of the workers, which only strengthens his resolve. This struggle brings Peter a sense of purpose, pulling him back into the world, where he is finally able to come to terms with the truth of his wife’s death. “The engagement with the outside world, acting on behalf of others,” says Williams, “allows Peter to confront his memories in their fullest, and to accept responsibility for his actions.” Rock Reject is the inaugural recipient of the Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature. The annual award provides the winner with $1,000 and a publication contract with Roseway Publishing. The Beacon Award was created by a small group of Maritime activists and writers who were inspired by the Bellwether Prize, a similar award founded by American author Barbara Kingsolver. Among the group were Errol Sharpe and Beverley Rach of Fernwood Publishing, who had recently acquired Roseway Press and wanted to establish the imprint as a publisher of social justice fiction. “The seed for the Beacon Award was planted, though the project is still unfolding,” says Anne Bishop, author of Becoming an Ally and member of the Beacon Social Justice Literary Society. “We are a small group of volunteers, and for the time being we accept submissions only from authors based in the three Maritime provinces. Of course, we would love to expand to something national someday.” With the release of Rock Reject, the Beacon Award committee has given Williams the chance to share the stories of the ghosts of Cassiar, tales of inner struggle and political solidarity that are tragic but ultimately hopeful. In so doing, they have succeeded in their aim of supporting fiction that can “ignite readers’ passion for and understanding of social justice.” – Briarpatch 2012 Hell on Earth: A Review of Jim Williams Rock Reject Asbestos was once referred to as the “miracle fibre.” It’s used as a binder in cement, as insulation and in anti-fire walls. It’s also a carcinogen with a legacy of death that stretches across the globe. It causes cancerous growths on the lungs as well as a number of other fatal diseases. Until recently, Canada was one of the world’s largest asbestos producers and exporters, behind only Russia. In Jim Williams’s debut novel Rock Reject, winner of the inaugural Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature, he describes the experiences of miners in northern British Columbia at a time when asbestos mining was a lucrative industry and safety took a back seat to profits. The novel’s protagonist is Peter, a medical school student from a privileged background. Unable to face the painful reminders of loss, he departs for self-exile on the mountaintop mine of Stikine after the tragic death of his young wife. The mud-splattered sign leading into town reads “Home of the World’s Finest Asbestos.” Stikine is loosely based on the Cassier mine, about 220 kilometres south of the Yukon boarder. It was there that Jim Williams spent some months during his early 20s working as a labourer. While the narrative treads some familiar ground and is, at times, too convenient (Peter’s father is a respected physician who specializes in lung diseases) its strengths are in describing the hellish working conditions at the mine. Stikine seems to exist in a bubble outside of time and space, a setting more akin to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road than a modern industrial workplace. The stark images are both revealing and, at times, shocking. Peter works in the aptly named “Rock Reject,” a desolate pit where he shovels split rock and heavy dust onto a conveyor belt. This is Williams’s writing at its most effective, evoking a palpable sense of claustrophobia and dread: “Bare bulbs hung from the ceiling, lighting the dust that floated in the cold air, so thick that the view beyond fifty feet was obscured in the haze. Peter felt the back of his throat tighten with each breath he took.” But Rock Reject is not without its faults. The novel turns maudlin in its reliance on the familiar theme of redemption through suffering. Rock Reject doesn’t quite inspire empathy for its protagonist, but it does leave the reader with a feeling of dismay that such an industry was, for decades, propped up by public funds. Recently, the federal and Quebec governments reneged on their promise to spend $50 million to assist in the reopening of two asbestos mines. Those local industries once provided 85 per cent of the world’s supply of asbestos. It’s clear the cause has been abandoned. It is voices like Williams’s protagonist, Peter, which helped hasten its demise. – Toronto Review of Books Working in an asbestos mine is definitely dangerous to your health. More than 100,000 people die each year from asbestos-caused diseases; mesothelioma, asbestosis, and lung cancer. It’s an insidious health risk because the latency period between exposure and diagnosis is 20 to 50 years, making it a silent killer difficult to track. Life in a northern British Columbia asbestos mining town would seem to provide an ideal locale for a novel aimed at exposing past injustices and promoting social change. Jim Williams’ novel Rock Reject fills the bill and does so in disburbing, haunting fashion. The novel transports us back to 1974. Grieving the loss of his wife to an unexpected hemorrhage, the central character, Peter Stevens, quits medical school and leaves Toronto for the Stikine region of northern B.C., determinded to “find himself” or “prove himself” in a virtual hellhole on the frontier. Spurning his doctor father’s wishes, he breaks away and hires on as a simple labourer in the “rock reject” section of the asbestos mine. “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here” is the inscription on the sign at the entrance to the noisy, dusty area of the mine where Peter shovels split rock and residue onto a conveyor belt all day long. Peter’s personal exile takes him to “the end of the goddam road” and it would be hard to imagine a more dangerous or gloomy workplace. The bookish “greenhorn” trades his London Fog overcoat for a hard hat and clunky steel-toed boots, and shivers when he hears that most new recruits last only three weeks before quitting the job and heading back south. Peter tries to “fit in’ with the hard-bitten miners and spends hours on end alone in his bunkhouse or gazing out over the mountain vistas. The crude language of the northern frontier is captured in the choppy banter between Peter and his co-workers. Swinging the lead, bogging-off, or sucking-up to the bosses are described in colourful, vividly descriptive ways. He finds acceptance by standing up for fellow workers as a “union man.” In an asbestos mine full of horrors, the shop steward was one of the few people that Peter could turn to for help or moral support. It’s a sterotypical miner’s world where the bosses are mean and brutish and the union provides much-needed solidarity. Escaping the endless shovelling operation, Peter becomes the union rep and begins to apply his acquired knowledge of health issues. He’s appalled by the safety risks and by the serious health dangers posed by thick asbestos dust for both the mine workers and natives living on a nearby reservation. The unlikely hero urges his fellow miners to rise up in an effort to extract improved health conditions. Miners living paycheque to paycheque are almost as difficult to win over as the hard-nosed mine operators. He sticks it out for a year, raising health alarm bells that were unknown at the time and concealed by the mining companies. Rock Reject purports to be a work of fiction. It is actually a thinly veiled version of the real-life experiences of asbestos miners in Cassiar, now a mining ghost town in the far reaches of northern British Columbia. Asbestos mining in the Cassiar Mountains experienced its heyday in the mid 1970s. The town swelled to 1,500 people, before closing in 1992 with the decline of the B.C. industry. The book passes the miners’ smell test for authenticity. “Although a work of fiction,” former miner Herb Daum says, “there is much truth in it.” He should know, since he worked in those mines from 1954 until 1983 and now maintains the ghost town’s intriguing website. Hundreds of former B.C. asbestos miners now live in fear of becoming victims of that deadly asbestos dust. It’s still a headline-grabbing story in British Comunbia as well as in Quebec where most of the mines were (and are) located here in Canada. Williams’ novel is a very timely book. It will stand as a good example of the potential of Canadian social justice literature to reach new audiences. Yet it is, first and foremost, more of a grim reminder of the shameful conduct of the asbestos mine owners and the continuing health risks facing the former workers. — Halifax Chronicle Herald There is no question that asbestos is dangerous. Jim Williams’ Rock Reject, which won the inaugural Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature, is dedicated to the 100,000 people who die each year from exposure to the substance. The novel provides a powerful glimpse of the risks that accrue for the people who mine it, while also telling a touching story of personal stuggle. The novel opens in 1974. Feeling responsible for the death of his wife, Peter Stevens drops out of med school and leaves Toronto for the Stikine region of Northern B.C., where he hires on as a labourer in the “rock reject” asbestos mine. There he hopes to escape his grief, his guilt, and his parents, but also perhaps to punish himself for past sins. Peter’s painful history unfolds for the reader as he adapts to mining life, preferring to remain withdrawn from his co-workers. Initially stationed in the mine, and later becoming union rep, Peter witnesses not only the safety risks of an underfunded mining operation but also the serious health effects the thick asbestos dust has on the mine’s employees and the natives living on a nearby reservation. Finding a purpose, Peter employs his medical background to counteract the detrimental impact of the mine. Williams, who has first-hand experience in asbestos mining, effectively blends fact and fiction, though his prose sometimes comes across as clunky: the pace dawdles and the dialogue is at times stilted and unconvincing. Nevertheless, the author’s sense of place and character is strong. Peter’s loneliness and grief are palpable, and his frustrating fight for social justice is particularly charged. Aside from the hasty and regrettably corny conclusion, the novel succeeds in telling a moving story of political change and human struggle. – Quill and Quire Rock Reject won the 2011 inaugural Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature, which is an honour for author Jim Williams, but could be something of a warning sign for readers simply seeking a good story well-told, rather than a literary lesson on the ills of the world. Luckily, the book, about a mine in Stikine, B.C. “Home of the World’s Best Asbestos,” in 1974, is motivated more by character than cause. The narrative is set in motion when Peter, a medical-school dropout, leaves Toronto burdened with guilt that he is responsible for the death of Rose, his young wife. He sees the mines as the “end of the goddamn road,” the perfect place for the self-flagellation he seeks. He trades his London Fog overcoat for a hard-hat and steel-toed boots, and a job so tough, most guys last three weeks before quitting and heading back south. It is masculine story, in character, setting, dialogue and style, the writing as tight and wiry as the hard men who mine. Despite the isolation he thinks he needs, Peter can’t help getting involved in the medical and political dimensions of the blatant asbestos exposure that is happening around him. And the reader can’t help getting involved in the story, which makes personal a headline-grabbing story that most readers will know, but, until this book, probably haven’t really felt. – Telegraph-Journal Picture it: 1970s Canada. Our protagonist, Peter, is a privileged man-boy from Toronto. His path is all laid out for him: med school, loving young wife, a starched-collar father. But like so many young white men, Peter has to destroy his whole world just to realize the gifts he was given. And destroy it he does. Author Jim Williams sends poor Peter through a series of tribulations, and at each turn Peter manages to muck up his own situation in such a failing fashion that the reader is almost faced with a protagonist with whom it’s impossible to empathize. And Peter isn’t just ruining his own life. Not by a long shot. When his self-created tragedy strikes, poor Peter runs as far and as fast from the scene as he can, and winds up in a Yukon asbestos mine. It’s a harrowing hell on Earth, an attempt at suicide of sorts and our hard-to-like protagonist buries himself in the rough comfort and sense-numbing exhaustion that comes with a singular commitment to back-breaking labour. One gets the sense that Peter works in order to destroy himself or, at the very least, to escape himself. Of course, no matter where you go, there you are deep in the Earth’s bowels, and Peter must inevitably come to terms with what he has done. A rag-tag world of hard-luck miners surround Peter, and despite his best efforts at the pariah-like isolation he feels he deserves, a world of dreamers and schemers begins to open up around him. Buoyed on by Williams’s cross-Canada cornucopia of characters, Peter rekindles his purpose, and finds a home in the labour struggles that surround him. The union becomes a surrogate parent, in which Peter finally finds a means by which to apply his education, his privilege. The asbestos the men are mining is slowly killing them; management is covering it all up; and up in Stikine, deep in the Yukon, Peter is the only one who can bring the damning proof to light. Williams give Peter a second chance at finding a moral compass, and despite my best efforts to give up on Peter as an un-salvageable piece of human detritus, I found myself begrudgingly rooting for his efforts when applied to the larger struggle. It’s a testament to Williams’s writing abilities that even a character as initially morally reprehensible as Peter can gain some measure of salvation. It’s also a testament to the potential value of unions in a worker’s life. Rock Reject (Roseway Publishing) is the 2011 winner of the Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature. — Halifax Media Coop
  • 5
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    Turn Us Again A Novel Charlotte R. Mendel Canada
    9781552665701 Book FICTION / Family Life Publication Date: September 15, 2013
    5.5 x 8.5 x 0.5 in | 336 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Winner of the Margaret and John Savage First Book Award, 2013 Atlantic Book Awards. Turn Us Again powerfully, painstakingly, and painfully explores a difficult theme, effectively shifting perspectives to show multiple sides of a shattered family history. Readers will find themselves pulled into the darker side of love, partnership and family, the part that usually comes after the movie ends. The writing here is well crafted, developing the complex, complete characters that drive the story heartward. It will stay with readers long after the last page is turned. — Chris Benjamin, author of Drive-by Saviours and Eco-Innovators Called to his dying father’s bedside, Gabriel Golden’s life is turned upside down after receiving his mother’s journal. The journal chronicles his mother’s life in post-war Britain, her genteel upbringing and her eventual marriage to Gabriel’s father, a complicated man raised in an aggressive, Jewish family who drinks to escape financial worries. Gabriel is shocked as the novel reveals dark secrets about his parents’ relationship, shaking Gabriel’s preconceptions about his father — and himself. Based on a true story and winner of the H.R. Percy Novel Prize and the Beacon Award for Social Justice, Turn Us Again is a powerful exploration of the dynamics within family relationships, enticing the reader to embark on a journey towards a more complex understanding of the issue of abuse.
      Bio

      Charlotte R. Mendel’s writing has appeared in City Lights, the Tel Aviv supplement of The Jerusalem Post, The Breastfeeding Diaries, The Nashwaak Review, The Healing Touch of Horses and several other anthologies. She currently lives in Enfield, Nova Scotia, with her family.

      Marketing & Promotion
  • 6
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    Rebel Without A Pause A Memoir Nick Ternette Canada
    9781552665725 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Social Activists Publication Date: November 01, 2013
    $19.95 CAD Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Rebel Without A Pause is the autobiography of Winnipeg’s best-known and most persistent political activist, Nick Ternette. For over forty years, Nick was one of the loudest voices of the Left, who ran for mayor multiple times and never shied away from asking elected officials tough questions. A champion of the rights of the poor and the disabled, sustainable ecology and public transit as well as a leader in Winnipeg’s peace movement, Nick was a thorn in the side of conservative politicians and city official for decades. Written before his death in March 2013, Rebel Without A Pause invites us into the personal life and political memories of one of Winnipeg’s most cherished citizens.
      Bio
      Nick Ternette was a professional radical, and was a political activist and community instigator in Winnipeg for over forty years.
      Marketing & Promotion
  • 7
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    The Lost Teachings / Panuijkatasikl Kina'masuti'l Michael James Isaac Canada, Dozay (Arlene) Christmas Canada
    9781552665343 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / People & Places Publication Date: May 15, 2013
    $14.95 CAD 10 x 8 x 0.25 in | 48 pages Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      One day as the great Eagle flew high above the forest he came upon a small bundle containing seven teachings, teachings that will bring balance harmony and peace to all who practice them. But the teachings come with a simple warning: beware of envy and greed. As Eagle spreads the seven teachings throughout the forest, he forgets to heed their warning and soon the forest is lost to jealousy, greed and selfishness. Eagle must save the forest, and he soon learns the most important teaching of all: truth. “When you see Eagle flying high in the beautiful sky above, ask yourself this: Am I proud of myself? Have I respected myself, others, and the environment? Have I stood up for someone and stood up for what is right? Have I practiced the teaching of truth?” This engaging story, with beautiful illustrations by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas, allows the reader to reconnect to and understand the seven teachings and their meaning in relation to themselves and society as a whole. The Lost Teachings is a story about the importance of the seven teachings — wisdom, respect, love, honesty, humility, courage and truth — and how interconnected they are in achieving balance, harmony and peace for individuals and society as a whole.
      Bio


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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      ”Once again, Michael James Isaac and Dozay Christmas have demonstrated that art and story telling are important means for promoting love of one’s own culture and appreciation across cultures. This beautifully illustrated and wonderfully told narrative is a valuable resource for helping children, and adults, grow in ways that claims and reclaims a balance among individual, community, and societal character building.” — Randall B. Lindsey, California State University
  • 8
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    Sagkeeng Legends — Sagkeeng Aadizookaanag Stories by John C. Courchene Craig Charbonneau Fontaine Canada, Lloyd Swampy Canada
    9781552665176 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Native American On Sale Date: September 01, 2012
    $14.95 CAD 8.5 x 6 x 0.13 in | 72 pages Canadian Rights: Y Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      John C. Courchene was born in Sagkeeng First Nation in 1914, where he attended the Fort Alexander Indian Residential School. Courchene’s time in the residential school was short; his brothers, "Joejay" and Louis, took John out school so he could help them cut wood in the bush. While this helped John make a lifetime commitment to hard work, it also resulted in John being “illiterate” in the European sense of the word. In the ways of the forest and his native language, Anishanabemowin, however, John was far from illiterate. Sagkeeng Legends is a testament to John’s cultural literacy and a monument in the face of eroding Indigenous language and culture caused by centuries of colonization. Originally recorded by John’s wife, Josephine Courchene, in the early 1980s and reprinted here in both English and Anishanabemowin by Craig Fontaine, the stories in Sagkeeng Legends represent two pebbles where a mountain of knowledge once stood. Nonetheless, this book is an important act of preserving and reintroducing Indigenous language and culture to a new generation.
      Bio
      CRAIG FONTAINE is a researcher with the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre in Winnipeg. His home community is the Sagkeeng First Nation, Treaty One, where his grandfather John C. Courchene was born and raised and originally told these stories.
      Marketing & Promotion
  • 9
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    Everything Is So Political A Collection of Short Fiction by Canadian Writers Sandra McIntyre Canada, Fred Stenson Canada
    9781552665497 Paperback FICTION / Anthologies Publication Date: May 15, 2013
    $19.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.5 in | 200 pages Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The stories within Everything Is So Political explore the intersection between politics and the contemporary short story. From the overt to the subtle, this collection tackles a broad range of topics and themes, from women’s rights and Aboriginal culture to environmentalism, terrorism and totalitarianism. This is one of the few Canadian anthologies that focuses on political fiction, and it does so in a very powerful and artful way, flying in the face of readers, writers and critics alike who claim that writing with a political agenda occurs at the expense of literary quality. Consisting of twenty short stories, this collection is proof that it is increasingly difficult, even impossible, for fiction not to be political. But make no mistake, the stories in this anthology are stories first: stories that are meant to be read, shared and enjoyed, but stories that will make you see things differently and question the world around you. “Sometimes the political seems so ugly that we would like to take the high road and avoid it. Yet everything is political for a reason. Freedom is never safe from greed, be it for money or power. Democracy exists only in the exercise. Therefore, the more we know, the more we must tussle and spin.” — From the foreword, by Fred Stenson
      Bio


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  • 10
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    9781552665152 Paperback FICTION / General Publication Date: March 15, 2013
    $19.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.75 in | 270 pages Roseway Publishing
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A corrupt mining company, repossessed gravestones, a man’s fractured past, mysterious notes posted to lampposts and murder deep in the highlands of Guatemala. In Tailings of Warren Peace, Stephen Law effortlessly weaves these elements into a powerful story of love and memory, exploring how the past haunts us and how solidarity can save us all. Mysterious, passionate and powerful, Tailings of Warren Peace shows us the interconnections that exist between us, transcending social class, culture and geography.
      Bio
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      " Stephen Law has taken a genre where few have recently shone and crafted a story that will have you shirking whatever you said you’d be doing. You’ll miss appointments for this book. The house will go dirty(er). The dogs will howl for dinner. It’s that good." — Miles Howe, Halifax Media Co-op

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Please enter your email address and click submit. An email with instructions on resetting your password will be sent to you.

Forgotten Password

An email has been sent out with instructions for resetting your password.