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  • 1
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    Brotherhood to Nationhood George Manuel and the Making of the Modern Indian Movement 2nd edition Peter McFarlane Canada, Doreen Manuel Canada
    9781771135108 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $32.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.78 in | 514 gr | 342 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Charged with fresh material and new perspectives, this updated edition of the groundbreaking biography Brotherhood to Nationhood brings George Manuel and his fighting tradition into the present.

      George Manuel (1920–1989) was the strategist and visionary behind the modern Indigenous movement in Canada. A three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, he laid the groundwork for what would become the Assembly of First Nations and was the founding president of the World Council of Indigenous Peoples. Authors Peter McFarlane and Doreen Manuel follow him on a riveting journey from his childhood on a Shuswap reserve through three decades of fierce and dedicated activism.

      In these pages, an all-new foreword by celebrated Mi'kmaq lawyer and activist Pam Palmater is joined by an afterword from Manuel’s granddaughter, land defender Kanahus Manuel. This edition features new photos and previously untold stories of the pivotal roles that the women of the Manuel family played – and continue to play – in the battle for Indigenous rights.

      Bio

      Peter McFarlane is an author, journalist, and editor. His books include Northern Shadows: Canadians in Central America and Ancient Land, Ancient Sky: Following Canada’s Native Canoe Routes. He currently lives north of Montreal and is engaged in a number of writing and editing projects.



      Doreen Manuel (Secwepemc/Ktunaxa) comes from a long line of Indigenous oral historians and factual storytellers. She is an award-winning filmmaker and educator, the principal owner of Running Wolf Productions, and the director of the Bosa Centre for Film and Animation at Capilano University.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      IPPY Award Gold Medalist, Canada-West, Best Regional Non-Fiction 2022, Winner
      Reviews

      Brotherhood to Nationhood is more than just a biography of the life of George Manuel; it demonstrates the roots of an Indigenous internationalism and political theory that is grounded in the ethics, knowledge, and practices of the Secwepemc people.”


      “As a chronicle of postwar Indigenous resistance—from the back-breaking work of organizing communities to the building of the Assembly of First Nations and the fight for Aboriginal rights—this book is unmatched in its detail. As a testament to the many Indigenous women, without whom none of this could have happened, whose hard labour in struggling to keep families alive empowered that generation of Indigenous men, this book is even more important. Finally, as an exploration of the vision and strategic brilliance of George Manuel, and the power of his leadership, Brotherhood to Nationhood is without parallel. To understand the strength and clarity of today’s Indigenous activists and theorists, we must begin with George Manuel.”


      “We live in a time of colonial reconciliation amputated from truth, of extractive predation by the state and its citizenry, of denial and willful amnesia about Canada’s violent past and present. George Manuel’s decolonial vision speaks just as strongly today as during his lifetime, and it continues in the commitments of his family and his people. This new and expanded edition of Brotherhood to Nationhood reminds us of the transformative possibilities of a life’s work grounded in truth and a relentless commitment to decolonial justice. We need this book, more now than ever.”


      “Peter McFarlane’s classic biography of George Manuel is an intimate and meticulously researched history of the leader and his life’s work, discussing the critically important subject of Indigenous land and liberation. An absolute must-read.”


      “A gripping account of the life of a brilliant Indigenous leader whose vision remains a powerful blueprint for Canada’s unfinished business of decolonization. Like few books I know, it vividly conveys the sacrifices, rewards, and hard strategic choices involved in organizing for political change. The next generation of activists should read it to learn just how much we are indebted to the Manuel family’s legacy.”


      “This second edition, with updated text co-written by Doreen Manuel, includes brand new insights, including the key role Indigenous women played in George Manuel’s story. Uplifting and inspirational, this book honours the legacy of a visionary political strategist, refreshing our collective memory on how to combine tact with toughness, organize effectively, build respectful relationships, live humbly, and to treat every step—either forward or backward—as a new learning experience in the larger struggle for Indigenous rights.”


      Brotherhood to Nationhood is a necessary and critical book to read for anyone, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, who is interested in the life of George Manuel, one of the greatest contemporary Indigenous leaders in Canada and internationally.”

  • 2
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    Going Public A Survivor’s Journey from Grief to Action Julie Macfarlane Canada
    9781771134750 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sexual Abuse & Harassment Publication Date:September 14, 2020
    $27.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.57 in | 278 gr | 228 pages Carton Quantity:48 Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      It took Julie Macfarlane a lifetime to say the words out loud – the words that finally broke the calm and traveled farther than she could have imagined. In this clear-eyed account, she confronts her own silence and deeply rooted trauma to chart a remarkable course from sexual abuse victim to agent of change.

      Going Public merges the worlds of personal and professional, activism and scholarship. Drawing upon decades of legal training, Macfarlane decodes the well-worn methods used by church, school, and state to silence survivors, from first reporting to cross-examination to non-disclosure agreements. At the same time, she lays bare the isolation and exhaustion of going public in her own life, as she takes her abuser to court, challenges her colleagues, and weathers a defamation lawsuit.

      The result is far more than a memoir. It’s a courageous and essential blueprint on how to go toe-to-toe with the powers behind institutional abuse and protectionism. At long last, Macfarlane’s experiences bring her to the most important realization of her life: that only she can stand in her own shoes, and only she can stand up and speak about what happened to her.

      Bio

      Julie Macfarlane, author of Going Public: A Survivor's Journey from Grief to Action, is distinguished professor emerita of law at the University of Windsor. She is an advocate on sexual violence issues in government, community, and inside the legal system, and was named a member of the Order of Canada in 2020. Julie is the co-founder (with Zelda Perkins) of the Can’t Buy My Silence campaign to ban non-disclosure agreements. She lives in Windsor, Ontario.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Tom Fairley Award for Editorial Excellence 2021, Short-listed
      Reviews

      “Professor Julie Macfarlane provides a fascinating and invaluable insight into civil litigation involving sexual abuse claims and modern rape trials. Her openness and courage in disclosing her own experience of sexual abuse and her fight to improve institutional responses demonstrate a moral courage of awe-inspiring dimensions.”


      “This memoir, manifesto, an honest cri de coeur all wrapped in one of what sexual violence and abuse does to women must be read by all who seek justice, truth, reforms of a distorted legal system, and accountability for institutional cover-ups. Going Public is a page-turner of truth, bravery, persistence and morality by a leader of reform in the justice system. How she sought, and eventually gained, some small modicum of justice as she moved from legal professional to activist litigant is an extraordinary story.”


      Going Public is truly unique. It is embodied sexual violence scholarship that brings ‘the personal is political’ and ‘the political is personal’ to life. Macfarlane’s critical reflections on her own victimization, survival, resistance, advocacy, and activism are central to her insight and legal analysis. The result is simultaneously painful, inspiring, challenging, demoralizing, empowering, and practical, with recommendations for changes to civil and criminal law and institutional approaches for dealing with sexual violence. A must read.”


      “Julie Macfarlane dedicated her career to improving access to justice in Canada. After breaking her silence, Macfarlane’s personal search for justice will inspire readers. Going Public is more than a #MeToo memoir; it is a call to action to fundamentally change institutional responses to sexual violence.”


      “Few victims are brave enough to lay matters out in a comprehensive way especially to strangers no matter how genuine and interested those people are. I salute Dr. Macfarlane’s understanding that a book written not from an academic perspective, but a personal one, will be incredibly illuminating and help other victims understand that they are not alone.”


      “This book resonated with me both personally and professionally. We have many examples of institutions failing survivors, but only now are we starting to formally document the stories of complainants who have experienced institutional betrayal after reporting and the acute affects it has on their lives. It is time that we speak frankly about these issues in all their complexities out in the open instead of behind closed doors. Dr. Macfarlane is helping us do just that.”

  • 3
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    The Taste of Longing Ethel Mulvany and Her Starving Prisoners of War Cookbook Suzanne Evans Canada
    9781771134897 Paperback HISTORY / Military Publication Date:September 21, 2020
    $28.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.75 in | 523 gr | 306 pages Carton Quantity:11 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Half a world away from her home in Manitoulin Island, Ethel Mulvany is starving in Singapore’s infamous Changi Prison, along with hundreds of other women jailed there as POWs during the Second World War. They beat back pangs of hunger by playing decadent games of make-believe and writing down recipes filled with cream, raisins, chocolate, butter, cinnamon, ripe fruit – the unattainable ingredients of peacetime, of home, of memory.

      In this novelistic, immersive biography, Suzanne Evans presents a truly individual account of WWII through the eyes of Ethel – mercurial, enterprising, combative, stubborn, and wholly herself. The Taste of Longing follows Ethel through the fall of Singapore in 1942, the years of her internment, and beyond. As a prisoner, she devours dog biscuits and book spines, befriends spiders and smugglers, and endures torture and solitary confinement. As a free woman back in Canada, she fights to build a life for herself in the midst of trauma and burgeoning mental illness.

      Woven with vintage recipes and transcribed tape recordings, the story of Ethel and her fantastical POW Cookbook is a testament to the often-overlooked strength of women in wartime. It’s a story of the unbreakable power of imagination, generosity, and pure heart.

      Bio

      Dr. Suzanne Evans holds a PhD in Religious Studies. After working, studying, and living in China, Indonesia, India, and Vietnam, she now lives and writes in Ottawa. She is the author of Mothers of Heroes, Mothers of Martyrs: World War I and the Politics of Grief. Her writing, which has appeared in academic and literary journals, newspapers, magazines, and books, has a strong focus on women and war.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Award - Biography (Adult Nonfiction) 2020, Winner
      Taste Canada Award, Culinary Narratives 2021, Winner
      Ottawa Book Award, English Non-Fiction 2021, Winner
      Reviews

      Suzanne Evans’s important and compelling account of a gifted and courageous Manitoulin Island woman who wanted to make a difference is a page-turner. With sensitivity, craft, and imagination, Evans significantly expands our understanding of Canadian women’s contributions to our history.


      The book takes the reader on a vivid journey, following Ethel Mulvany from Manitoulin Island to the prison camp at Changi, Singapore, and back again. Evans combines meticulous research with a very readable writing style to create a sweeping narrative that touches on food history, the history of mental illness and its treatment, and the experiences of civilians and POWs during the Second World War.


      I loved every minute of The Taste of Longing. Evans has captured Ethel, and put her in context, not shirking (or misunderstanding!) those complex aspects of her character that both pushed her to greatness, but also ultimately caused her so much suffering at times. This is an “I-can’t-put-it-down” book, an historical biography that reads like a novel—an ordinary life made extraordinary through circumstance and an inordinate amount of courage.


      "Suzanne Evans brings a novelist’s eye and an historian’s diligence to the story of Ethel Mulvany, a small-town girl with audacious ambitions and boundless confidence who embarks on?a?quixotic tour of the Asian Pacific on the brink of WWII. Amid the perils of war, she proves a courageous and clever survivor, enduring imprisonment, starvation and torture during the war, and a creative and resourceful entrepreneur and benefactor in the life she rebuilds for herself in Canada after her liberation.?In Suzanne Evans’ hands,?Mulvany’s story?becomes?moving, inspiring and unforgettable."


      “As gripping as a novel, The Taste of Longing is infused with Suzanne Evans’ keen sense of psychology and language. Its plot is made all the more riveting by the historical facts of the deprivation of the prisoners of war in Changi Prison. Ethel was a remarkable and fearless woman. This vivid biography is also a uniquely female history, infused with nourishment no less important for being imaginary.”


      This is a story of hardship, cruelty, and disease—but also of endurance, indomitability, and friendship. Centred around a remarkable cookbook, Evans vividly recounts Ethel’s resilience and commemoration of the war that marked her for life.


      This is a story about an unusual woman in an unbearable situation. Evans has delved deep and written with great sympathy about the long drama of picking up the pieces of a broken life.


      A fascinating story that begs to be told. Ethel directs the voyage of her life from her anchor, rural Manitoulin Island, to Changi Prison, where her energy and creativity did much to sustain the bodies and spirits of the some 400 women and children interned there. Among her projects were imaginary teas and dinner parties, fashion shows and quilts, and most poignant of all, a cookbook of remembered recipes the women longed for.


      Ethel’s experiences are harrowing and sad, triumphant yet lonely, mesmerizing and horrific. In this page-turner, the sisterhood and traitors of the POW camp resonate off the page, with the added culinary delights and comfort foods of the afternoon teas of Changi Prison.


      The stories of what women contribute, suffer, and carry in wartime are rarely told. With original research and an elegant style, Evans allows us to see Ethel, to realize the price many women pay in conflicts, and to appreciate their resilience and grace. Such remarkable stories of Canadian women need to be told.

  • 4
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    Jeannie’s Demise Abortion on Trial in Victorian Toronto Ian Radforth Canada
    9781771135139 Paperback HISTORY / Women Publication Date:October 18, 2020
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.5 in | 308 gr | 198 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      August 1, 1875, Toronto: The naked body of a young woman is discovered in a pine box, half-buried in a ditch along Bloor Street. So begins Jeannie’s Demise, a real-life Victorian melodrama that played out in the bustling streets and courtrooms of “Toronto the Good,” cast with all the lurid stock characters of the genre. Historian Ian Radforth brings to life an era in which abortion was illegal, criminal proceedings were a spectator sport, and coded advertisements for back-alley procedures ran in the margins of newspapers.

      At the centre of the story is the elusive and doomed Jeannie Gilmour, a minister’s daughter whose independent spirit can only be glimpsed through secondhand accounts and courtroom reports. As rumours swirl about her final weeks and her abortionists stand trial for their lives, a riveted public grapples with questions of guilt and justice, innocence and intent. Radforth’s intensive research grounds the tragedy of Jeannie’s demise in sharp historical analysis, presenting over a dozen case studies of similar trials in Victorian-era Canada.

      Part gripping procedural, part meticulous autopsy, Jeannie’s Demise opens a rare window into the hidden history of a woman’s right to choose.

      Bio

      Ian Radforth is a Canadian social historian who taught for more than three decades in the department of history at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Bushworkers and Bosses: Logging in Northern Ontario, 1900–1980 and Royal Spectacle: The 1860 Visit of the Prince of Wales to Canada and the United States.

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  • 5
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    Being and Swine The End of Nature (As We Knew It) Fahim Amir, Geoffrey C. Howes Canada, Corvin Russell Canada
    9781771134811 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Essays Publication Date:December 01, 2020
    $24.95 CAD 5 x 7.25 x 0.59 in | 187 gr | 228 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Forget everything you think you know about nature. Fahim Amir’s award-winning book takes pure delight in posing unexpected questions: Are animals victims of human domination, or heroes of resistance? Is nature pristine and defenceless, or sentient and devious? Is being human really a prerequisite for being political?

      In a world where birds on Viagra punch above their weight and termites hijack the heating systems of major cities, animals can be recast as vigilantes, agitators, and public enemies in their own right. Under Amir’s magic spell, pigs transform from slaughterhouse innocents into rioting revolutionaries, pigeons from urban pests into unruly militants, honeybees from virtuous fuzzballs into shameless centrefold models for eco-capitalism. As paws, claws, talons, and hooves seize the means of production, Being and Swine spirals higher and higher into a heady thesis that becomes more convincing by the minute.

      At the heart of Amir’s writing is a deep optimism and bracingly fresh reading of Marxist, post-colonial, and feminist theory, building upon the radical scholarship of Donna J. Haraway and others. Contrarian, whip-smart, and wildly innovative, no other book will laugh at your convictions quite like this one.

      Bio

      Fahim Amir is a Viennese philosopher and author. He has taught at various universities and art academies in Europe and Latin America. His research explores the thresholds of nature, cultures and urbanism; performance and utopia; and colonial historicity and modernism.



      Geoffrey C. Howes has translated books by Peter Rosei, Robert Musil, Jürg Laederach, and Gabriele Petricek, as well as stories, essays, and poems by more than thirty authors.



      Corvin Russell is an activist, writer, and translator based in Toronto. His current focus is Indigenous solidarity and environmental justice work.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      “Amir challenges us—especially those of us on the left—to acknowledge the behaviour of animals as inherently political. Woven through the social, political, and economic theory are refreshing and often amusing vignettes of collaboration between animals and humans to resist state and colonial authority, as well as animals acting in the independent pursuit of pleasure, rebellion, and revenge.”


      “Amir reveals a world where animals are seen with different eyes—not the consumer gaze, laced with pity, indifference, and violence, but as equal resisting agents in the struggle. A promise of a future where pigs, and those of fur, fin, feather, and feelers, resist the machine of capitalist oppression. Fanciful? No. This beautiful book is a sorely needed reminder that human speciesism has cancelled other animals from the resistance, when they resisted all along.”


      “Free from typical boundaries of discipline or species, the freewheeling Being and Swine takes a novel jaunt through the history of thought and political philosophy: from Burke’s scaremongering against the ‘swinish multitude’ unleashed by democracy, to Engels’ famous struggle with the platypus, to the place of local pig-herding traditions in the development of the Frankfurt School. Being and Swine is filled with fertile polemics, witty detours, and swerves into burrows and sewers, pursuing unlikely bio-political insights that are sure to delight thinkers of any species.”


      “Settle into Being and Swine and follow Fahim Amir through city parks, slaughterhouses, skyscrapers, military areas, supermarkets, construction sites, and many other places where humans and other-than-humans meet. From pigeon to platypus, from pigs to sparrows, honeybees to termites, engage with ecological and political imagination and know that nothing is untouched, nothing is passive. How is it that so many progressives miss the teeming, toiling, wily, freedom-seeking work of those political agents known as ‘animals’? In this compelling, vibrant, and fascinating book, Amir offers answer and remedy as he describes animal actors, their acts of resistance to human power, and the lessons of such resistance.”


      “Amir’s discussion of the challenges and possibilities of human-animal politics is not only thought-provoking, engaging, and wide-ranging, it is urgently needed. Social justice requires but also must move beyond Homo sapiens—and this has never been clearer.”

  • 6
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    Leading Progress The Professional Institute of the Public Service Canada 1920–2020 Jason Russell Canada
    9781771134781 Paperback POLITICAL SCIENCE / Labor & Industrial Relations Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $34.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.62 in | 410 gr | 272 pages Carton Quantity:39 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      On February 6, 1920, a small group of public service employees met for the first time to form a professional association. A century later, the Professional Institute of the Public Service Canada (PIPSC) is a bargaining agent representing close to 60,000 public sector workers, whose collective efforts for the public good have touched the lives of every Canadian.

      Published on the centennial of PIPSC’s founding, Leading Progress is the definitive account of its evolution from then to now—and a rare glimpse into an under-studied corner of North American labour history. Researcher Dr. Jason Russell draws on a rich collection of sources, including archival material and oral history interviews with dozens of current and past PIPSC members. The story that unfolds is a complex one, filled with success and struggle, told with clarity and even-handedness.

      After decades of demographic and generational shifts, economic booms and busts, and political sea change, PIPSC looks toward its next hundred years with its mission as strong as ever: to advocate for social and economic justice that benefits all Canadians.

      Bio

      Dr. Jason Russell holds a PhD in history from York University and is an associate professor at SUNY Empire State College in Buffalo, New York. He is the author of Our Union: UAW/CAW Local 27 from 1950 to 1990 and Making Managers in Canada, 1945–1995: Companies, Community Colleges, and Universities. He is currently working on several forthcoming books on North American labour history.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Russell uses the oral histories to great effect....Leading Progress is an enjoyable read and important contribution that will be of interest not only to members of PIPSC, but also to those interested in organized labour and the public sector."


      “A clear, thorough study of a large, important group of Canadian public-sector workers—the professionals—who were historically cautious unionists more inclined to collaboration than confrontation, until neoliberal governments disrupted their working lives. Jason Russell has made excellent use of the substantial archival record, but even more impressively, he has woven in the voices of a large number of union members he interviewed. A useful addition to the shelf of modern labour history.”


      “Jason Russell’s stirring and comprehensive history of the first century of PIPSC’s innovative organizing among public professionals tells a marvellous story about the power of unionism—not just to lift the standards of work, but to build a stronger economy and society.”


      “The many characters, communities, and causes that Leading Progress captures accurately depict the heart and soul of all unions, past and present. With density now greatest in the public sector, the value of professional associations has never been more important.”


      “Public sector unions remain one of the most vital structures for the protection of workers’ rights, but they also underpin many important values of our democratic institutions, including independence, neutrality, the unbiased use of evidence, equal treatment, and inclusion. In this excellent history, Jason Russell reminds us that we cannot rely on politicians alone to protect the values of our democratic system, and PIPSC exists to defend not only their hard-won rights, but also the rights of all Canadians.”


      “In Leading Progress, Jason Russell has accomplished a rare feat. He has written a book that is at once an incisive overview of labour and working-class history, as well as a detailed institutional biography that vividly captures the birth and transformation of the PIPSC from one of reluctant unionism to being at the centre of many of today’s most pressing struggles for social and economic justice.”


      “In a crisis, the value of Canada’s professional public service is suddenly obvious to everyone. But in “normal” times, whether they know it or not, Canadians owe a debt of gratitude to the dedicated men and women who ensure the safety of our food and the health of our environment. I’m delighted we now have a rich history of PIPSC’s remarkable story.”


      Leading Progress fills an important gap in labour studies literature, as it considers public employees and professionals, two constituencies whose unions are often understudied. By looking at the history of PIPSC inside and out, it gives a voice to many staff, leaders, and members of the organization through extensive interviews, showing that a union is not only a structure but also the reflection of workers’ identities and the ways they relate to their jobs as well as their communities.”


      Leading Progress, given the COVID-19 crisis, is a timely reminder of the profound importance of having and maintaining a professional public service. This is a history of a union and more. Important questions of capacity, professional autonomy, and democratization of administration are raised throughout—and, crucially, the relationship of professional workers to the state as employer and the broader labour movement and working class.”


      Leading Progress is an illuminating, comprehensive, and candid history of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada. Jason Russell’s account of how PIPSC continually balanced its goals of representing professional public servants and non-partisanship—even as it became a sophisticated union increasingly engaging in advocacy, defending expertise and scientific expertise, and responding to the needs of the many professional groups it represents—is alone worth the read.”

  • 7
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    À L’avant-garde du progrès L’Institut professionnel de la fonction publique du Canada 1920–2020 Jason Russell Canada, Hélène Poulin Canada
    9781771135160 Paperback POLITICAL SCIENCE / Labor & Industrial Relations Publication Date:October 31, 2020
    $34.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.62 in | 536 gr | 306 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Le 6 février 1920, un petit groupe d’employés de la fonction publique se réunit pour la première fois afin de former une association professionnelle. Un siècle plus tard, l’Institut professionnel de la fonction publique du Canada (IPFPC) est un agent négociateur représentant près de 60 000 travailleurs du secteur public dont les efforts pour le bien collectif améliorent la vie de chaque Canadien.

      Publié à l’occasion du 100e anniversaire de fondation de l’IPFPC, À l’avant-garde du progrès dresse le portrait complet de son évolution, de 1920 à aujourd’hui, et lève le voile sur un pan souvent négligé de l’histoire syndicale nord-américaine. L’auteur, Jason Russell, s’appuie sur une abondante collection de sources, dont des documents d’archives et des témoignages de dizaines de membres actuels et passés de l’IPFPC. Marquée par des réussites et semée d’embûches, l’histoire est complexe et racontée avec clarté et modération.

      Après des décennies de changements démographiques et générationnels, de booms et de crises économiques et de bouleversements politiques, les membres de l’IPFPC entament les cent prochaines années guidés par la même mission importante que celle qui les a inspirés jusqu’à présent : militer pour une justice sociale et économique pour le bien de tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes.

      Bio

      Dr. Jason Russell holds a PhD in history from York University and is an associate professor at SUNY Empire State College in Buffalo, New York. He is the author of Our Union: UAW/CAW Local 27 from 1950 to 1990 and Making Managers in Canada, 1945–1995: Companies, Community Colleges, and Universities. He is currently working on several forthcoming books on North American labour history.



      Hélène Poulin

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      « En temps de crise, la valeur de la fonction publique professionnelle du Canada est soudain évidente pour tout le monde. Mais en temps “normal”, qu’ils le sachent ou non, les Canadiens sont redevables aux femmes et aux hommes dévoués qui assurent la salubrité de nos aliments et la protection de notre environnement. Je suis très heureux que l’histoire riche et remarquable de l’IPFPC nous soit maintenant racontée. »


      « Dans le contexte de la crise de la COVID-19, À l’avant-garde du progrès arrive à point nommé pour nous rappeler toute l’importance d’avoir et de maintenir une fonction publique professionnelle. Cette histoire, c’est plus que celle d’un syndicat. D’importantes questions sur la capacité, l’autonomie professionnelle et la démocratisation de l’administration sont soulevées tout au long de l’ouvrage, et l’auteur s’attache tout particulièrement aux relations des travailleurs professionnels avec l’État-employeur, le mouvement syndical et la classe ouvrière au sens large. »


      « Les nombreuses personnalités, communautés et causes mentionnées dans À l’avant-garde du progrès dressent un portrait saisissant du cœur même de tous les syndicats, passés et présents. Puisque la densité syndicale la plus élevée se trouve désormais dans le secteur public, la valeur des associations professionnelles n’a jamais été aussi importante. »

  • 8
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    9781771337892 Paperback FICTION / Indigenous Publication Date:October 30, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.69 in | 350 gr | 240 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Finalist for the 2021 Rasmussen & Co. Indigenous Peoples' Writing Award

      The Narrows of Fear (Wapawikoscikanik) weaves the stories of a group of women committed to helping one another. Despite abuse experienced by some, both in their own community and in residential schools, these women learn to celebrate their culture, its stories, its dancing, its drums, and its elders. Principal of these elders is Nina, the advisor at the women's shelter. With the help of Sandy and Charlene, Nina uses Indigenous practices to heal the traumatized Mary Ann. This is a powerful novel&151;sometimes brutally violent, sometimes healing, sometimes mythical, and always deeply respectful of the Indigenous culture at its heart.

      Bio

      Carol Rose GoldenEagle is Cree and Dene with roots in Sandy Bay, northern Saskatchewan. She is an award-winning published novelist, poet, playwright, visual artist, and musician. Her works has previously been published using the surname, Daniels. She now chooses to use her traditional name. She is the author of the award-winning novel Bearskin Diary (2015) and the recently published Bone Black (2019). Her debut poetry volume, Hiraeth, was published in 2018 and was shortlisted for the 2019 Saskatchewan Book Awards. As a visual artist, her work has been exhibited in art galleries across Saskatchewan and Northern Canada. As a musician, a CD of women's drum songs, in which Carol is featured, was recently nominated for a Prairie Music Award. Before pursuing her art on a full-time basis, Carol worked as a journalist for more than 30 years in television and radio at APTN, CTV, and CBC. She lives in Regina Beach, Saskatchewan.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Rasmussen & Co. Indigenous Peoples' Writing Award 2021, Short-listed
      Reviews

      "Strong women united in friendship and solidarity are an unstoppable force. These characters will stay with you. This story is haunting in all the good ways."
      -Katherena Vermette, author of The Break

      "Even though fiction, Narrows of Fear (Wapawikoscikanik) is an authentic telling of Truth as its characters wrestle with the trauma of inter-generational violence and abuse rooted in the colonization of Indigenous peoples. It is also an honouring of language, of culture, of dreams, and of Spirit. A story of courage, of hope and healing, it is a welcome addition to the widening and strengthening of Circle for all. Hiy Hiy Osawa Mikisew Iskwew."
      -Lorrie Potvin, author of First Gear: A Motorcycle Memoir, and the forthcoming, Horses in the Sand

      "Carol Rose GoldenEagle's novel, The Narrows of Fear (Wapawikoscikanik) is a powerful and compelling novel about Aboriginal women reclaiming and celebrating our Indigenous culture, traditions, and ways of knowing. Collective knowledge can heal and strengthen humanity when women are given space to do so. A must read for all women!"
      -Beverly Little Thunder, author of One Bead at a Time: A Memoir

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    The Rage Room Lisa De Nikolits Canada
    9781771337779 Paperback FICTION / Science Fiction Publication Date:October 30, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.8 in | 350 gr | 312 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      What if you made the worst mistake of your life and got the chance to fix it? Only you made it so much worse? From the incomparable crafter of nine cross-genre works of fiction, Lisa deNikolits expands her horizons to pen a grab-you-by-the-throat, feminist speculative-fiction thriller in the style of Groundhog Day meets The Matrix.

      The perfect father kills his family on Christmas Eve, and tries to undo his actions by jumping back in time. The result is murder and mayhem in dystopia. Set in 2055, the world is run by robots and virtual data, while the weather is controlled by satellite dishes. Arts and culture are no more than distant memories. People are angry, placated by prescribed visits to rage rooms to vent their boredom, fury, and discontent. Beneath the sunny skies and behind the garbage-free suburban McMansions live deeply disturbed, materialistic families.

      During his time travels and increasingly desperate attempts to reserve his colossal mistake, Sharps Barkley meets the leader of the Eden Collective, a feminist army determined tosave the Earth by removing all artificial intelligence and letting the Earth restore itself--if necessary, at the expense of mankind. The Eden Collective uses data gathered from the rage rooms to analyze and predict the potential and actions needed for the Earth to reset andthey need to prove that time travel is an effective tool. If Sharps can go back and save his children, then there is hope for the future. Sharps is the 49th experiment and his success is pivotal. Can love prevail over anger?

      The Rage Room has a multi-layered plot that is fueled by a feminist-driven courage to take charge and save the world as it exposes the effects of an increasingly digital age on our lives and, ultimately, our humanity.

      Bio

      Originally from South Africa, Lisa de Nikolits is an award-winning author whose work has appeared on recommended reading lists for both Open Book Toronto and the 49th Shelf, as well as being chosen as a Chatelaine Editor's Pick and a Canadian Living Magazine Must Read. She has published nine novels that most recently include: No Fury Like That (published in Italian under the title Una furia dell'altro mondo); Rotten Peaches and The Occult Persusasion and the Anarchist's Solution. Lisa lives and writes in Toronto and is a member of the Sisters in Crime, Toronto Chapter; Sisters in Crime; Mesdames of Mayhem; and The International Thriller Writers.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "In her latest captivating book, Lisa de Nikolits proffers not only a roller coaster of entertainment, but also, sharp political commentary in complicated times. The Rage Room is an intricately woven dystopian world, rich in strong female characters who easily whisk readers to a world of futuristic follies. Move over George Orwell--De Nikolits shows us how the future can be scary, exciting, and above all, female."
      --Kelly S. Thompson, national bestselling author of Girls Need Not Apply: Field Notes from the Forces

      "If dystopian speculative fiction is your thing, with the enticement of time travel, you won't go wrong with The Rage Room. The world de Nikolits has built is utterly fascinating, and quite horrific, yet believable. I sympathized with the main character, even though he is flawed, but that makes the story even more interesting. What a ride! The plot ratchets up like a train speeding down the tracks out of control. Gripping tension, and at the same time, highly complex, with multiple time travel redos and memories overlapping. I found that fascinating. I was absolutely riveted, and pleased to see that it ends with the hint of more books to come."
      --Melodie Campbell, award-winning author of The Goddaughter series

      "We've all wanted to go back to the past to fix the future - but Sharps has messed things up so much in his own high- tech future-world that he has to do it. Lisa de Nikolits takes us - and him - on a wild, high-octane ride into other times and places so bizarre, blighted, funny and wise that they just might seem chillingly familiar. She turns time travel on its proverbial ear and you won't want to get out of the passenger seat until the last page."
      --Catherine Dunphy, author of Morgentaler, A Difficult Hero

      "Why would one go back in time? To make things right, of course. But every time Sharps visits his past, things change in ways he can't control, and he keeps changing from a worrier to a warrior. I loved all the witty characters, and original, daring twists in this genuine reality fiction beyond imagination!"
      --Suzana Tratnik, author of Games with Greta

      "Dark, fun, weird, imaginative, The Rage Room is a dystopic ride perfect for the anxieties and conditions of the present day. The paranoia of Sharps Barkley seeps into you, propelling this thriller that will keep you guessing to the very end."
      --David Albertyn, author of Undercard

      "With The Rage Room, Lisa de Nikolits takes a deep dive into dystopia. Prepare to be alternately chilled and thrilled as the hapless hero journeys backwards and forwards in time in his increasingly desperate attempts to right his terrible wrongs, and to find some sense in his rapidly disintegrating world."
      -- Lorna Poplak, author of Drop Dead: A Horrible History of Hanging in Canada

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    9781771338059 Paperback FICTION / Disabilities & Special Needs Publication Date:November 19, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.69 in | 300 gr | 260 pages Carton Quantity:52 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Winner, 2021 IPPY Bronze Medal for Canada-East Best Regional Fiction.

      Precocious ten-year-old Vanessa Dudley-Morris knows lots of secrets. In 1949 when she and her family are forced to move into two rooms on the second floor of 519 Jarvis Street in Toronto, a genteel but somewhat rundown rooming house owned by a reclusive pianist, she learns a lot more.

      Despite the family's drastically reduced circumstances, her parents struggle to keep up their old standards. Threatened by blindness due to an eye condition, Vanessa is kept at home, tutored by an erratic succession of eccentrics, some with questionable credentials. Consequently, she spends a lot of time alone, wandering the dim corridors of the old house, silently listening at doors and watching the odd characters who live there. She becomes fascinated by a mother and son who move into a room on the third floor. Eventually she agrees to take secret notes from the son to his mysterious friend at her church, unwittingly unleashing a chain of events that leads to tragedy.

      Bio

      Caro Soles's novels include mysteries, erotica, gay lit, science fiction and the occasional bit of dark fantasy. She received the Derrick Murdoch Award from the Crime Writers of Canada, and has been short-listed for the Lambda Literary Award, the Aurora Award, and the Stoker Award. Caro lives in Toronto, loves dachshunds, books, opera and ballet, not necessarily in that order.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      IPPY Awards Bronze Medal - Canada-East - Best Regional Fiction 2021, Winner
      Reviews

      "Caro Soles's book is an extraordinary piece of fiction. Haunting, and highly evocative, it deserves to find its place in the pantheon of the best of Canadian Literature."
      -Maureen Jennngs, Award winning author of the Murdock Mysteries and several other series

      "Author Caro Soles takes us on a captivating trip through late-1940s Toronto, its afternoon teas and general propriety, revealing a story rich in character and local colour. Our guide is young Vanessa, whose astute observations of her genteel family and the oddball tenants of a downtown rooming house keep the pages turning with hints of calamity to come. Great (and often witty) writing, love of music and a wonderful sense of time and place mark this enjoyable novel."
      -Carole Giangrande, author of The Tender Birds and All That Is Solid Melts Into Air

      "Quirky, funny and haunting."
      -Linwood Barclay, NYT bestselling author

      "Intimate, evocative and memorable, Caro Soles's Dancing with Chairs in the Music House holds the reader spellbound from its opening sentence-It's 1949, a brand new year, and we're moving. Again.-to its heart-stopping conclusion. Vanessa Dudley-Morris, the novel's engaging ten-year-old narrator, kept from school by an eye condition that threatens blindness, is free to roam her new home, a rundown rooming house at 519 Jarvis Street. Vanessa is a keen observer of her world and through her, Soles gives us accurate and incisive portraits of Toronto and her citizens at mid-twentieth century. Remembering the way we were then is a gift, but the greatest gift in Soles's novel is her characterization of Vanessa. Like Henry James, Caro Soles is able to capture in words the experience of what it feels like to be growing inside."
      -Gail Bowen, award-winning author of the Joanne Kilbourne Series

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