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Steerforth Press, Fall 2020

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    The Distance Ivan Vladislavic
    9781939810762 Paperback FICTION / Sports On Sale Date:September 15, 2020
    $27.00 CAD 5.73 x 7.03 x 0.88 in | 0.85 lb | 210 pages Carton Quantity:24 Archipelago
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A boxing bildungsroman - a collage of memories, love, resistance, and the spectacle of Muhammed Ali in Apartheid South Africa. 

      In the spring of 1970, a Pretoria schoolboy, Joe, becomes obsessed with Muhammad Ali. He begins collecting daily newspaper clippings about him, a passion that grows into an archive of scrapbooks. Forty years later, when Joe has become a writer, these scrapbooks become the foundation for a memoir of his childhood. When he calls upon his brother, Branko, for help uncovering their shared past, meaning comes into view in the spaces between then and now, growing up and growing old, speaking out and keeping silent.
      Bio
      Ivan Vladislavic is a novelist, essayist, and editor. He lives in Johannesburg where he is a Distinguished Professor in Creative Writing at the University of the Witwatersrand. His books include The FollyThe Restless SupermarketPortrait with Keys, and Double Negative. Among his recent publications are Flashback Hotel, a compendium of early stories, and The Loss Library. His work has won several prizes, including the University of Johannesburg Prize, the Sunday Times Fiction Prize, and the Alon Paton Award for non-fiction. In 2015, He was awarded Yale University’s Windham-Campbell Prize for Fiction.

      Author Residence: Johannesburg

      Author Hometown: Pretoria
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Targeted galley mailing to comparative literature professors, especially those with an interest in South African literature



        Author interviews available upon request



        Serial excerpt in major literary journals



        Review coverage in major outlets



        Advertising in Harper’s Magazine



        Bringing Vladislavic to the States in the Fall of 2020 the Brooklyn Book Festival and Yale University



        Radio Intervews



         
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      The Distance is a skillfully conducted chorus of language and voices… Vladislavić deftly alternates between the two narrators with a speed that, in the hands of a lesser linguist, could leave readers with verbal whiplash but, in this case, serves to highlight the fact that even shared memories can be vastly different…This contemplative coming-of-age story set in Apartheid-era South Africa is juxtaposed with the iconic Muhammad Ali fights.”  —Grace Rajendran, in Shelf Awareness

      “South African novelist Vladislavić delivers a moving, closely observed study in family dynamics in a time of apartheid…Vladislavić’s tale unfolds with grace and precision. A memorable, beautifully written story of love and loss.”Kirkus, Starred Review

      “This bittersweet story of hero worship and political awakening has a pole-axing sting in the tail. It focuses on two brothers, Joe and Branko, growing up white in Seventies South Africa…We cut between the two men in name-tagged segments that mingle recollections of adolescent longing with sharply observed scenes of their hesitant relationship as adults..In this instantly engaging novel, told in thoughtful but direct style, all the cleverness is under the bonnet.” — Daily Mail

      “Set in apartheid South Africa, this allegory of boxing, blood and brotherhood ripples with meanings and possibilities…In a country where language is profoundly, and knottily, connected to race and power, it is also a bulwark, and an escape…Full of grace and tenderness, The Distance is a searing tale of loss and learning as well as a beautiful evocation of brotherhood during a time of discord.” — New Welsh Review

      “Boxing is just one example of the kinds of opposing forces that Vladislavić explores with wit and sensitivity in this book: fact versus fiction, boyhood versus adulthood, masculinity versus machismo, apartheid versus freedom, and, most potently, brother versus brother.”—Mark Athitakis, On the Seawall

      “A beautifully, thoughtfully crafted novel…[The Distance] seeks to engage the reader—subtly, but in astonishingly many different ways, on questions about everything from race to how one can present narratives, from capturing a boxing match to attempts at autobiography to the films Branko’s son is experimenting with. Vladislavić again shows himself to be an exceptional writer—and this, as perhaps his most readily accessible work (though in fact it is many layers deep), is a good introduction to his work.” — The Complete Review

      “Violence meets quiet, action edges toward observation, and personality gives way to place. But where The Distance, like Portrait with Keys before it, asks that the reader build links across and between planes of memory, history, and city, the virtual world with which the book’s past collides is discomfitingly edgeless. Vladislavic is an auteur of this moment of collision. Always hovering just askew of the city he loves, his is a voice for making new spaces within it.” — Africa is a Country

      “One of South Africa’s most finely tuned observers.” - Ted Hodgkinson, Times Literary Supplement

      “The writing has a quality of unpredicitability, a wildness that seeps through the fabric of Vladislavic’s peerless linguistic control. Ivan Vladislavic is one of the most significant writers working in English today. Everyone should read him. ” - Katie Kitamura, BOMB

      “The Distance is a moving, sharply observed novel confronting questions of race, memory and forgetting, underlain by the necessity and difficulty of wrestling the past into story.” - Cameron Woodhead, Sydney Morning Herald
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Igifu Scholastique Mukasonga, Jordan Stump
    9781939810786 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories On Sale Date:September 15, 2020
    $24.00 CAD 5.33 x 6.74 x 0.36 in | 0.31 lb | 160 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Archipelago
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The stories in Igifu summon phantom memories of Rwanda and radiate with the fierce ache of a survivor. From the National Book Award finalist who Zadie Smith says, “rescues a million souls from the collective noun genocide.”

      Scholastique Mukasonga’s autobiographical stories rend a glorious Rwanda from the obliterating force of recent history, conjuring the noble cows of her home or the dew-swollen grass they graze on. In the title story, five-year-old Colomba tells of a merciless overlord, hunger or igifu, gnawing away at her belly. She searches for sap at the bud of a flower, scraps of sweet potato at the foot of her parent’s bed, or a few grains of sorghum in the floor sweepings. Igifu becomes a dizzying hole in her stomach, a plunging abyss into which she falls. In a desperate act of preservation, Colomba’s mother gathers enough sorghum to whip up a nourishing porridge, bringing Colomba back to life. This elixir courses through each story, a balm to soothe the pains of those so ferociously fighting for survival.

      Her writing eclipses the great gaps of time and memory; in one scene she is a child sitting squat with a jug of sweet, frothy milk and in another she is an exiled teacher, writing down lists of her dead. As in all her work, Scholastique sits up with them, her witty and beaming beloved.
      Bio
      Born in Rwanda in 1956, Scholastique Mukasonga experienced from childhood the violence and humiliation of the ethnic conflicts that shook her country. In 1960, her family was displaced to the polluted and under-developed Bugesera district of Rwanda. Mukasonga was later forced to flee to Burundi. She settled in France in 1992, only two years before the brutal genocide of the Tutsi swept through Rwanda. In the aftermath, Mukasonga learned that 37 of her family members had been massacred. Her first novel, Our Lady of the Nile, won the 2014 French Voices Award, was shortlisted for the 2016 International Dublin Literary award, and in 2019 was adapted into a film by Atiq Rahimi. In 2017, her memoir Cockroaches was a finalist for the LA Times Charles Isherwood Prize. In 2019, The Barefoot Woman was a finalist for the National Book Award for Translation. About the translator: Jordan Stump has received the 2001 French-American Foundation’s Translation Prize, and in 2006, was named Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. He has translated the work of Marie NDaiye, Eric Chevillard, Marie Redonnet, Patrick Modiano, Honoré de Balzac, and Jules Verne, among others. He is a professor of French literature at the University of Nebraska.

      Author Residence: Lower Normandy

      Author Hometown: Rwanda
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Author interviews available upon request.

        We hope to do an interview with an interview with either The Paris Review or BOMB.

        Serial excerpt in a major journal like The Paris Review, Granta, or The New Yorker (“The Glorious Cow,” in a different translation, has already appeared in The New Yorker and was featured in an interview with Deborah Triesman).

        Feature profile in major literary outlet.

        Review coverage in major outlets.

        Targeted galley mailings to comparative literature professors, especially those with an interest in Rwandan and African literature.



        Author Website: scholastiquemukasonga.net/en/

        Author Social Media: www.instagram.com/scholastiquemukaso/
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      National Book Award Finalist 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews
      Igifu depicts the lives of Rwanda’s Tutsis from their exile in the 1960s to the genocide of the ’90s…[Scholastique Mukasonga] mediates the personal through fable to convey the sense of a collective past…Mukasonga’s language, in Stump’s translation from the French, is at once intimate and impersonal…The devastation in Mukasonga’s stories is only amplified by the short story form.” — The New York Times

      “Haunted though they are by the memory of the unspeakable atrocities visited on her family and her people, these stories by Scholastique Mukasonga breathe upon a vanished world and bring it to life in all its sparkling multifariousness.” — JM Coetzee

      “Mukasonga carefully attends to how individuals’ attempts to negotiate unspeakable tragedy can lead to sad, odd, and even grimly funny situations…Igifu is full of deeply human moments. Taken as a whole, it’s an impressive and affecting work of art.” Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

      “Reminiscent at times of Iris Origo, Mukasonga writes with world-weary matter-of-factness, her stories understated testimonials to the worst of times. Elegant and elegiac stories that speak to loss, redemption, and endless sorrow.” Kirkus

      “Mukasonga has been writing autobiographical stories about her upbringing and Rwanda’s genocide for years, but “Igifu” may be her brightest, most eye-opening work yet.”— LA Times

      “Mukasonga’s autobiographical short stories about Rwanda plunge the depths of memory and grief, but also love and hope.”— Chicago Review of Books

      “Mukasonga’s superbly crafted stories leave the reader with a deep sense of desolation, thanks, in part, to her deft use of metaphor…Yet these stories are not devoid of joy and hope. The fortitude and perseverance of the Tutsi women; the bonds that unite neighbors, who put aside grudges and pull together in times of need; the beautiful milking rituals of the Tutsi farmers; the willingness of one woman to raise another’s child, should it be necessary — these particulars leave the reader with profound appreciation for the resilience and generosity of the Tutsi people. With Igifu, Scholastique Mukasonga has written a wonderful and important book, one that will expose most Western readers to unexpected new worlds.” — Washington Independent Review of Books

      “A collection of autobiographical stories set during the Rwandan genocide, Igifu will tear out your heart and piece it back together again. Dealing with themes of poverty, starvation, and death, the stories in Scholastique Mukasonga’s new collection will haunt you long after you’ve finished reading.” — Bustle

      “Mukasonga’s gift lies in illustrating the day-to-day reality of a persecuted minority, the calculations that must be made and the humiliations endured…The matter-of-fact psychological probity of Mukasonga’s work is akin to the piercing memoirs of Annie Ernaux and the early novels of Edna O’Brien. She also shares their gift for writing about childhood.” — Harper’s Magazine

      Igifu is a study in collective grief and trauma that finds its strengths through the observations of ritual…Scholastique Mukasonga is interested in the inability of the human mind to conceptualize genocide, overwhelming in its evilness and reach. As her characters find themselves unable to articulate what has transpired, her stories verbalize the horror of genocide in ways drastically abstract, beautifully and imaginatively rendered.” — Full Stop

      “Autobiographical elements continue to haunt [Scholastique Mukasonga’s] exquisite collection, Igifu, through five wrenching stories…Providing welcome continuity, French professor Jordan Stump translates the book, making Igifu the third of Mukasonga’s four English-language titles Stump has translated with graceful agility… Igifu seems to serve as a bridge among Mukasonga’s oeuvre, moving from memoirs (debuting in 2006 and 2008 in France) to this short fiction, to her first novel, Our Lady of the Nile…Despite the undeniable terror, Mukasonga’s storytelling proves illuminating and resilient.” —Terry Hong, Smithsonian BookDragon, in Shelf Awareness

      “These stories are intimate portraits of young people with no choice but to carry on. The heartbreaking realities of their plights are balanced by absorbing glimpses into Tutsi culture and the characters’ unquenchable senses of hope. Their resilience is inspiring, while their need to be resilient is a tragic reminder of the consequences of prejudice and unthinking hatred. Igifu is a poignant collection about the effects of trauma on tradition, community, and individuals.” — Eileen Gonzalez, Foreword Reviews

      “Combining the authority of traditional storytelling with the techniques of the social novel, [Scholastique Mukasonga’s] books explore themes of mourning and remembrance, female community, education and the insidious legacy of Rwanda’s Christianisation. At their centre lies the struggle of Rwandan Tutsis, who suffered decades of violence and displacement before the genocide of 1994.” — Julian Lucas, The White Review

      “I will read anything and everything by Scholastique Mukasonga, who writes in French and is translated by Jordan Stump. Mukasonga’s writing is beautiful, lucid, and moving about the most chaotic and devastating experiences. Her work astounds me in a way that few writers do. I return again and again to the haunting opening of The Barefoot Woman, her memoir about her mother, Stefania, who was murdered in the Rwandan genocide. The memoir itself is how the narrator keeps a broken childhood promise to her mother, ‘my sentences weave a shroud for your missing body.’ In September, I look forward to reading Igifu, a story collection published by Archipelago.” —Grace Talusan, author of The Body Papers, in Restless Books

      “[Igifu] contains nothing less than the heaviness of memory — its oceanic vastness, its vitality to the health and recovery of a community, its weight on the individuals charged with keeping it. Though each story has its narrators, characters, and families, I came away feeling that the main storyteller was both one and many — a we, a collective. In isolation, the stories are glittering gems; together in their own collective, they shed smoothness, and each edge is felt.” —Anna Weber, events manager, White Whale Bookstore, in BuzzFeed

      “From the first [story in Igifu], I was ushered to dazzling new outlooks on the world, some tinged with wit, some with terror…This is an author who goes well beyond recollection; she’s alert to the signals of other people’s nerve-endings.” —John Domini, Brooklyn Rail
  • 3
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    Fantastic Tales Iginio Ugo Tarchetti, Lawrence Venuti
    9781939810625 Paperback FICTION / Gothic On Sale Date:September 29, 2020
    $27.00 CAD 5.54 x 6.61 x 0.61 in | 0.52 lb | 260 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Archipelago
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Lawrence Venuti, winner of a Guggenheim fellowship and the Global Humanities Translation Prize, among many other awards, has translated into English these Italian Gothic tales of obsessive love, mysterious phobias, and the hellish curse of everlasting life.

      In this collection of nine eerie stories, Iginio Ugo Tarchetti switches effortlessly between the macabre and the breezily comical. Set in nineteenth-century Italy, his characters court spirits and blend in with the undead: passionate romances filled with jealousy and devotion are fueled by magic elixirs. Time becomes fluid as characters travel between centuries, chasing affairs that never quite prosper. First published by Mercury House in 1992.
      Bio
      Iginio Ugo Tarchetti was born in San Salvatore Monferrato in Piemonte, in 1839. After his military life was cut short due to illness (or for writing an antimilitarist novel, depending on who’s telling the story), he moved to Milan and became involved with the ’scapigliatura’, literally meaning ’dishevelled’, an artistic movement that rebelled against traditional values and the Italian artistic and literary canon at that time. He published articles in several newspapers. Considered the first Italian writer to experiment with the Gothic style, Tarchetti is often compared to Edgar Allan Poe. He died at the age of 29 from tuberculosis. About the Translator Lawrence Venuti is a translation theorist and historian. He translates from Italian, French, and Catalan. His translation projects have won awards and grants from the PEN American Center, the Italian government, the NEA, and the NEH. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for his translation of Giovanni Pascoli’s poetry and prose and his translation of Ernest Farrés’s Edward Hopper: Poems won the Robert Fagles Translation Prize. In 2018 his translation of J.V. Foix’s Daybook 1918: Early Fragments won the Global Humanities Translation Prize.

      Author Residence: Milan (deceased)

      Author Hometown: San Salvatore Monferrato in Piemonte
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Lawrence Venuti will be open to going to MLA and doing an event at Casa Italiana at Columbia, along with other university engagements. We will pitch to the Paris Review for serial, along with the New England Review, and to the Brooklyn Rail.
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “If Poe had set out to write Villiers de l’Isle Adam’s Cruel Tales, the result might be Tarchetti.  Beautifully translated by Lawrence Venuti, these capture Tarchetti’s unique and peculiar flavor: his deep Romanticism, his belief in the obsessiveness of desire, and his fascination with the supernatural.” —Brian Evenson, author of Dead Space: Martyr and Song for the Unraveling of the World

      “Tarchetti’s beguiling fantasies are triumphs of imagination as well as masterfully told stories. Tarchetti writes with comic bravura and surrealist invention that makes him a cousin, at least, of Kafka and Isak Dinesen.” - Guy Davenport

      “Tarchetti was pretty much the sole practitioner of the Gothic tale in his own language. Until his death in 1869 at the age of 29, he poured out a stream of freakish and fervid stories that made him moderately famous—and definitively minor. Does I. U. Tarchetti deserve better? Judging from Lawrence Venuti’s elegantly translated collection, ”Fantastic Tales,“ the answer is yes.” -James Marcus, The New York Times Book Review 

      “In Lawrence Venuti’s brilliant new translation of nine stories by cult Gothic storyteller Tarchetti, readers will find themselves confronted by the astounding, the uncanny, and the downright disturbing, immersed in the eerie and the macabre, and elbowed in the side by the comical.” — CrimeReads

      “Tarchetti occupies a singular place in Italian literature as an antecedent of the great innovators of this century, including Calvino and Pirandello…Tarchetti imported his stories from abroad, rewriting works by Mary Shelley, the Alsatian collaborators Emile Erckmann and Louis-Alexandre Chatrian, and Theophile Gautier. While the stories are marvelous in and of themselves, in Venuti’s thoughtful presentation they serve as entree into an equally strange and marvelous literary phenomenon.” -Publishers Weekly

      “Tarchetti, who also worked as a translator, was heavily influenced by gothic literature from abroad, favoring the morbid, the metaphysical, the socially and sexually outré…remarkably vivid and innovative …A collection of nine classic macabre tales, exquisitely translated from the Italian by Venuti.” Kirkus

      “While current Italian literature in English translation is closely followed by publishers, critics, and readers, the Italian writers of the past…are largely ignored. Lawrence Venuti now presents the nineteenth-century writer Iginio Ugo Tarchetti—a strange, romantic figure now almost forgotten even by Italian readers…Tarchetti is emblematic, the child of his times and their taste. These stories are enjoyable to read simply for themselves, but they also illustrate a literary culture of notable fascination. The translations flow, yet retain the flavor of their period and are true to the style and personality of their curious, gifted author.” —William Weaver


      “[Tarchetti] strived and succeeded in creating his own style which, on the one hand, anticipated elements of the great naturalistic novel by Zola and Verga while, on the other hand, pushed the boundaries of expressivity in an experimental direction.” —Enrica Maria Ferrara and Stiliana Milkova, Reading in Translation
  • 4
    catalogue cover
    Allegria Giuseppe Ungaretti, Geoffrey Brock
    9781939810649 Paperback POETRY / European On Sale Date:October 06, 2020
    $24.00 CAD 5.48 x 6.5 x 0.62 in | 0.52 lb | 204 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Archipelago
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Geoffrey Brock, whose translations have won him Poetry magazine’s John Frederick Nims Memorial Prize and a Guggenheim Fellowship, finally does justice to these slim, concentrated verses in his English translation, alongside Ungaretti’s Italian originals.

      Famed for his brevity, Giuseppe Ungaretti’s early poems swing nimbly from the coarse matter of tram wires, alleyways, quails in bushes, and hotel landladies to the mystic shiver of pure abstraction. These are the kinds of poems that, through their numinous clarity and shifting intimations, can make a poetry-lover of the most stone-faced non-believer. Ungaretti won multiple prizes for his poetry, including the 1970 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. He was a major proponent of the Hermetic style, which proposed a poetry in which the sounds of words were of equal import to their meanings. This auditory awareness echoes through Brock’s hair-raising translations, where a man holding vigil with his dead, open-mouthed comrade, says, “I have never felt / so fastened / to life.”
      Bio
      Giuseppe Ungaretti (1888-1970) was born in Alexandria to Italian settlers—his father was a laborer working on the Suez Canal and his mother ran a bakery. Ungaretti left for Paris to study at the Sorbonne, where he befriended Guillaume Apollinaire, Paul Valéry, Picasso, Braque, and Léger. Ungaretti wrote his first book of poetry while serving in the Italian Army in World War I. From 1936 until 1942, he taught Italian literature at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. After the death of his nine-year-old son, Ungaretti published a collection of poems, Il dalore, which expressed both tragic personal loss and horror at the atrocities of Nazi Germany. Ungaretti translated Shakespeare, William Blake, and Racine into Italian, among others. He died in Milan in 1970. About the translator: Geoffrey Brock was born in Atlanta and holds an MFA from the University of Florida and a PhD from UPenn. He has won multiple prizes for his original poetry, including the New Criterion Poetry Prize. For his translations, which include work by Cesare Pavese and Umberto Eco, Brock has won Poetry magazine’s John Frederick Nims Memorial Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the MLA’s Lois Roth Translation Award, and the PEN Center USA award for translation.

      Author Residence: Milan, Italy (deceased)

      Author Hometown: Alexandria, Morocco
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Geoffrey Brock will be very helpful in promoting this book in the Arkansas Creative Writing program, where he teaches and at Barnard, University of Chicago, Northwestern, and other colleges and universities. We hope to set up events at MLA and AWP. We will pitch first serial to Pleiades, The American Poetry Review, and Circumference.
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “…These poems burn like sparks of emotion, flashes of understanding, splinters of insight. However, despite their diaristic form, intensified by the horrors of war in the trenches, there is nothing fragmentary or unfinished about them; on the contrary, they aim to represent the totality of experience in the infinite and fathomless details of its unfolding…”  — Graziano Krätli, World Literature Today


      “If a poet’s first book represents a rebirth into language and the announcement of an arrival, then Allegria di naufragi introduces Ungaretti as a newly christened European and still spiritually loyal to the “bottomless” mystery of his and our origins.” —Ron Slate, On the Seawall
      “What a joy to have this new translation of Ungaretti, a great lyric poet so masterly translated by Geoffrey Brock. I will buy any book of poetry that Brock has translated. He is simply that good. But it is especially clear here, in the pages of Allegria, where the shortish lines test the translator’s ability to deliver nuance with light touch, precision, and almost Mozartian grace. The poems themselves praise the fleeting moment in the middle of crisis, praise the spark of tenderness in the time of misfortune, praise the breadcrumbs of rememberings in the hungriest of times, when no one remembers and everyone zigzags around the room, around the street, around one’s heart. This book will give you ’a momentary stay against confusion.’ It is a beautiful gift.” —Ilya Kaminsky, author of Deaf Republic and Dancing in Odessa

      “In their comparative abstraction, melancholy timbre and interest in the passing of time, Ungaretti’s early poems are in the tradition of Leopardi…his decisive novelty in Italian - the tiny lines, the absence of punctuation, the consequent focus on each individual word - owes more to the stimulus of Mallarmé and Apollinaire…His crystalline poems often emerged from a process of cutting; in his work…the placing of words has an almost pictorial suggestiveness.” -Matthew Reynolds, London Review of Books

      “The poems of L’Allegria do not just present, distilled and remade concrete in language, an impression, a moment, an insight. They do all this and they bear witness; they bear witness both to an objective, external reality, and to this reality as it is experienced, felt, lived…Geoffrey Brock’s new translation…is as faithful and rewarding as any English rendition of Ungaretti’s work could be.” — Nicola Vulpe, Manhattan Review

      “With his latest translation, Brock does justice to one of the masterpieces in Italian poetry, one which had a long-lasting influence on subsequent generations of poets…Brock then once again offers to the English-speaking readership a collection of poems which in their brevity and crystalline clarity resonate with our modern taste.” — Elena Borelli, Reading in Translation

      “Ungaretti’s poetry, born in the ordeal of World War I and its trenches…marked a turning point in modern Italian literature.” -Glauco Cambon

      “Ungaretti purged the language of all that was but ornament, of all that was too approximate for the precise tension of his line. Through force of tone and sentiment, and a syntax stripped to its essential sinews, he compelled words to their primal power.” -Allen Mandelbaum

      “One of the most authentic poets of Western Europe.” -T. S. Eliot
  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Salt Water Josep Pla, Peter Bush
    9781939810724 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / European On Sale Date:December 01, 2020
    $27.00 CAD 5.99 x 7.47 x 1.32 in | 1.4 lb | 310 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Archipelago
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Peter Bush, winner of the Ramon Llull Prize for Literary Translation, brings to English this most prolific and influential of Catalan writers.

      Dripping with a panache that can turn in a comic instant to the most conciliatory humility, Josep Pla’s foray into the land and sea most familiar to him will plunge readers head-first into its mysterious (and often tasty!) depths. Here are adventures and shipwrecks, raspy storytellers and the fishy meals that sustain them. After describing the process of beating an octopus with branches to soften up its flesh, Pla writes, “These are dishes that must be seen as a last resort.” Pla inflects the mundane with the hidden rhythms of power sculpting culture, so that a hot supper is never just food—it embodies economic precarity and environmental erosion along with its own peculiar flavor. A lifetime of reporting on current events gave Pla the necessary skills to describe the world in all its gritty, funny, invigorating detail.
      Bio
      Josep Pla (1897-1981) was born in Palafrugell on the Costa Brava. After abandoning law for journalism, Pla moved to Paris to serve as the correspondent for the Spanish newspaper La Publicidad. Pla went on to cover current events from Russia, Rome, and London, as well as Berlin, where he reported on Mussolini’s march on Rome and the collapse of the German economy. He returned to Madrid in 1927. Under the Franco regime, Pla was internally exiled to Palafrugell and his articles for the weekly review Destino were frequently censored.
      About the Translator:
      Peter Bush is an award-winning translator who lives in Oxford. Among his recent translations are Josep Pla’s The Gray Notebook, which won the 2014 Ramon Llull Prize for Literary Translation, and Ramón del Valle-Inclán’s Tyrant Banderas; Emili Teixidor’s Black Bread, Jorge Carrión’s Bookshops, and Prudenci Beltrana’s Josafat.


      Author Residence: Spain (deceased)

      Author Hometown: Palafrugell, Spain (deceased)
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: We will pitch first serial to publications like the Harvard Review and the Chicago Review. We will bring Peter Bush over for a two city tour.
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “He travels with smugglers, narrates the stories of storms and shipwrecks that he hears on boats and in cafés and listens to fishermen, bar-tenders, sailors, layabouts, cooks, crooks and eccentrics. You could call most of them eccentric, author included…The translation reads immaculately…With pride, Josep Pla talks in Salt Water of his fierce coast in his and its battered language. He both observes and shares the dreams, traditions, food and culture of its people.” —Michael Eaude, Catalonia Today


      “Pla’s stories are generally unadorned and precise in their renderings of both the people and the places of the far northeast of Spain, lives full of hardship and labor—but also their insistence on freedom. A fine introduction to a writer little known outside his native land and who memorably captures its atmosphere.” Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

      “The grand old man of Catalan letters and one of Spain’s most prolific writers.”—Chicago Tribune


      “In each essay, the reader is swept up and carried along…Pla’s style, ably translated here by Peter Bush, is glorious and precise.” —Lamorna Ash, Times Literary Supplement

      Salt Water benefits from Pla’s  prolific career collecting pithy observations from sources, which helped the author generate idiosyncratic characters and iconoclastic literary insights…His unique prose, suffused with love, exists in a space between stoic observation and daydream.” Colton Alstatt, Zyzzyva

      “Josep Pla has long been considered one of the finest writers of autobiographical texts in any of the languages of Spain.”—Hispanic Review

      “Considered one of the most influential Catalan authors of the twentieth century, [Pla] was born and raised in the Emporda, and over the course of his life wrote over 30,000 pages of prose in which he diligently catalogued the landscape and the life and habits of the people of the region. His complete works, published and republished over the years, contain marvelous descriptive passages that capture the landscape’s history and its complex topography at once.”—Words Without Borders

      “Josep Pla was a great noticer of things and places; his gaze was alert and dry; he wrote in a style which registered both the smallest detail and the large picture. His relationship to Catalan identity and Spanish history was complex, often ambiguous. His relationship, however, to the scene in front of him, or the days in which he lived, remains fascinating for its clarity, its sharpness, its originality and its wit. On display in his work is a glittering and sparkling sensibility.” —Colm Tóibín
  • 6
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    In the Land of the Cyclops Karl Ove Knausgaard, Martin Aitken
    9781939810748 Hardcover LITERARY CRITICISM / European On Sale Date:January 05, 2021
    $37.00 CAD 6.84 x 8.08 x 1.33 in | 2.23 lb | 350 pages Carton Quantity:12 Archipelago
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      From New York Times bestselling author Karl Ove Knausgaard comes a collection of ambitious, remarkably erudite essays on art, literature, culture, and philosophy.

      In the Land of the Cyclops is a collection of eighteen essays by Karl Ove Knausgaard on an array of visual artists and writers, and his own private life and thoughts. Paired with full-color images, Knausgaard discusses the work of artists such as Francesca Woodman, Cindy Sherman, Anselm Kiefer, and Sally Mann, to name a few. Writing on personal experiences that range from his encounters with the Northern Lights, the birth of his daughter, trips to the beach with his four children, to his career-spanning relationship with his editor, these essays beautifully capture Knausgaard’s ability to mediate between the deeply personal and the philosophical, with his trademark searing honesty and his deep longing to authentically see, understand, and experience the world.
      Bio
      Author Bio: Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in Norway in 1968. His debut novel Out of the World won the Norwegian Critics Prize in 2004 and his A Time for Everything was a finalist for the Nordic Council Prize. My Struggle: Book One was a New Yorker Book of the Year and Book Two was listed among the Wall Street Journal’s 2013 Books of the Year. My Struggle is a New York Times Best Seller and has been translated into more than twenty languages. Knausgaard writes regularly for the New York Times Magazine. Translator Bio: Martin Aitken is the acclaimed translator of numerous novels from Danish and Norwegian, including works by Karl Ove Knausgaard, Peter Hoeg, Jussie Adler-Olsen, and Pia Juul. His translations of short stories and poetry have appeared in many literary journals and magazines. In 2012 he was awarded the American-Scandinavian Foundation’s Nadia Christensen Translation Prize. In 2019 he was awarded the PEN Translation Prize for his translation of Love by Hane Orstavik, which was also a finalist for the National Book Award in 2018.

      Author Residence: Blackheath, South London and Sweden

      Author Hometown: Oslo, Norway
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Targeted galley mailing to comparative literature professors, especially those in an interest in Nordic literature

        Author interviews available upon request

        Serial excerpt in major literary journals

        Review coverage in major outlets

        Advertising in Harper’s Magazine

        Bring Knausgaard to New York City for an event

        Radio interview: National Public Radio, Fresh Air, All Things Considered

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      ". . . A modern Roland Barthes . . . Knausgaard has a gift for stopping the reader in their tracks with an unexpected, casual profundity." — Meghan O'Gieblyn, The New York Times Book Review

      "...As in the fiction, [Knausgaard's] intense focus, formidable command of reference and tendency to see the interconnectedness of things make for highly stimulating, almost overwhelming reading . . . The pantomime of critical dispassion is avoided; the rhetorical effect is one of wisdom gained rather than merely delivered." —Charles Arrowsmith, the Washington Post

      "Knausgaard is less interested in answers than in authentic engagement with the world . . . In the Land of the Cyclops is another worthy addition to Knausgaard’s oeuvre that aims to recapture this intense feeling and to see the world anew." —Phillip Garland, World Literature Today

      "I appreciate Knausgaard revealing his unflattering first impression, then interrogating it, his willingness to go further, to look again, and to show how his mind moves, then changes . . . I want to see what Knausgaard sees, even when I’m overwhelmed by it or disagree . . . Boring down into any moment, thought, or artwork, offers its own thrilling spectacle. You don’t want to look away." — Bridget Quinn, Hyperallergic

      "The collection, which also includes essays on Michel Houellebecq, Cindy Sherman and Kierkegaard, reads less like a book of criticism at times than a work of negative theology, circling the mysteries of artistic creation that cannot be directly articulated: What makes a book or a painting feel alive and relevant? Why should art, which occupies the realm of pure fantasy, have any rules at all?" — Stephen Poole, The Telegraph

      "Knausgaard’s passion for interiority and the detail of the individual experience, the most brilliant elements of his fiction, come through . . . “In the Land of the Cyclops” proves that Knausgaard’s struggle is still ongoing, the search for truth as a balance between reality and our experience of it: “This, which we perhaps could call inexhaustible precision, is the goal of all art, and its essential legitimacy.”" Jessica Ferri, The Los Angeles Times

      "Knausgaard argues that art is at its most effective when it destabilizes our understanding of the world...The moody, provocative black-and-white photos of Francesca Woodman reveal the “constraints of our culture and what they do to our identity” while Michel Houellebecq’s novel Submission succeeds because it suggests how easily disillusioned people might accept political upheaval, asking “What does it mean to be a human being without faith?”...The throughline is the author’s keen, almost anxious urge to understand the artistic mind." — Kirkus Reviews

      "In this . . . thought-provoking essay collection, Knausgaard once again displays his knack for raising profound questions about art and what it means to be human . . . These wending musings will be catnip for Knausgaard’s fans. " -- Publishers Weekly

      "Karl Ove Knausgaard explores the realm of the aesthetic where it overlaps with the quotidian in fact as he has in fiction . . . Much insight awaits any sifting through these disparate compositions . . . Knausgaard transforms the everyday into a portal of deep insight." -- John L. Murphy, Spectrum Culture

      More Praise for Knausgaard's work:
      • Intense and vital...Knausgaard is utterly honest, unafraid to voice universal anxieties...Superb, lingering, celestial passages...[with] what Walter Benjamin called the "epic side of truth, wisdom."-James Wood, The New Yorker
      • As Jeffrey Eugenides so marvelingly put it, [Knausgaard] broke the sound barrier of the autobiographical novel...There's something primitive and hungry in that experience-and for me, sometimes, something spiritual, close to the exprience of grace. - Charles Finch, Slate
      • What's notable is Karl Ove's ability, rare these days, to be fully present in and mindful of his own existence...as if the writing and the living are happening simultaneously...it immerses you totally. You live his life with him. - Zadie Smith, New York Review of Books
      • ...so aesthetically forceful as to be revolutionary - Jesse Barron, The Paris Review
      My Struggle is a revolutionary novel that is highly approachable, even thrilling to read. The book feels like a masterpiece-one of those genuinely surprising works that alters the tradition it inherited. - Meghan O'Rourke, Bookforum
      • The book kept me up until two almost every morning for a week...Real and singleminded in his storytelling." - Lorin Stein, The Paris Review
      • Questions about precisely what fiction is and how it relates to reality and the extend to which traditional narrative can be a delivery vehicle for saying something true about life...lie at the intellectual and aesthetic heart of Knausgaard's huge undertaking. - Daniel Mendelsohn, The New York Times
      • Knausgaard succeeds in producing prose that is "alive"...Such transgressive blurring of the borders between the public and private, sayable and unsayable, can be both life-affirming and riveting. - The Economist
      • For all its complexity, My Struggle achieves something pretty simple,the thing that enduring fiction has always done: it creates a world that absorbs you utterly...[Book Six] is alive. - Theo Tait, Sunday Times
      • Who'd have thought that the first monumental literary production of the 21st century...would seem, on a line-by-line basis, so modest and so raw? The books in the My Struggle series fly high by flying low, by scanning the intricate topography of everyday life. - Dwight Garner, The New York Times
      • This deserves to be called perhaps the most significant literary enterprise of our times. - Rachel Cusk, The Guardian
      • How wonderful to read an experimental novel that fires every nerve ending while summoning in the reader the sheer sense of how amazing it is to be alive, on this planet and no other. - Jeffrey Eugenides, The New York Times Book Review
  • 7
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    Lives and Deaths Essential Stories Leo Tolstoy, Boris Dralyuk
    9781782275411 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories On Sale Date:October 27, 2020
    $24.00 CAD 4.77 x 6.49 x 0.68 in | 0.45 lb | 224 pages Carton Quantity:24 Pushkin Collection
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Fresh translations of Tolstoy’s four richest shorter works by the award-winning Boris Dralyuk

      Tolstoy’s stories contain many of the most acutely observed moments in his monumental body of work. This new selection of his shorter works, sensitively translated by the award-winning Boris Dralyuk, showcases the peerless economy with which Tolstoy could render the passions and conflicts of a life.

      These are works that take us from a self-interested judge’s agonising deathbed to the bristling social world of horses in a stable yard, from the joyful vanity of youth to the painful doubts of sickness and old age. With unwavering precision, Tolstoy’s eye brings clarity and richness to the simplest materials.
      Bio
      Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) was born to an aristocratic family near Tula, Russia. After abandoning his studies he returned to live on his family’s estate, later enlisting in the army and serving in the Crimean War. Over the course of his life, he wrote plays, dozens of short stories and many works of philosophy. He is now one of the most widely admired writers of all time.

      Author Residence: Astapovo, Russia (deceased)

      Author Hometown: Yasnaya Polyana, Russia
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Widespread US publicity outreach including dedicated US mailing

        DRC to be made available via NetGalley and Edelweiss

        Additional social media publicity TBC
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
         • “Gratifying and timely.”—Times Literary Supplement
         • “When literature has a Tolstoy, it is easy and gratifying to be a writer. Even if you are aware that you have never accomplished anything, you don’t feel so bad, because Tolstoy accomplishes enough for everyone”—Anton Chekhov
         • “The greatest of all novelists”—Virginia Woolf
  • 8
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    An Evening with Claire Gaito Gazdanov, Bryan Karetnyk
    9781782276050 Paperback FICTION / Literary On Sale Date:October 19, 2021
    $24.00 CAD 4.69 x 6.5 in | 0.81 lb | 256 pages Carton Quantity:24 Pushkin Collection
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The lyrical first novel of youth and love by acclaimed modernist master Gaito Gazdanov, author of The Spectre of Alexander Wolf

      Two old friends meet nightly in Paris, trading conversational barbs and manoeuvring around submerged feelings. Throughout the ten years of their separation, thoughts of Claire lingered persistently in Kolya’s mind. As the imagined romance finally becomes real, Kolya is thrown into recollections of formative moments from his youth in Russia, from his solitary early years through military school and service in the White Army in the Civil War, all leading to this union with Claire.

      The first novel by the celebrated Russian master Gaito Gazdanov, An Evening with Claire is a lyrical, finely crafted portrait of a lost innocence and a vanished era.


      Story Locale: Paris
      Bio
      Gaito Gazdanov (1903-1971) joined the White Army aged just sixteen and fought in the Russian Civil War. Exiled in Paris from the 1920s onwards, he eventually became a nocturnal taxi-driver and quickly gained prominence on the literary scene as a novelist, essayist, critic and short-story writer, and was greatly admired by Maxim Gorky, among others. The Spectre of Alexander Wolf was published by Pushkin Press to great acclaim in 2013.

      Author Residence: Paris, France (deceased)

      Author Hometown: Saint Petersburg, Russia
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Widespread US publicity outreach including dedicated US mailing.

        DRC to be made available via NetGalley and Edelweiss.

        Additional social media publicity TBC.

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
         • “The Gazdanov revival…is nothing short of a literary event”—TLS
         • “Pushkin Press is to be congratulated on reviving an author who is as relevant now as ever”—Spectator
         • “A fascinating writer”—Irish Times
         • “Gazdanov’s work is the perfect fusion of the Russian tradition and French innovation”—London Review of Books
  • 9
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    The Coral Merchant Essential Stories Joseph Roth, Ruth Martin
    9781782275978 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories On Sale Date:November 10, 2020
    $24.00 CAD 4.75 x 6.48 x 0.71 in | 0.45 lb | 256 pages Carton Quantity:24 Pushkin Collection
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      New translations of the six greatest short stories by Joseph Roth, collected in a beautiful edition

      Joseph Roth’s sensibility—both clear-eyed and nostalgic, harshly realistic and tenderly humane—produced some of the most distinctive fiction of the twentieth century. This collection of his most essential stories, in exquisite new translations by Ruth Martin, showcases the astonishing range and power of his short stories and novellas.

      In prose of aching beauty and precision, Roth shows us isolated souls pursuing lost ideals and impossible desires. Forced to remove a bust of the fallen Austrian emperor from his house, an eccentric old count holds a funeral for it and intends to be buried in the same plot himself; a humble coral merchant, dissatisfied with his life and longing for the sea, chooses to adulterate his wares with false coral, with catastrophic results; young Fini, just entering the haze of early sexuality, falls into an unsatisfying relationship with an older musician. With the greatest craft and sensitivity, Roth unfolds the many fragilities of the human heart.
      Bio
      Joseph Roth was born into a Jewish family in the small town of Brody in the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. He studied first in Lemberg and then in Vienna, and served in the Austrian army during World War I. He went on to work as a journalist, travelling widely, staying in hotels and living out of suitcases, while also being a prolific writer of fiction, including the novels Job (1930) and The Radetzky March (1932). Roth left Germany when Hitler came to power in 1933 and settled in Paris, where he died in 1939.

      Author Residence: Paris, France (deceased)

      Author Hometown: Brody, Poland
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Widespread US publicity outreach including dedicated US mailing

        DRC to be made available via NetGalley and Edelweiss

        Additional social media publicity TBC
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      ‘One of the greatest writers of the first half of the tormented 20th century’ — Simon Schama, Financial Times 

      ’Roth is Austria’s Chekhov’—William Boyd

      ’Joseph Roth is counted among the great novelists of the twentieth century’TLS

      ‘What Roth sees and hands on is a unique essence, conveying the fragility of what is truly human in us, the ridiculous and the tragic’ — Nadine Gordimer
  • 10
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    The Mystery of Henri Pick David Foenkinos, Sam Taylor
    9781782275824 Paperback FICTION / Mystery & Detective On Sale Date:September 01, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.14 x 7.77 x 0.75 in | 0.52 lb | 288 pages Carton Quantity:24 Pushkin Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The delightful first title in a new collaboration with Channel 4’s Walter Presents: a fast-paced comic mystery enriched by a deep love of books

      In the small town of Crozon in Brittany, a library houses manuscripts that were rejected for publication: the faded dreams of aspiring writers. Visiting while on holiday, young editor Delphine Despero is thrilled to discover a novel so powerful that she feels compelled to bring it back to Paris to publish it.

      The book is a sensation, prompting fevered interest in the identity of its author - apparently one Henri Pick, a now-deceased pizza chef from Crozon. Sceptics cry that the whole thing is a hoax: how could this man have written such a masterpiece? An obstinate journalist, Jean-Michel Rouche, heads to Brittany to investigate.

      By turns farcical and moving, The Mystery of Henri Pick is a fast-paced comic mystery enriched by a deep love of books - and of the authors who write them.
      Bio
      Novelist, screenwriter and musician David Foenkinos was born in 1974. He is the author of fourteen novels that have been translated into forty languages. Several of his works have been adapted for film, including Delicacy (2011). The Mystery of Henri Pick is the first title in a new collaboration with Channel 4’s Walter Presents.

      Author Residence: Paris, France

      Author Hometown: Paris, France
      Marketing & Promotion
        Publicity: Widespread US publicity outreach including dedicated US mailing

        DRC to be made available via NetGalley and Edelweiss

        Additional social media publicity TBC
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “A delight with a novel premise.” — CrimeReads

      The Mystery of Henri Pick is so ridiculously French that if it started smoking Gitanes while you read it, you wouldn’t be entirely surprised.” — The Sunday Times Culture magazine

      “This book is light, funny and erudite: a delight.” — The Guardian

      “A charming literary caper…A playfully droll satire of the French publishing scene and a completely delightful jeu d’esprit.” — The Daily Mail

      “Written with humour, wit and intelligence, it’s set in a world of books and publishing. I really enjoyed it.” — TripFiction

      The Mystery of Henri Pick manages the great gap between levity and profundity, between humour and seriousness. A beautiful farce.” — Le Figaro Littéraire

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