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#BLM: Black Voices & Anti-Racism Resources

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  • 1
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    Beatdown Three Plays Joseph Jomo Pierre Canada
    9780887548383 Paperback DRAMA / Canadian Publication Date:July 01, 2006
    $17.95 CAD 6 x 8.93 x 0.28 in | 180 gr | 104 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Playwrights Canada Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Joseph Jomo Pierre's world is one of fatherless children, where boys turn to drugs and guns while girls turn to motherhood at the blink of an eye, where the colour of your skin dictates the course your life will take, where your brothers are as likely to pull you back down, as to help you get up.

      Includes:

      Born Ready a. k.a. Black on Both Side
      BeatDown a. k.a. Life
      Pusha-Man a. k.a. The Seed

      Bio

      Playwright and actor Joseph Jomo Pierre was born in Trinidad, and raised in Scarborough, Canada where he completed a BFA in acting at York University. He is the author of Shakespeare’s Nigga, a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for drama, as well as Beatdown: Three Plays, which includes Born Ready, BeatDown, and Pusha-Man. He lives in Toronto.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "…an important new playwright, Joseph Jomo Pierre. He explores the young urban black experience with a keen ear and a strong sense of theatricality."

  • 2
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    Series: Semaphore
    BlackLife Post-BLM and the Struggle for Freedom Rinaldo Walcott Canada, Idil Abdillahi Canada
    9781927886212 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies Publication Date:June 01, 2019
    $15.00 CAD 5 x 6.9 x 0.4 in | 120 gr | 104 pages Carton Quantity:100 Canadian Rights: Y ARP Books
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      Description
      What does it mean in the era of Black Lives Matter to continue to ignore and deny the violence that is the foundation of the Canadian nation state? BlackLife discloses the ongoing destruction of Black people as enacted not simply by state structures, but beneath them in the foundational modernist ideology that underlies thinking around migration and movement, as Black erasure and death are unveiled as horrifically acceptable throughout western culture. With exactitude and celerity, Idil Abdillahi and Rinaldo Walcott pull from local history, literature, theory, music, and public policy around everything from arts funding, to crime and mental health--presenting a convincing call to challenge pervasive thought on dominant culture's conception of Black personhood. They argue that artists, theorists, activists, and scholars offer us the opportunity to rethink and expose flawed thought, providing us new avenues into potential new lives and a more livable reality of BlackLife.
      Bio
      Professor Rinaldo Walcott is the Director of the Women & Gender Studies Institute. Rinaldo's research is founded in a philosophical orientation that is concerned with the ways in which coloniality shapes human relations across social and cultural time and focuses on Black cultural politics; histories of colonialism in the Americas, multiculturalism, citizenship, and diaspora; gender and sexuality; and social, cultural and public policy.

      Idil Abdillahi is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Ryerson University. As a critical interdisciplinary scholar, she has published on a wide array of topics such as: mental health, policing, poverty, HIV/AIDS, organizational development, and several other key policy areas at the intersection of BlackLife and state interruption. Most notably, Idil's cutting-edge research on Blackened madness and anti-Black sanism has informed the current debates on fatal police shootings of Black mad identified people.
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  • 3
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    Blank Interviews and Essays M. NourbeSe Philip Canada
    9781771663069 Paperback LITERARY CRITICISM / Canadian Publication Date:May 31, 2017
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.8 in | 540 gr | 348 pages Carton Quantity:22 Canadian Rights: Y BookThug
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      Description
      Blank is a collection of previously out-of-print essays and new works by one of Canada's most important writers and thinkers.

      Through an engagement with her earlier work, M. NourbeSe Philip comes to realize the existence of a repetition in the world: the return of something that, while still present, has become unembedded from the world, disappeared. Her imperative becomes to make us see what has gone unseen by writing memory upon the margin of history, in the shadow of empire and at the frontier of silence.

      In heretical writings that work to make the disappeared perceptible, Blank explores questions of timeliness, recurrence, ongoingness, art, race, the body politic, and the so-called multicultural nation. Through these considerations, Philip creates a linguistic form that registers the presence of what has seemingly dissolved, a form that also imprints the loss and the silence surrounding those disappearances in its very presence.

      Praise for M. NourbeSe Philip:

      “Philip’s questions are difficult, and of an intensity of insistence rarely achieved.”—Erin Mouré

      “Those still confused about why poetry might fracture and splinter and
      stutter can find an answer in the work of M. NourbeSe Philip.” —Juliana Spahr
      Bio

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  • 4
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    Canada's Forgotten Slaves Two Centuries of Bondage Marcel Trudel Canada, George Tombs
    9781550653274 Paperback HISTORY / Canada Publication Date:September 15, 2013
    $27.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0 in | 0.5 lb | 398 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Vehicule Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Canada's Forgotten Slaves is a ground-breaking work by one of French Canada's leading historians, available for the first time in English. This book reveals that slavery was not just something that happened in the United States. Quite the contrary! Slavery was very much a part of everyday life in colonial Canada under the French regime starting in 1629, and then under the British regime right up to its official abolition throughout the British empire in 1834.

      By painstakingly combing through unpublished archival records of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Marcel Trudel gives a human face to the over 4,000 Aboriginal and Black slaves bought, sold and exploited in colonial Canada. He reveals the identities of the slave owners, who ranged from governors, seigneurs, and military officers to bishops, priests, nuns, judges, and merchants. Trudel describes the plight of slaves--the joys and sorrows of their daily existence. Trudel also recounts how some slaves struggled to gain their liberty. He documents Canadian politicians, historians and ecclesiastics who deliberately falsified the record, glorifying their own colonial-era heroes, in order to remove any trace of the thousands of Aboriginal and Black slaves held in bondage for two centuries in Canada.
      Bio
      Marcel Trudel was an eminent Canadian historian and a respected authority on the history of New France. A fervent advocate of the secular society, he was blacklisted by the Catholic Church from teaching at Laval University in the early 1960s, then taught for several decades at the University of Ottawa. He was an award-winning author of more than 40 books, many of them translated into other languages. Trudel died in 2011.
      George Tombs is a Montreal-based author, film-maker, award-winning journalist and translator.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "This book provides the only available outline of the contours of the slave system ... in seventeenth and eighteenth-century New France." -Canadian Historical Review

      "A major and controversial work." -Le Devoir
  • 5
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    Canticles I (MMXVI) George Elliott Clarke Canada
    9781550719123 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:August 01, 2016
    $25.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 1.04 in | 664 gr | 500 pages Carton Quantity:18 Canadian Rights: Y Guernica Editions
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Book I of The Canticles puts into dialogue -- as dramatic monologues -- those who fostered the transatlantic slave trade, or who demonized the image of the Negro in the Occident; as well as those who struggled for liberation and/or anti-racism. In this work, Dante can critique Christopher Columbus and Frederick Douglass can upbraid Abraham Lincoln; Elizabeth Barrett Browning can muse on her African racial heritage and its implications for child-bearing, while Karl Marx can excoriate Queen Victoria. Book II will focus on Black folk readings of Scripture, Hebrew and Greek, with a few other religious texts canvassed too. Book III will narrate the rise of the African Baptist Association of Nova Scotia.

      Bio

      Acclaimed for his narrative lyric suites (Whylah Falls and Execution Poems), his lyric “colouring books” (Blue, Black, Red, and Gold), his selected poems (Blues and Bliss), his opera libretti and plays (Beatrice Chancy and Trudeau: Long March, Shining Path), George Elliott Clarke now presents us with his epic-in-progress, Canticles, a work that views History as a web of imperialism, enslavement, and insurrection. A native Africadian, Canada’s 7th Parliamentary Poet Laureate ranges the atlas and ransacks the library to ink lines unflinching before Atrocity and unquiet before Oppression.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Canticles is George Elliott Clarke’s most textured work to date. Like Virgil guiding Dante, Clarke guides us deep into the dark echo chamber of history where he remixes an epic catalogue of multicultural voices from Hannibal to Harriet “Moses” Tubman. Weaving these voices together, like bards of yesteryear churning raw material into epic song, Clarke plays the role of a chameleon poet inking a brutal lyricism onto the page. These canticles abound with polyphony: Clarke echoes slave and imperialist debates that stretch back to Cleopatra, provides new voice to Marie-Josèphe Angélique and Phillis Wheatley, and revises and reworks history with the powers of a firebrand poet in full control of his craft. As spirited and incendiary as Ezra Pound’s querulous Cantos, Canticles is a manifesto that tells us—howling, screeching, testifying, rhyming—that poetry makes things happen, and that it has as much to tell us as ever.

  • 6
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    Canticles I (MMXVII) George Elliott Clarke Canada
    9781771831901 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:March 01, 2017
    $25.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 1 in | 668 gr | 450 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y Guernica Editions
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The second part of Book I of Canticles continues the dialogue -- as dramatic monologues -- of those who fostered the transatlantic slave trade, or who demonized the image of the Negro in the Occident; as well as those who struggled for liberation and/or anti-racism. In this work, Dante can critique Christopher Columbus and Frederick Douglass can upbraid Abraham Lincoln; Elizabeth Barrett Browning can muse on her African racial heritage and its implications for child-bearing, while Karl Marx can excoriate Queen Victoria.

      Bio

      Acclaimed for his narrative lyric suites (Whylah Falls and Execution Poems), his lyric “colouring books” (Blue, Black, Red, and Gold), his selected poems (Blues and Bliss), his opera libretti and plays (Beatrice Chancy and Trudeau: Long March, Shining Path), George Elliott Clarke now presents us with his epic-in-progress, Canticles, a work that views History as a web of imperialism, enslavement, and insurrection. A native Africadian, Canada’s 7th Parliamentary Poet Laureate ranges the atlas and ransacks the library to ink lines unflinching before Atrocity and unquiet before Oppression.

      Marketing & Promotion
  • 7
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    Canticles II (MMXIX) George Elliott Clarke Canada
    9781771834094 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:October 01, 2019
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1.3 in | 760 gr | 400 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Guernica Editions
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Canticles II continues George Elliott Clarke's epic exploration of the Black/African intellectual presence in the Occident. In Canticles I (MMXVI) and (MMXVII), Clarke presents dramatic monologues in which historical personages and invented characters address 2000 years of imperialism and 500 years of slavery, some in support and others in opposition. In <Canticles II, Clarke revises influential scriptures, principally Judeo-Christian, to offer alternative takes and tangents on their narratives and aphorisms, their histories and prophecies, reflecting an Afrocentric accent. Canticles II (MMXIX) shadows selected, Hebraic texts to draft a God who is particularly headstrong and peoples who tend to be wrong-headed. Any suspected blasphemy herein is, however, merely Poetry in disguise.

      Bio

      Acclaimed for his narrative lyric suites (Whylah Falls and Execution Poems), his lyric “colouring books” (Blue, Black, Red, and Gold), his selected poems (Blues and Bliss), his opera libretti and plays (Beatrice Chancy and Trudeau: Long March, Shining Path), George Elliott Clarke now presents us with his epic-in-progress, Canticles, a work that views History as a web of imperialism, enslavement, and insurrection. A native Africadian, Canada’s 7th Parliamentary Poet Laureate ranges the atlas and ransacks the library to ink lines unflinching before Atrocity and unquiet before Oppression.

      Marketing & Promotion
  • 8
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    Dear Current Occupant A Memoir Chelene Knight Canada
    9781771663908 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date:March 01, 2018
    $20.00 CAD 5.8 x 7.9 x 0.5 in | 180 gr | 120 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Winner of the 2018 City of Vancouver Book Award

      From Vancouver-based writer Chelene Knight, Dear Current Occupant is a creative non-fiction memoir about home and belonging set in the 80s and 90s of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.

      Using a variety of forms, Knight reflects on her childhood through a series of letters addressed to all of the current occupants now living in the twenty different houses she moved in and out of with her mother and brother. From blurry non-chronological memories of trying to fit in with her own family as the only mixed East Indian/Black child, to crystal clear recollections of parental drug use, Knight draws a vivid portrait of memory that still longs for a place and a home.

      Peering through windows and doors into intimate, remembered spaces now occupied by strangers, Knight writes to them in order to deconstruct her own past. From the rubble of memory she then builds a real place in order to bring herself back home.

      Bio
      Chelene Knight was born in Vancouver, and is currently the Managing Editor of Room Magazine. A graduate of The Writers' Studio at SFU, Chelene has been published in various Canadian and American literary magazines. Her debut book, Braided Skin, was published in 2015. Dear Current Occupant is her second book. Chelene is also working on a historical novel set in the 1930's and 40's in Vancouver's Hogan's Alley.
      Marketing & Promotion
        Planned launches and readings in Vancouver, Victoria, and Toronto.
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      City of Vancouver Book Award 2018, Winner
      Reviews
      “Knight+is a poet at heart, somewhat disinclined to follow the dusty rules of prose writing, and we are all richer for it. This memoir is built from shards of pure resilience, expertly pieced together into a compelling—and at times devastating—chronicle of youth, family, and
      sense of place. From Clark Drive to Commercial and Broadway, Dear Current Occupant
      is a love song to East Vancouver—it is a map of scars, and as everyone knows, scars make for good storytelling.” —Carleigh Baker, author of Bad Endings, finalist for the 2018 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize

      Dear Current Occupant is an astonishing book: haunting, intimate, and deeply rendered. A lyrical memoir set against the backdrop of Vancouver’ gritty East Side, it triumphantly melds together prose, poetry, letters and imagery, to illuminate the pain of un-belonging, the search for a home, and the power of words to heal and transform us. It is a book that boldly takes risks, unafraid and brimming with raw energy, tenderness, and heartbreaking beauty. Chelene Knight emerges as a fierce new voice in Canadian literature, deserving of our full attention.” —Ayelet Tsabari, author of The Best Place on Earth

      “I want to thank Chelene Knight for not forcing her memoir into a point “a” to b” narrative. Too often complex and stigmatized stories are dumbed-down, but Knight elevates! She uplifts both her her experiences and the poetic prose and hybrid forms used to share these experiences. Dear Current Occupant will surely become a nuanced creative touchstone that shows us how our
      stories of survival can and should be told.” —Amber Dawn, author of Sub Rosa and How Poetry Saved My Life: A Hustler’s Memoir


  • 9
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    Exile Blues Douglas Gary Joseph Freeman
    9781771862004 Paperback FICTION / African American & Black On Sale Date:November 01, 2019
    $24.95 CAD 152.4 x 228.6 x 20.32 mm | 1.02 lb | 380 pages Carton Quantity:32 Baraka Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      When Preston Downs, Jr., alias Prez, slides down the emergency chute onto the frozen tarmac at the Montreal airport, little does he know that returning home to Washington D.C. or to his adopted city, Chicago, would now be impossible. Events had sped by after a dust-up with the Chicago police. With a new name and papers, he finds himself in a foreign city where people speak French and life is douce compared to the one he fled. Son of a World War II vet, Prez grows up in the 50s in D.C., a segregated Southern city, and learns early that black lives don’t much matter. As a leader in the streets, his journey from boyhood to manhood means acquiring fighting skills to lead and unify long before losing his virginity. Smart and skeptical, but with a code of ethics, he, like every black kid, wants to be Malcolm, Martin or at least a “soul brother,” which inspires fear among the powers that be. Spotted while an A student at Howard University in 1964, Prez is invited to do an interdisciplinary course with field work on Civil Rights in Chicago, a city as divided as Gettysburg was a hundred years earlier. Faced with police-state conditions, dubious armed gangs, spies and provocateurs, Prez and the young women and men he works with are propelled into a head-on fight with police. James Baldwin wrote that the blues began "on the auction block," others say it started with their kidnapping from Africa. Prez was born in exile, with the blues. Only someone who has lived through that period can write an enthralling and passionate story like Exile Blues. Gary Freeman has done so with insight and sensitivity.
      Bio
      Douglas Gary Joseph Freeman is an African American now living in Canada. First-born child of Joseph Pannell Sr., a WWII Naval veteran, and Pauline Adams whose grandmother was born into slavery, he grew up in Washington, D.C., a segregated city know for police brutality. As a high school student he became involved in the Civil Rights movement and then at Howard University turned to Revolutionary Black Nationalism. Frederick Douglass was his first hero, but Malcolm X and Martin Luther King forged his ideological development and political activism, which led him to Chicago where he worked with a local South Side African American organization. Targeted by Chicago’s Red Squad for elimination, he had to fight for his life on a South Side street. The gun-battle that ensued left an officer wounded and the author wounded and in prison. The author began a long quest for justice which weathered repeated and renewed threats to his life. He fled to Canada “illegally” and became Douglas Gary Joseph Freeman. Married with four children, he worked chiefly as a library professional He was arrested on July 27, 2004 on an extradition warrant. After an 11-year successful struggle for justice, he was returned home to Canada in January 2015.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “Once all monarchies and then-or-now fascistic states, the European-Caucasian-majority duchies claim to be God’s chosen, egalitarian democracies. Yet, to be born black (or Turtle Island Indigenous) in any of these republics or constitutional monarchies is to be born, exiled from true citizenship. That’s the thesis of this gripping, true-to-life novel. Detailing genocidal police warfare against black youths and men in Washington, D.C. (a.k.a. 'Dixie'), and Chicago, Exile Blues is also the coming-of-age story of Preston Downs, Jr., 'Prez,' whose nickname highlights his slick, executive-privilege style of analysis, fisticuffs, and romance. Prez 'out-clevers' the paleface, ghoulish, guns-always-drawn racism of the U.S. capital, and slips the homicidal grasp of Chicago’s KKK-like cops, to escape to Montréal ('P.Q.'—back then, not yet 'QC'). But 1969 Montréal is in revolutionary ferment, and Prez finds himself navigating a maze of Black Panthers, Algerian nationalists, and FLQ radicals, all while trying to stabilize his love-life. Exile Blues is as cinematic, fast-paced, and action-packed as a classic, Blaxploitation flick. It’s the novel Malcolm X might have written had he not suffered martyrdom.” — George Elliott Clarke, Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate (2016-17), author of George & Rue

      "Exile Blues is fictionalized autobiography at its best. It is a novel but the central facts detail the author’s actual experiences of police racism in Washington D.C. and Chicago in the 1950’s and the 1960’s and his flight to Montreal to avoid prosecution. Freeman ('Prez' in the book) utilizes the freedom of a novel to re-create scenes that provide deeper understanding and have greater impact than would be possible in an autobiography. Exile Blues is a very engrossing book that gives fascinating insights into life in black ghettos in the United States" — Peter Rosenthal, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Toronto and retired lawyer

      "Exile Blues could be one of the most important Black History novels to appear in recent years."—James Fisher, The Miramichi Reader

      "To read Exile Blues is to step into the US of the 50s and 60s, to engage with African-American youth at the frontlines of fighting and protesting for freedom and equal rights... an engaging and multi-faceted narrative of survival and strength."—Terese Mason Pierre, Quill & Quire

      "Born Joseph Pannell in Washington, D.C., Freeman grew up in the early years of the American civil rights struggle. While working in Chicago’s South Side in the 1960s, he became part of that struggle, an outspoken activist targeted by the Red Squad, a division of the Chicago police department. He fled the United States in 1969, after shooting a police officer in self defence, thinking he would never be able to return. He eventually settled in Toronto, where he married, raised a family, and worked as a librarian. (We should take a moment here to appreciate the significance of the name he adopted during this exile.) He was arrested in 2004 outside the Toronto Reference Library on Yonge Street, and was held without bail for four years as he fought extradition. Eventually agreeing to face charges in the United States — for which he was exonerated — he then spent seven years trapped in the U.S. as he fought for re-entry to Canada. He was eventually allowed to return from this new exile in 2015. Freeman’s new book, Exile Blues, delineates the roots of those exiles, and documents the gradual understanding of the nature of race relations in the United States. Framed as a novel, one will find oneself unavoidably reading the book as a pseudo-memoir. Or, perhaps better, a spiritual autobiography. Exile Blues begins with Preston Downs Junior’s arrival in icy Montreal in the winter of 1968. He is taken in by a community of dissidents and revolutionaries, and begins to build a life in exile. When a figure from his past appears, however, readers are taken on a journey through his early years, his childhood, the loss of his father and friends, his growing awareness of the world around him and his place within it. And, most crucially, what he believes he must do to change that world. The framing sequences in Montreal are beautifully wrought, and brought to vivid life. As one might expect, the substantial flashbacks to his earlier life are handled differently, with a broad approach which, ultimately, suggests a foundational mythology, the recounted life as origin story. The disconnect between these approaches is occasionally frustrating, but Exile Blues quickly becomes a compelling read. More significantly, it has the air of an important read, a vivid exploration of an era which continues to shape not only individuals like Freeman, but an entire culture, one which — as Pannell has demonstrated — easily transcends borders." —Robert Wiersema, The Toronto Star

      “exceptional and moving… (Freeman) writes with passion about fighting injustice in U.S.A. and his struggle to find peace and security in Canada.”—Richard King, CBC (Montreal)
  • 10
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    Descent into Night Edem Awumey Canada, Phyllis Aronoff, Howard Scott
    9781988449166 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:November 10, 2017
    $20.95 CAD 5.7 x 8.7 x 0.6 in | 240 gr | 160 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Mawenzi House Publishers Ltd.
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      WINNER - Governor General's Literary Award for Translation Translated from French by Phyllis Aronoff and Howard Scott. From Goncourt Prize finalist a beautiful and brilliant new novel. With a nod to Samuel Beckett and Bohumil Hrabal, a young dramatist from a West African nation describes a student protest against a brutal oligarchy and its crushing aftermath. While distributing leaflets with provocative quotations from Beckett, Ito Baraka is taken to a camp where torture, starvation, beatings, and rape are normal. Forced to inform on his friends, whose fates he now fears, and released a broken man, he is enabled to escape to Quebec. His one goal is to tell the story of the protest and pay homage to Koli Lem, a teacher, cellmate, and lover of books, who was blinded by being forced to look at the sun--and is surely a symbol of the nation. Edem Awumey gives us a darkly moving and terrifying novel about fear and play, repression and protest, and the indomitable nature of creativity.
      Bio
      Edem Awumey was born in Lomé, Togo. He is the author of three previous novels, Port-Melo (2006), which won the prestigious Grand prix littéraire d?Afrique noire; Les pieds sales (2009), which was a finalist for the Prix Goncourt in France; and Rose déluge (2011). The English translation of Les pieds sales, Dirty Feet (2011), was selected for the Dublin Impac Award. In 2006 Awumey was selected to be a literary protégé to the renowned Moroccan writer Tahar Ben Jelloun. Edem Awumey currently lives in Gatineau, Quebec.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      "Artfully constructed, peppered with evocative phrasing, and skillfully translated, this beautiful volume is upsetting, poignant, and at times harrowing." --Publishers Weekly, starred review "Descent into Night, translated by Phyllis Aronoff and Howard Scott, is a beautifully assured rendering of a text offering many translation challenges. The translators agilely follow the text as it shifts between an ailing Quebec writer's regrets about his life, and his long-ago involvement in a failed West African revolution, which haunts him into the present. This translation skillfully captures the lyricism of the French text." --Governor General's Literary Prize jury "This is a novel of emotional complexity, of what it means to survive through trauma, and the repercussions of that survival." --Montreal Review of Books "A poignant, beautifully written account." --La Presse (trans. from the French) "Grim and tragic, hard and violent, but accomplished by a feverish prose that glows." --Le Devoir (trans. from the French)

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