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Arsenal Pulp Press Fall 2020

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Love after the End An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction Joshua Whitehead Canada
    9781551528113 Paperback FICTION / Anthologies Publication Date:September 01, 2020
    $21.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.7 in | 325 gr | 192 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Lambda Literary Award winner

      A bold and breathtaking anthology of queer Indigenous speculative fiction, edited by the author of Jonny Appleseed.

      This exciting and groundbreaking fiction collection showcases a number of new and emerging 2SQ (Two-Spirit and queer) Indigenous writers from across Turtle Island. These visionary authors show how queer Indigenous communities can bloom and thrive through utopian narratives that detail the vivacity and strength of 2SQness throughout its plight in the maw of settler colonialism's histories.

      Here, readers will discover bioengineered AI rats, transplanted trees in space, the rise of a 2SQ resistance camp, a primer on how to survive Indigiqueerly, virtual reality applications, mother ships at sea, and the very bending of space-time continuums queered through NDN time. Love after the End demonstrates the imaginatively queer Two-Spirit futurisms we have all been dreaming of since 1492.

      Contributors include Nathan Adler, Darcie Little Badger, Gabriel Castilloux Calderon, Adam Garnet Jones, Mari Kurisato, Kai Minosh Pyle, David Alexander Robertson, jaye simpson, and Nazbah Tom.

      Bio

      Joshua Whitehead is an Oji-Cree/nehiyaw, Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer member of Peguis First Nation (Treaty 1). He is the author of the novel Jonny Appleseed (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2018), longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and the poetry collection full-metal indigiqueer (Talonbooks, 2017) and the winner of the Governor General's History Award for the Indigenous Arts and Stories Challenge in 2016. He is also the editor of Love after the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2020). Currently he is working on a PhD in Indigenous Literatures and Cultures in the University of Calgary's English department (Treaty 7).

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Lambda Literary Award 2021, Winner
      Reviews

      Many of the stories offer portraits of a dead Earth from which new life springs, and all are ultimately uplifting, hinting at a way forward through the darkness of the present. Drawing on deep wells of history and experience, these powerful stories are sure to impress. -Publishers Weekly


      The so-called end times feel so perilously close right now. With such a cacophony of anxiety, despair, and cynicism bearing down on us, it is sometimes easy to forget that Indigenous peoples have been here before, and we still remain to uphold our responsibilities to the world and to one another. Our stories guide us forward into an ever-uncertain future, just as they guide us back home. And as editor Joshua Whitehead affirms in the introduction, Love after the End is a book we need right now - and well beyond the now. The stories here are difficult, they're beautiful, they're hilarious and sad and frightening and hopeful. But more than all of that, they guide us back to ourselves and to our relations on a shimmering trail of song and stardust. The two-spirit visionaries in this collection remind us in so many ways that the world is a wounded relative in need of healing, and that to abandon her in this time of trial is to betray the sacred bonds of kinship that we were meant to carry with courage and compassion. I am grateful beyond words that this book is in the world, and grateful to the writers, artists, and editor for the gift of (re)imagining futures where Indigenous love, liberation, and laughter flourish far beyond the settler imaginary. -Daniel Heath Justice, author of Why Indigenous Literatures Matter


      Each of these smart, stunning, imaginative stories has not only fuelled my imagination but also filled my heart, reminding me how dramatically different it is to experience work written with absolute love. Reading Love after the End is like being handed a glass of fresh water in the middle of the desert. -Alicia Elliott, author of A Mind Spread Out on the Ground


      These stories are a welcome breath of fresh air in the often hyperindividualist, survivalist subgenre of postapocalyptic fiction, and are essential reading for anyone committed to the possibilities of sf as a means to create new and different futures. -Booklist (STARRED REVIEW)


      In these pages, survival is a collective exercise. And amid the chaos and instability of each tale, there are exquisite moments of intimacy depicted in every story, reminding the reader that love is always a reason to live. -Vancouver Sun

  • 2
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    Kimiko Does Cancer A Graphic Memoir Kimiko Tobimatsu Canada, Keet Geniza Canada
    9781551528199 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Nonfiction Publication Date:September 03, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 8 x 10 x 0.3 in | 410 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A moving and honest graphic memoir about the unexpected cancer journey of a young, queer, mixed-race woman.

      At the age of twenty-five, Kimiko Tobimatsu was a young, queer, mixed-race woman with no history of health problems whose world was turned upside down when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. In an instant, she became immersed in a new and complicated life of endless appointments, evaluations, and treatments, and difficult conversations with her partner and parents. Kimiko knew that this wasn't what being twenty-five was supposed to be like ... but then, she didn't have a choice.

      With tender illustrations by Keet Geniza, Kimiko Does Cancer is a graphic memoir that upends the traditional cancer narrative from a young woman's perspective, confronting issues such as dating while in menopause, navigating work and treatment, and talking to well-meaning friends, health care professionals, and other cancer survivors with viewpoints different from her own. Not one for pink ribbons or runs for the cure, Kimiko seeks connection within the cancer community while also critiquing the mainstream cancer experience.

      Honest and poignant, Kimiko Does Cancer is about finding one's own way out of a health crisis.

      Two-colour throughout.

      Bio
      Kimiko Tobimatsu is an employment and human rights lawyer by day. Kimiko Does Cancer, based on her own experience, is her first book.

      Keet Geniza is a Filipinx-Canadian illustrator and comic artist. Born and raised in Manila, she moved to Toronto in 2006 and has since immersed herself in zines and comics as a way to document her struggles as a queer immigrant woman of colour. Kimiko Does Cancer is her first book.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Joe Shuster Award for Best Writer 2022, Winner
      Joe Shuster Award for Best Artist 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Beautifully drawn and candidly told, Kimiko Does Cancer asks important questions about how to move forward when you've seemingly beaten cancer, yet it continues to affect every part of your life - from your body and self-image to your relationships and sense of purpose. Kimiko leads us, with openness and vulnerability, on a cancer journey focused less on survival and more on how best to live while staying true to herself. -Teresa Wong, author of Dear Scarlet


      This is an important and insightful cancer memoir that does not try to laugh off the suffering and anguish that a cancer diagnosis brings. Aided by Keet Geniza's compelling illustrations, Kimiko brings an original queer perspective to the genre, dealing with issues of masculinity, body image, reproduction, identity and self-worth, raising questions that this reader had not previously considered. Excellent! -Ian Williams, author of The Bad Doctor


      With honesty, humility, and humour, Kimiko Does Cancer challenges cliches and what we think we know about being diagnosed with and treated for cancer. A triumph! -MK Czerwiec, author of Taking Turns: Stories from HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371


      An engaging and inspirational account of dealing with illness and its perception. -Kirkus Reviews


      Geniza's expressive figure drawings show a keen eye for the close-up, with a simple color palate of muted blues, blacks, and grays that call to mind Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Kimiko's strong debut offers a fresh perspective in the growing graphic medicine category. -Publishers Weekly


      Candidly written and lovingly illustrated, this graphic novel details the author's fight against breast cancer as a 25-year-old queer woman. As much a critique on the mainstream cancer movement as it is a tome on finding one's own way through, this is a perspective on the journey rarely seen in print. -Ms. Magazine


      The best graphic novel autobiographies provide insight into the lives of remarkable people and Kimiko Tobimatsu's story, complemented by the highly skilled art of Keet Geniza, is a particularly special privilege for us. -Toronto Star


      A frank and moving look at what it means to have cancer, and how your life can change once you become a cancer survivor. -CBC Books ("Best Canadian Comics of 2020")


      Giving readers a vivid glimpse of cancer as a deeply emotional, interior experience, Tobimatsu and Geniza create a non-linear story of recovery that is funny, lively, and full of honest self-reflection. -Plenitude Magazine

  • 3
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    Our Work Is Everywhere An Illustrated Oral History of Queer and Trans Resistance Syan Rose, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha Canada
    9781551528151 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Contemporary Women Publication Date:March 01, 2021
    $23.95 CAD 9 x 12 x 0.25 in | 540 gr | 92 pages Carton Quantity:25 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A visually stunning graphic non-fiction book on queer and trans resistance.

      Over the past ten years, we have witnessed the rise of queer and trans communities that have defied and challenged those who have historically opposed them. Through bold, symbolic imagery and surrealist, overlapping landscapes, queer illustrator and curator Syan Rose shines a light on the faces and voices of these diverse, amorphous, messy, real, and imagined queer and trans communities.

      In their own words, queer and trans organizers, artists, healers, comrades, and leaders speak honestly and authentically about their own experiences with power, love, pain, and magic to create a textured and nuanced portrait of queer and trans realities in America. The many themes include Black femme mental health, Pacific Islander authorship, fat queer performance art, disability and health care practice, sex worker activism, and much more. Accompanying the narratives are Rose's startling and sinuous images that brings these leaders' words to visual life.

      Our Work Is Everywhere is a graphic non-fiction book that underscores the brilliance and passion of queer and trans resistance.

      Includes a foreword by Lambda Literary Award-winning author and activist Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, author of Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice.

      Full-colour throughout.

      Bio
      Syan Rose is an illustrator and comic artist whose work plays with both surrealist and representational imagery to approach topics of personal history, politics, accountability, and healing. Sheâ??s been published in Bitch, Slate, Gay Magazine, Truthout, and Autostraddle, and has self-produced many comics and zines.

      Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (she/they) is a mixed-blood, middle-aged, nonbinary femme disabled and autistic writer, disability and transformative justice cultural and movement worker of Burgher and Tamil Sri Lankan, Irish and Galician ascent. A crip web weaver, couch and porch witch, they are the author and/or co-editor of nine books, including Beyond Survival ((with Ejeris Dixon), Tonguebreaker, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice, Dirty River, and Bodymap. A Lambda Literary Award winner who has been shortlisted for the Publishing Triangle five times, they are the winner of Lambda's 2020 Jeanne Cordova Award "honoring a lifetime of work documenting the complexities of queer of color/femme/disabled experience" and are a 2020 Disability Futures Fellow. Raised in rustbelt central Massachusetts and shaped by T'karonto and Oakland, they currently make home in Massachusetts. They are an adaptive trike rider and a triple grand water trine. Their newest book, The Future Is Disabled: Prophecies, Love Notes and Mourning Songs, will be published in fall 2022.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Lambda Literary Award 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Our Work Is Everywhere embodies its own name, as every page offers wisdom everywhere; whether we are taking in narratives of resistance and survival from across the queer community; or witnessing the visual spectacle that holds every word in handwritten text and illustrations. From surviving class warfare and structural oppression, to allowing our bodies to experience the tender calm that queer resistance begs for, Our Work Is Everywhere is a collection of interviews, stories, and lessons on reworking and rewriting power. -Cristy Road Carrera, author and artist, Next World Tarot and Spit and Passion


      With this honest exploration of the lives of some of the most marginalized people in society, Syan Rose has crafted an artwork that is profoundly moving and inspiring. -BOMB


      In this collection, Syan Rose has created full, lovely and sensitively drawn portraits of the humans who set the world aright. -Molly Crabapple, author of Drawing Blood, and Brothers of the Gun with Marwan Hisham

      Syan Rose is an artist who is deeply dedicated to the narratives of her Queer and Trans communities. In Our Work Is Everywhere, Sarah transforms the comics genre into short form poetic portraits of her peers and elders with such tenderness, love, and reverence. -Jessica de Jesus, creative director at Bitch Media


      A unique, empowering addition to LGBTQ+ literature. -Kirkus Reviews


      An inspirational volume for current and aspiring queer community workers to 'keep showing up' to build a better world together. -Publishers Weekly


      Reading this beautiful collection of oral histories and interviews feels likes sitting down with a bunch of rad queer and trans artists, healers, and activists, and listening to them talk about what inspires them, angers them, fuels them. The art is truly unique - each page feels like its own work of art. Here you'll find stories about ancestral wisdom, the power of queer tarot, mutual aid organizations, community gardening initiatives, radical wealth redistribution, and so much more more. It's an inspiring book spilling over with LGBTQ+ brilliance and creativity. -Book Riot


      This genre-bending anthology about queer and trans resistance packs a big punch for a short book. It moves between interviews, essays, conversations, and more, all accompanied by Rose's intricate, expansive illustrations. Containing both rage and celebration, the book explores topics such as Black femme mental health, sex worker activism, and queer fat performance art. -Autostraddle ("Best Queer Books of the Year")

  • 4
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    The Name I Call Myself Hasan Namir Canada, Cathryn John Canada
    9781551528090 Hardcover JUVENILE FICTION / Family Age (years) from 5 - 9 Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 10 x 8 x 0.4 in | 420 gr | 40 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A sweet and moving picture book depicting Ari's gender journey from childhood to adolescence in order to discover who they really are.

      Meet Ari, a young person who doesn't like to be called by their birth name Edward: "When I think of the name Edward, I imagine old kings who snore a lot." Throughout this beautiful and engaging picture book, we watch Ari grow up before our very eyes as they navigate the ins and outs of their gender identity; we see how, as a child, they prefer dolls and princess movies, and want to grow out their hair, though their father insists on cutting it short, "because thatâ??s what boys look like." At nine, they play hockey but wish they could try on their mother's dresses; at fifteen, they shave their face, hoping to have smooth skin like the girls. At sixteen, they want to run away, especially from their father, who insists, "You're a boy, so you have to act like one." Who will Ari become?

      Moving from age six to adolescence, The Name I Call Myself touchingly depicts Edward's tender, solitary gender journey to Ari: a new life distinguished and made meaningful by self-acceptance and unconditional love.

      Bio

      Hasan Namir was born in Iraq in 1987 and came to Canada at a young age. He graduated from Simon Fraser University with a BA in English. His debut novel God in Pink won the Lambda Literary Award for gay fiction in 2016. His other titles are the poetry book War/Torn and the children's picture book The Name I Call Myself. He lives in Surrey, BC.



      Cathryn John is an illustrator and designer with a passion for social equity and the environment. Her practice includes a range of mediums from acrylic painting to woodworking. Cathryn is an international award-winning designer for "The Plant Project" which works to improve people's relationships with plants. She lives in Vancouver.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Hasan Namir's heartwarming book is a countdown to self-love. Each page is a lesson in courage through Namir's succinct text and Cathryn John's imaginative illustrations. -Catherine Hernandez, author of I Promise and Scarborough


      All kids need to see that there are many ways to be in the world - and that even if some people don't understand, in the end, it is what you know about yourself that matters most. -Robin Stevenson, author of Pride Colors


      Beautiful words and illustrations come together to show the vulnerability, endurance, and beauty of growing up, and finding the strength to be who you really are. -Dina Del Bucchia, author of Don't Tell Me What to Do


      Hasan Namir (author) and Cathryn John (illustrator) build a meaningful back-and-forth dialogue between text and image in order to explore what it means to be a nonbinary young person in a less-than-welcoming world focused on binaries and conformity. -CM


      What makes this work particularly impressive is how many of the concerns Ari faces are issues children encounter regardless of their gender identities. While Ari will particularly resonate with queer kids, their fears and secret joys are sure to speak volumes to any outsider or someone in need of a friend. -Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

  • 5
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    9781551528175 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Fantasy Age (years) from 14 Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $18.95 CAD 7 x 10 x 0.3 in | 320 gr | 108 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A visionary young-adult illustrated novel about Eggs, a homeless girl who knows how to fly.

      In a rusted unnamed city full of five-dollar hotels and flea markets, a young homeless girl named Eggs is trying to make her way in the world. She's shy and bold at the same time, and wary of strangers, but she is convinced beyond all reason that she can fly.

      And fly she does, from rooftop to rooftop, from chimneys to phone wires; she scurries up the sides of buildings and sneaks into secret lairs. Eggs is a loner, but she makes two friends: Grack, who sells 100 different kinds of hot dogs from his bicycle cart, and Splendid Wren, a punk rocker whose open window Eggs came crashing through one night. Both Grack and Splendid Wren try their best to protect her, but Eggs meets her match when on a cold night she swoops onto a rooftop and steals a warm jacket belonging to Robin, a neighbourhood baddie with anger management issues. Can Eggs elude his wrathful revenge?

      Beguiling and otherworldly, The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly is a fevered dream about a young girlâ??s flights of fancy in order to survive, and to thrive.

      Ages 14 and up.

      Full-colour throughout.

      Bio
      Sybil Lamb is the author of the illustrated YA novel The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason that She Could Fly. Her writing and art have appeared in books, magazines, comix, alleys and tattoos. Her novel I've Got a Time Bomb was published by Topside Press.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Every page of this beautiful dream of a book made my heart skip. Eggs is the most lovable, winning character I've met in a long time. -Casey Plett, author of Little Fish


      Sybil Lamb elevates the chapter book format with this incredible tale of love, friendship, solidarity, and the magic of building beautiful things in unlikely places. Eggs is a superhero for these times and the world she (probably) flies through is full of characters (punks, hipsters, knitters, and hot dog vendors) so alive and oddly familiar readers will embrace them like neighbours from a place they never knew they belonged. I cannot wait to read this with the kids in my life. -Cory Silverberg, author of What Makes a Baby


      Author and illustrator Lamb conjures an eccentric and original world of $5 punk hotels and multigenerational hot dogâ??business families and writes with a fantastical style that leaves readers perpetually wide-eyed in wonder. -Kirkus Reviews


      Lamb brings fairy-tale wonderment to the cityscape, crossed with cultural touchstones of transient, underhoused, and homeless communities. -Quill and Quire


      Eggs is one of the more unique characters readers will ever meet in young adult novels ... [The book] leaves a great deal open for interpretation and discussion and is the product of a vivid and extravagant imagination. -CM (Canadian Review of Materials)

  • 6
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    God Loves Hair: Tenth Anniversary Edition Vivek Shraya Canada, Juliana Neufeld Canada, Cherie Dimaline Canada
    9781551528137 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT FICTION / LGBTQ+ Age (years) from 12 Publication Date:August 15, 2020
    $24.95 CAD 8 x 5 x 0.5 in | 300 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A tenth-anniversary edition of Vivek Shraya's first book: a YA story collection that celebrates racial, gender, and religious diversity.

      In 2010, Vivek Shraya self-published God Loves Hair, her first book; since then, Vivek has published six more titles, including a novel, poetry collection, graphic novel, and children's picture book, while also working as an artist, musician, and academic.

      God Loves Hair is a collection of short stories that follows a tender, intelligent, and curious child who navigates the complex realms of gender creativity, queerness, brownness, religion, and belonging. This tenth-anniversary edition, published in hardcover for the first time, includes a foreword by award-winning YA writer Cherie Dimaline (The Marrow Thieves), as well as a new preface, story, and illustrations.

      Told with the poignant insight and honesty that only the voice of a young narrator can convey, God Loves Hair is a moving and ultimately joyous portrait of the resiliency of youth.

      Bio

      Vivek Shraya is an artist whose body of work crosses the boundaries of music, literature, visual art, theatre, and film. Her books include I'm Afraid of Men, The Subtweet, even this page is white, She of the Mountains, Death Threat, and The Boy & the Bindi, and her album with Queer Songbook Orchestra, Part-Time Woman, was nominated for the Polaris Music Prize. She is one half of the music duo Too Attached and the founder of the Arsenal Pulp Press imprint VS. Books. A six-time Lambda Literary Award finalist, Vivek was a Pride Toronto Grand Marshal, was featured on The Globe and Mail's Best Dressed list, and has received honours from the Writers' Trust of Canada and the Publishing Triangle. She is a director on the board of the Tegan and Sara Foundation and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Calgary.



      Juliana Neufeld is an award-winning illustrator and mixed media artist living in Toronto, Canada. Her work has been inspired by the whimsy of children's illustration, journal art, and an obsession with textiles. Her work can be found in books, album covers, and in nooks and crannies throughout the Internet.



      Cherie Dimaline is a member of the Georgian Bay Metis Community. Her 2017 book The Marrow Thieves won the Governor General's Award and the Kirkus Prize for Young Readers. Her most recent book is Empire of Wild.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      A lyrical meditation on growing up queer, brown, and Hindu ... Each vignette beautifully captures the tension Shraya's younger self felt navigating the intersections of gender, race, and faith. The author's stunningly honest voice is suffused with tenderness not only for her past self, but also for other young people currently coming to terms with multiple identities in families and societies that may not be accepting of their full selves. -Kirkus Reviews (STARRED)

  • 7
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    Like a Boy but Not a Boy Navigating Life, Mental Health, and Parenthood Outside the Gender Binary andrea bennett Canada
    9781551528212 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $21.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.8 in | 325 gr | 272 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A revelatory book about gender, mental illness, parenting, mortality, bike mechanics, work, class, and the task of living in a body.

      Inquisitive and expansive, Like a Boy but Not a Boy explores author andrea bennett's experiences with gender expectations, being a non-binary parent, and the sometimes funny and sometimes difficult task of living in a body. The book's fourteen essays also delve incisively into the interconnected themes of mental illness, mortality, creative work, class, and bike mechanics (apparently you can learn a lot about yourself through trueing a wheel).

      In "Tomboy," andrea articulates what it means to live in a gender in-between space, and why one might be necessary; "37 Jobs 21 Houses" interrogates the notion that the key to a better life is working hard and moving house. And interspersed throughout the book is "Everyone Is Sober and No One Can Drive," sixteen stories about queer millennials who grew up and came of age in small Canadian communities.

      With the same poignant spirit as Ivan Coyote's Tomboy Survival Guide, Like a Boy addresses the struggle to find acceptance, and to accept oneself; and how one can find one's place while learning to make space for others. The book also wonders what it means to be an atheist and search for faith that everything will be okay; what it means to learn how to love life even as you obsess over its brevity; and how to give birth, to bring new life, at what feels like the end of the world.

      With thoughtfulness and acute observation, andrea bennett reveals intimate truths about the human experience, whether one is outside the gender binary or not.

      Bio
      andrea bennett is a National Magazine Award-winning writer and editor and the author of one book of poetry (Canoodlers, Nightwood Editions) and two travel guides (Montreal and Quebec City, Moon Guides). Like a Boy but Not a Boy is andrea's first book of essays.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Chronicling everything from their work as a bike mechanic to the schisms in CanLit, from being bipolar to breastfeeding as a non-binary parent, the essays in andrea bennett's Like a Boy but Not a Boy are about what it means to live, work hard, and be othered in this jagged world. The undramatized care with which bennett offers us their own life, alongside the lives of other queer millennials in the multi-part essay 'Everyone Is Sober and No One Can Drive,' is a gift to queers like me who, in a world with too few queer stories, often worry they don't belong. I can't imagine anyone picking up this book and being unable to find themselves reflected in it. -John Elizabeth Stintzi, author of Vanishing Monuments and Junebat


      andrea bennett's measured and compassionate voice is compelling in these pages. Whether in their wonderfully wrought brief lives of young queer people, or in their parsing of, variously, mental health, class, the dismantling of the Republic of Gender, the art and science of life partnering and non-binary child rearing, alienation within families, the tyranny of the body, and (what else?) bicycle repair, their humanity, intelligence, learning, and gift for synthesis shines bright. That Like a Boy but Not a Boy will appeal to their millennial cohort is certain, and I'm confident that hoarier generations of readers will relish, just as much, the wit and wisdom of a writer who wants 'to understand how people believe what they believe, and why they do what they do.' -Bill Richardson, author of I Saw Three Ships: West End Stories


      andrea bennett brings to the traditional tasks of the personal essay - radical candour, alertness to sensations and ideas - an exciting political intensity. Consistently interesting, bennett's prose is lucid and provocative, and her insights often take turns you don't expect. Like a Boy but Not a Boy transforms the exploration of self and world into high-stakes writing. -Carmine Starnino, editor for The Walrus


      Like a Boy but Not a Boy sneaks into daily reflections, quietly at first, and then with more volume and urgency. andrea bennett introduces would-be friends who turn conventional ideas about gender over and sideways just by existing. They recount relationships and TV shows that defined their queer discovery, and the societal hazards that made existence a struggle along the way. Woven into this friendly chorus is bennett's own point of view, which is more forceful in its criticism of work and parenting norms. These essays give space to reflect on how labels are applied and misapplied, and how we might describe our internal worlds better. It's like a salve for all the ways our parents and pasts have fucked us up. -Sarah Berman, author of Don't Call It a Cult


      Exploring beyond binary conceptions of gender, bennett shares fresh perspectives on subjects cerebral and practical. -Kirkus Reviews


      Spanning from their tumultuous and emotionally abusive youth and persistent obsession with death to their anxiety-ridden pregnancy and attempts to learn to take life slowly, bennett's essays fit together like pieces of a puzzle, each exploring a given idea - bicycle repair and its relation to the mechanic's own body; bipolar disorder and needing to be one of "the good sick" - while allowing its implications to ripple out among the rest ... Both moving and illuminating, this stirring series of reflections is definitely worth picking up. -Publishers Weekly


      A distinctive, appealing, and candid essay collection about nonbinary life. -Foreword Reviews

  • 8
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    Vancouver Exposed Searching for the City's Hidden History Eve Lazarus Canada
    9781551528298 Paperback HISTORY / Canada Publication Date:September 21, 2020
    $32.95 CAD 8.5 x 10 x 0.55 in | 905 gr | 296 pages Carton Quantity:16 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      As the author of such BC bestsellers as Cold Case Vancouver, Murder by Milkshake, and SensationalVancouver, Australian-born Eve Lazarus has become adept at combining her well-honed investigative skills with an abiding love for her adopted city. These qualities are on full display in her latest book, an exploration of Vancouver’s hidden past through the city’s neighbourhoods, institutions, people, and events.

      Vancouver Exposed is a nostalgic romp through the city’s past, from buried houses to nudist camps, from bellyflop contests to eccentric museums. Featuring historic black-and-white and colour photographs throughout, the book reveals the true heart of the city: one that is endlessly evolving and always full of surprises.

       With equal parts humour and pathos, Vancouver Exposed is a vividly entertaining and informative book that pays homage to the Vancouver you never knew existed.
      Bio

      Eve Lazarus is a reporter, author, and the host and producer of the true crime podcast Cold Case Canada. She is the author of four Arsenal titles: Cold Case Vancouver: The City's Most Baffling Unsolved Murders (2015), a BC bestseller and 2016 finalist for the Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award at the BC Book Prizes; Blood, Sweat, and Fear: The Story of Inspector Vance, Vancouver's First Forensic Investigator (2017); Murder by Milkshake: An Astonishing True Story of Adultery, Arsenic, and a Charismatic Killer (2018); and Vancouver Exposed: Searching for the City's Hidden History (2020). She is also the author of Sensational Vancouver (2014), , Sensational Victoria: Bright Lights, Red Lights, Murders, Ghosts & Gardens (2012), and her book At Home with History: The Untold Secrets of Greater Vancouver's Heritage Houses was a 2008 City of Vancouver book award finalist.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Bill Duthie Booksellers Choice Prize (BC and Yukon Book Prizes) 2021, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Eve Lazarus is a reporter whose beat is Vancouver's past. She pursues the stories behind the headlines and relics of yesteryear, adding richness and entertaining detail through deep research and interviews with local characters she finds through her blog and social media. This is the twenty-first-century way to tell history - from the bottom up rather than from the top looking down. -Michael Kluckner, author of Vancouver Remembered and Toshiko


      Eve had me constantly jumping to Google Street View! Buried houses! Tunnels! Investigative tidbits! All the good stuff! All the bad stuff! All the sad stuff! Doot doola doot doo ... Vancouver Exposed! -Nardwuar the Human Serviette


      Think you know Vancouver? Well, Eve Lazarus has some stories for you. Fond, funny, and fizzing with some of the most fascinating people and places, Vancouver Exposed is a highly readable and revelatory cultural history chock-a-block with as many illuminating photos as insights into the city itself. -Aaron Chapman, author of Vancouver after Dark


      Vancouver Exposed is exemplary popular history. -BC Bookworld

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    Butter Honey Pig Bread Francesca Ekwuyasi Canada
    9781551528236 Paperback FICTION / Sagas Publication Date:September 03, 2020
    $23.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.8 in | 510 gr | 368 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      2021 CANADA READS FINALIST

      Longlisted for the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize; finalist, Governor General's Literary Award; finalist, Amazon Canada First Novel Award; finalist, Lambda Literary Award

      An intergenerational saga about three Nigerian women: a novel about food, family, and forgiveness.

      Butter Honey Pig Bread is a story of choices and their consequences, of motherhood, of the malleable line between the spirit and the mind, of finding new homes and mending old ones, of voracious appetites, of queer love, of friendship, faith, and above all, family.

      Francesca Ekwuyasi's debut novel tells the interwoven stories of twin sisters, Kehinde and Taiye, and their mother, Kambirinachi. Kambirinachi feels she was born an Ogbanje, a spirit that plagues families with misfortune by dying in childhood to cause its mother misery. She believes that she has made the unnatural choice of staying alive to love her human family and now lives in fear of the consequences of that decision.

      Some of Kambirinachi's worst fears come true when her daughter, Kehinde, experiences a devasting childhood trauma that causes the family to fracture in seemingly irreversible ways. As soon as she's of age, Kehinde moves away and cuts contact with her twin sister and mother. Alone in Montreal, she struggles to find ways to heal while building a life of her own. Meanwhile, Taiye, plagued by guilt for what happened to her sister, flees to London and attempts to numb the loss of the relationship with her twin through reckless hedonism.

      Now, after more than a decade of living apart, Taiye and Kehinde have returned home to Lagos to visit their mother. It is here that the three women must face each other and address the wounds of the past if they are to reconcile and move forward.

      Bio

      Francesca Ekwuyasi is a writer, artist, and filmmaker born in Lagos, Nigeria. Her work explores themes of faith, family, queerness, consumption, loneliness, and belonging. Her writing has been published in Winter Tangerine Review, Brittle Paper, Transition Magazine, the Malahat Review, Visual Art News, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, and GUTS magazine. Her story "Orun is Heaven" was longlisted for the 2019 Journey Prize. Butter Honey Pig Bread, longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, is her first novel.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2020, Long-listed
      Canada Reads 2021, Short-listed
      Lambda Literary Award 2021, Short-listed
      Governor General's Literary Award 2021, Short-listed
      Amazon First Novel Award 2021, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Francesca Ekwuyasi is a new and exciting voice, the kind of writer whose work both challenges and enlightens. With Butter Honey Pig Bread, she has written a deeply moving novel that explores trauma, healing, and the beautifully complex relationships between mothers and daughters with vivid honesty. This is an inspiring debut. -Zeba Blay, senior culture writer, Huffington Post


      In this remarkable debut novel, a family of Nigerian women attempt to carefully tiptoe around an unspeakable tragedy. Through masterfully crafted scenes full of sumptuous imagery, readers are moved, just as these characters are, by forces beyond their control, beyond their lifetimes. -Catherine Hernandez, author of Scarborough


      This multi-continental tale is alight with the force of its characters' sway between history and the present, home and country, family - chosen and otherwise. Where expectations of genre leave their own delicious signatures across fabulism, the folkloric, the strange, and a mercurial realism, the queerness and sensuality of this debut novel excites. Butter Honey Pig Bread roves taste-first through the ingredients of things that mark the modern, if enduring, currents of familial and amorous bonds by a writer of ample talent. -Canisia Lubrin, author of The Dyzgraphxst


      A luminous talent reveals itself in debut novelist Francesca Ekwuyasi's Butter Honey Pig Bread. This intergenerational tale of three Nigerian women finding their way through a maze of love, memory, and trauma weaves a haunting spell over the reader from its very first word. Ekwuyasi's sensuous prose, deft plotting, and keen insights into human nature combine to form a vision that feels like peering deep into the souls of a trio of dear friends. At once delicious and heartbreaking, Butter Honey Pig Bread will leave the reader full, yet longing for more. -Kai Cheng Thom, author of I Hope We Choose Love


      In this incandescent book, Francesca Ekwuyasi travels across continents and time to tell the story of an Ogbanje mother and her two estranged daughters in sensuous, mythic prose that pulled me into their interwoven narratives. Dissolution of spirit and mind, alienation, painful familial rifts, and queer desire reverberate through this gorgeous debut. Ekwuyasi's wondrous way with language is a profound gift. -Tanais, author of Bright Lines


      The descriptions throughout the novel, from Taiye's cooking to the feel of Lagos to the urgency of new love, invite readers to fully savor Ekwuyasi's language. Mixing emotional depth with supernatural elements, this is a masterful debut. -Booklist (STARRED REVIEW)


      Ekwuyasi's magical debut delves into the reverberating effects of a Nigerian mother's choices on her twin daughters' lives. The stories of Kambirinachi and her daughters, Taiye and Kehinde, unfold in lyrical, emotionally affecting parallel narratives ... Written in sizzling prose, Ekwuyasi's assured, inspired debut will impress fans of Akwaeke Emezi. -Publishers Weekly (STARRED REVIEW)


      It is a rare pleasure when a debut novel appears with such a fully realized, confident voice as Francesca Ekwuyasi's Butter Honey Pig Bread. -Quill and Quire ("Books of the Year")


      Ekwuyasi's prose conjures up a particular energy and literary finesse reminiscent of Akwaeke Emezi's Freshwater. -The Puritan


      In this remarkably assured debut, three women search to reconnect after an event tore them apart. It's sexy, too, and it'll make you hungry with all its talk of food. -The Globe and Mail ("Globe 100: Best Books of the Year")


      Spanning decades, this fast-paced debut novel moves from Lagos to Montreal, Halifax, and London as it traces the sorrows and triumphs of a pair of estranged twin sisters and their troubled mother ... The novel abounds with sex, death, and food - whose preparation offers these characters catharsis, knowledge, and sometimes simply pleasure. -The New Yorker

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    Arborescent Marc Herman Lynch Canada
    9781551528311 Paperback FICTION / Asian American Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $18.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.7 in | 330 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Ghosts, doppelgangers, and a man who turns into a tree: a startling fiction debut that strives to articulate the Asian immigrant body.

      In the beltline of a run-of-the-mill Canadian metropolis, an apartment complex called Cambrian Court has become the focal point of an outlandish unfurling, where even the laws of physics are becoming questioned. Embroiled within this psychic plot are three neighbours - Nohlan Buckles, Hachiko Yoshimoto, and Zadie Chan - complete strangers whose ordinary lives have become rife with bizarre antagonists: an ogrish landlord, a fanatical romantic, a psychic horticulturalist. The further they are drawn into this otherworld the more reality becomes suspect: Nohlan is convinced he's turning into a tree; Hachiko's staging of a kabuki comes to life; and Zadie unwittingly begins to produce doppelgangers. Distant at first, they come to realize just how dependent and intertwined their lives are.

      In Marc Herman Lynch's debut novel, some people explode, and others come back to life, but at the heart of it all are the fleeting yet indelible connections we make with one another. Darkly funny, lyrically charged, and gothically absurd, Arborescent is a raw and brilliantly imagined depiction of our disconnected contemporary world.

      Bio
      Marc Herman Lynch is a first generation, French-Chinese immigrant. He has an MA from the University of Calgary and is the president of filling Station magazine. Arborescent is his first novel. He lives in Calgary.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      An ambitious, experimental book which hums with unsettling energy and wild imagination. -Alberta Views


      Beautifully bizarre, bleakly hilarious, and a teensy bit frightening, this is a truly original novel about the Asian immigrant experience. Lynch is a natural storyteller, spinning otherworldly prose into a creepily delicious tapestry, merging threads of the unexpected with strange and astonishing elements of fairy tale and mythology. Arborescent is at once unsettling, immersive, and dream-like. A unique and marvelous debut. -Lindsay Wong, author of The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family


      A lyrical, psychedelic exploration of our connection to our cities, ourselves, and to nature. A man becomes a tree, a girl becomes a ghost, and a world traumatized by climate chaos undergoes pained transformation. Marc Herman Lynch might be Canada's Murakami, and his debut is vibrant, timely, and wildly imaginative. -Deborah Willis, author of The Dark and Other Love Stories


      Marc Herman Lynch's debut pulsates with fecund magic, the Western Canadian landscape creeping and growing into the bodies of its human settlers, exploding them, taking root in them, masking and multiplying them. Lynch is a writer to watch, one whose kaleidoscopic lens brings the hidden into view, exposing once-familiar places as strange, seething with life, death, and everything in between. -Naomi K. Lewis, author of Tiny Lights for Travellers


      Arborescent sparkles from the very first page with brilliant, funny, and provocative prose, showing not only Marc Herman Lynch's luminous skill with fiction as a genre but an artistry with language that raises this work into the echelons of fine poetry. Lynch has written one of those rare novels where as a reader you'll miss the book when you finally reach the ending - the world he has written here is so layered and vivid, the characters and their relationships and tribulations so entrancing, you won't want to leave. This is a lovely and powerful book. -Suzette Mayr, author of Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall


      Marc Herman Lynch's debut novel is an intricately woven intertext that epically reimagines Yotsuya Kaidan in the prairie lands of Treaty 7. Find three characters, Nohlan Buckles, Hachiko Yoshimoto, and Zadie Chan, whose stories braid together in their shared setting of Cambrian Court. Each experiences disembodiment - albeit in the form of a vengeful yurei, the tree of life, or a tattooed mise en abyme - in such a way that Lynch asks us to ponder why the word 'body' is such a necessary odyssey. I am reminded of Toni Morrison's Beloved in the way Lynch animates a home, of Marian Engel's Bear through his spindling webbing of genre, and of Tracey Lindberg's Birdie in his ability to capture the limitations of the human vessel. Lynch has a philosophical ear for language and an overwhelming love for the 'lush smell of nouns' as he interrogates magnitude, size, and scale: here, even a fish's bladder becomes a lens from which to see the world queerly anew. A gorgeous debut, Arborescent, and its ponderings of annihilation, astrology, embodiment, and the Anthropocene, is fated to enter the literary scene ablaze. -Joshua Whitehead, author of Jonny Appleseed


      Marc Herman Lynch has given us a novel that is both socially daring and full of wonders. At times hilarious, at others macabre, Arborescent successfully knits together Asian and Western traditions of the fantastic to give us a work of startling originality and strangeness. Lynch has got a great eye for unusual detail, and a finely tuned sense of who his characters are. Magic is afoot in Moh'kins'tsis. A writer after my own heart. -Larissa Lai, author of The Tiger Flu


      With dark humour and rich language, Lynch explores the sullen, twisted worlds that can exist in one's mind. Arborescent will leave you questioning reality: enter at your own risk. -Maisonneuve


      A magical romp through a strangely familiar world ... Both thoughtful and challenging, Arborescent is a vital novel from a fresh new voice in Canadian literature. -Prairie Fire

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