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  • 1
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    Float Like a Butterfly, Drink Mint Tea How I Beat the Shit Out of All My Addictions Alex Wood Canada
    9781551528335 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs Publication Date:April 01, 2021
    $22.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.8 in | 430 gr | 292 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A wildly disarming memoir by comedian Alex Wood on how he overcame his multiple addictions.

      As an alcoholic, drug-addicted comedian with tendencies to over-indulge and under-achieve since he was a teenager, Alex Wood was on track for to achieve his greatest goals: to die young and drunk. At the age of twenty-eight, feeling desperate in the face of addiction and associated health problems (ulcers, pancreatitis) - which were compounded by the deaths of loved ones and even worse undiagnosed issues - he decided to do something he'd actually been doing all his life: fight.

      Alex concocted a plan to quit not only alcohol and drugs, but everything else that he felt was holding him back: cigarettes, caffeine, red meat, dairy, sugar, social media, smartphones, porn, credit cards, nail-biting, social media, and gossip. His biggest weapons? A pair of boxing gloves and plenty of peppermint tea. But as Alex soon learned, people don't change overnight, and sobriety isn't a linear journey; there's heartbreak, relapses, and abuse along the way, but there's also love, support, and lots of laughter. In this memoir, Alex wants to prove that people really can change, or go on a withdrawal-inspired murder spree, whichever comes first.

      With plenty of self-effacing wit and grace, Float like a Butterfly, Drink Mint Tea tears down the walls of shame surrounding addiction, providing an honest and open portrait of the stakes involved when one is willing to quit everything in order to survive.

      Float like a Butterfly, Drink Mint Tea is the latest title to be published under the Robin's Egg Books imprint. Robin's Egg Books features some of the freshest, smartest, and above all, funniest writing on a variety of culturally relevant subjects. Titles in the imprint are curated and edited by comedian, playwright and author Charles Demers.

      Bio

      Alex Wood is a comedian, writer, and podcaster who has been featured on NBC's Today Show, Kevin Hart's LOL, Vice, and Sirius XM Radio. His podcast How Alex Wood Quit Everything takes listeners on a journey through his addiction and subsequent recovery. Float like a Butterfly, Drink Mint Tea is his first book. He lives in Toronto.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Float like a Butterfly, Drink Mint Tea is a must-read for anybody who is thinking about trying stand-up comedy, or cocaine. This book is not just about addiction; it's a story of love, loss, laughter, stand-up comedy, and boxing. All in all, I think I was mentioned in this book just the right amount. -K. Trevor Wilson, comedian
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Green Glass Ghosts Rae Spoon Canada, Gem Hall Canada
    9781551528380 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / LGBTQ+ Age (years) from 14 Publication Date:May 04, 2021
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.6 in | 340 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      From writer and musician Rae Spoon: a rollicking yet introspective young adult adventure about screwing up, finding yourself, and forging a new life on your own.

      At age nineteen in the year 2000, the queer narrator of Green Glass Ghosts steps off a bus on Granville Street in downtown Vancouver, a city where the faceless condo towers of the wealthy loom over the streets to of the east side where folks are just trying to get by, against the deceptively beautiful backdrop of snow-capped mountains and sparkling ocean.

      Armed with only their guitar and their voice, our hopeful hero arrives on the West Coast at the beginning of the new millennium and on the cusp of adulthood, fleeing a traumatic childhood in an unsafe family plagued by religious extremism, mental health crises, and abuse in a conservative city not known for accepting difference. They're eager to build a better life among like-minded folks, and before they know it, they've got a job, an apartment, openly non-binary friends, and a new queer love, dancing, busking, and making out in bars, parks, art spaces, and apartments. But their search for belonging and stability is disrupted by excessive drinking, jealousy, and painful memories of the past, distracting the protagonist from their ultimate goal of playing live music and spurring them to an emotional crisis. If they can't learn to care for themselves, how will they ever find true connection and community?

      The haunting illustrations by Gem Hall conjure the moody, misty urban landscape and represent a deep collaboration with the author based on their shared experience of seeking safety, authenticity, and acceptance on the West Coast. Green Glass Ghosts is an evocation of that delicate, aching moment between youth and adulthood when we are trying, and often failing, to become the person we dream ourselves to be.

      Bio

      Rae Spoon is a non-binary musician, producer, and author from Treaty 7 (Calgary) living on Lekwungen territory (Victoria). Rae is the author of the Lambda Literary Award finalist First Spring Grass Fire (2012), and co-author (with Ivan Coyote) of Gender Failure (2014). Rae was awarded a Dayne Ogilvie Prize Honour of Distinction by the Writers' Trust of Canada. They are the subject of a National Film Board documentary entitled My Prairie Home (2013), which screened at film festivals internationally, including the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. They have released ten albums for which they have been nominated for two Polaris Prizes and a Western Canada Music award. They are the founder of Coax Records, dedicated to work by marginalized musicians traditionally underrepresented in the music industry.



      Gem Hall is an itinerant interdisciplinary artist of mixed Romani/British heritage currently based on Coast Salish lands. Gem is interested in creative work as a means of survival and language to express stories & songs of resilience, recovery, diaspora, and the magic of storytelling and witnessing. With a background in DIY/zine culture & queer and trans community organizing, they use illustration, textile work, writing, harp playing, tarot reading, and plant medicines to hold liminal spaces between worlds and ways of being.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Glass Ghosts is hopeful and raw in its honest depiction of how survivors experience and interface through their filters, the cautionary tale of 'medicine' becoming poison, how we sometimes need to be taught self-care, patiently by loving Others, those surrogate strangers, gently moving us toward trust, as we imperfectly seek stability on an ever-shifting coastline. -Imogen Di Sapia, associate member, European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture (ERIAC); writer/textile artist (The Selkie: Weaving and the Wild Feminine)


      Lonely and spectral and hopeful. A book about being young and queer. About trying to find community, create a home, and stay in the world despite old trauma and new harms in the places you seek safety. A tether for when you feel yourself floating away. -Jaime Burnet, musician (Sockfoot), writer (Crocuses Hatch from Snow)


      This book is wild and familiar, not unlike young queer lust, love, or existence. It perfectly encapsulates the balances between being wide-eyed and resourceful, running away and running to. Spoon and Hall clearly know that survival is a messy landscape, with as many hands pulling you down as there are lifting you up. Reading this book is being lifted up, a firm reminder of still being here. -Tara-Michelle Ziniuk, editor (THIS Magazine), writer (Whatever, Iceberg, Somewhere to Run From, Emergency Contact)


      Green Glass Ghosts chronicles the realities of queer protagonists navigating love, health, addiction, and healing in Vancouver on the cusp of the new millennium. The chaos in survival is documented by Rae Spoon's iconically poetic prose and illustrated by Gem Hall's bold yet haunting ink drawings. Green Glass Ghosts walks us through both the grit and camaraderie of underworld subcultures, with art and storytelling that doesn't alienate but encourages us to normalize our disarray. -Cristy Road Carrera, author of Next World Tarot, Spit and Passion, and Choked Up


      Rae Spoon and Gem Hall's Green Glass Ghosts documents a time that hasn't been written much about, and needs to be - a particular kind of working-class, queer/trans kid life in early 2000s Vancouver. Spoon and Hall craft a portrait of the many kinds of ghosts - of trauma, colonization, and displacement - in that place and time, and the messy, persisting dollar pizza-eating queer and trans kids trying to get by and make something different, even if we don't know how. Hall's artwork does a beautiful job of capturing this place and all the beings on both sides of the veil who inhabit this queer space of becoming. -Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha, author of Care Work and Dirty River


      Green Glass Ghosts is a compelling coming-of-age story that is so specific and yet so universal. Every queer and trans person will recognize themselves, their friends, someone they've known, loved, and lost in this novel. The collaboration between Gem Hall and Rae Spoon is tender, haunting, raw, honest, asking of us to not only look back at our past selves but also dream up different possibilities for our future. This is a book to hold in our hearts. -Kama La Mackerel, author of ZOM-FAM

  • 3
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    Travesia A Migrant Girl's Cross-Border Journey//El viaje de una joven migrante Michelle Gerster, Fiona Dunnett Canada
    9781551528366 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Girls & Women Age (years) from 12 Publication Date:April 06, 2021
    $19.95 CAD 7 x 10.5 x 0.2 in | 275 gr | 62 pages Carton Quantity:56 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A poignant bilingual YA graphic novel about a teenage girl's harrowing experience crossing the Mexico-US border.

      This compelling young adult graphic memoir, based on real events, tells the story of Gricelda, a fifteen-year-old Mexican girl who attempts to cross the border into America with her mother and younger brother in search of a better life. Their treacherous journey, filled with both heartbreak and hope, begins in Tijuana, where they are transported from house to house by strangers. Here they meet the mysterious smuggler el Guero, who promises to lead the young family through the mountains and the scorching heat of the desert and beyond. Can he prove himself by keeping them safe during the crossing? Will America be the country of dreams like they imagined? Or will adjusting to their new life in California be another type of struggle for Gricelda and her family?

      With captivating illustrations inspired by the graffiti and stencil art prevalent during the 2006 political uprising in Oaxaca, as well as local textiles and embroidery, Travesia is Gricelda's first-person account, derived from interviews with author Michelle Gerster and told in both English and Spanish, of crossing the Mexico-US border. Timely and relevant, Travesia is a vibrant and powerful testament to the desperation and resilience of millions of migrating people who endure the pain of leaving their old lives behind to embark on the perilous journey across borders in search of a new life.

      Royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to Centro Legal de la Raza, a legal services agency protecting and advancing the rights of low-income, immigrant, Black, and Latinx communities through bilingual legal representation, education, and advocacy.

      Ages 12 and up.

      Bio

      Michelle Gerster is an American photojournalist, videographer, and ESL educator based in Oakland, California, after living in Oaxaca, Mexico. Her work focuses on social justice in relation to immigration and deportation. Her photojournalism on deportation from the US to Mexico received the PROOF Emerging Photojournalist Award honourable mention. Travesia is her first book.



      Fiona Dunnett is a Canadian illustrator based in North Vancouver. She trained extensively as a visual artist and illustrator in BC and drew inspiration from living and working in Oaxaca, Mexico. She has done group and solo exhibitions around Mexico and BC, as well as illustration work for the City of Vancouver, the Federation of Post-Secondary Educators of BC, and the Vancouver Mural Festival. Her illustrations have been published in Geist and SAD Mag. She was a semifinalist for the Adobe Design Achievement Awards in 2018. Travesia is her first book.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Visually and emotionally engaging, Travesia is a call to action against our devastating immigration policies. Michelle Gerster and Fiona Dunnett beautifully convey a harrowing story that has been experienced directly by untold millions, with an intimacy that will grab your heart. -Peter Kuper, author of Diario de Oaxaca and Ruins


      Travesia is a beautifully realized tale of migration, fortitude and resilience. Gerster and Dunnett tell this tale with an intimacy that draws you near, even through the most harrowing passages. Travesia is a powerful and important work in the canon of visual storytelling. -Johnnie Christmas, author of Tartarus and Crema


      The experiences of young people are absolutely necessary parts of the dialogue about borders and migration. And in Travesia you will find an illustrated story focusing on one such protagonist that is original, tactile, and vividly rewarding. This is one voice that stands for so many, and that will enter your heart and fill it with insight and beauty. -Wayde Compton, author of The Blue Road


      Gerster, who has personal experience of family deportation, makes a noble, precise effort to represent Gricelda's voice. Full of subdued blues, yellows, and oranges, Dunnett's artwork captures the hazy scrapbook feel of memories, honoring Gricelda's story and its nightmarish cadence. A confident chronicle from a young voice at the margins. -Kirkus Reviews

  • 4
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    The Street Belongs to Us Karleen Pendleton Jimenez Canada
    9781551528403 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 8 - 12 Publication Date:May 04, 2021
    $14.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.5 in | 265 gr | 216 pages Carton Quantity:38 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A sweet middle-grade chapter book about two best friends who transform their torn-up street into a world where imaginations can run wild.

      In 1984 Los Angeles, Alex is a tomboy who would rather wear her hair short and her older brother's hand-me-downs, and Wolf is a troubled kid who's been wearing the same soldier's uniform ever since his mom died. They temporarily set their worries aside when their street is torn up by digging machines and transformed into a muddy wonderland with endless possibilities. To pass the hot summer days, the two best friends seize the opportunity to turn Muscatel Avenue into a battleground and launch a gleeful street war against the rival neighbourhood kids.

      But when Alex and Wolf make their headquarters inside a deep trench, Alex's grandmother warns them that some buried things want to be found and some want to stay hidden and forgotten. Although she has the wisdom of someone who has survived the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish Flu, and immigration to a new country, the kids ignore her warning, unearthing more than they bargained for.

      The exuberant and expressive line drawings by Gabriela Godoy perfectly capture the summers of youth, when anything feels possible and an adventure is always around the corner. Bursting with life and feeling, both the people and the land come alive in a tale interwoven with Mexican-American identity, experience, and history. The Street Belongs to Us is a story of family, friendship, and unconditional acceptance, even when it breaks your heart.

      Ages 8 to 12.

      Bio

      Karleen Pendleton Jimenez is the author of Lambda Literary Awards finalists Are You a Boy or a Girl? and How to Get a Girl Pregnant, Tomboys and Other Gender Heroes, and numerous short stories and essays. She wrote the award-winning animated film Tomboy, and has been recognized by the American Library Association and the Vice Versa Awards for Excellence in the Gay and Lesbian Press. She teaches education, gender, and social justice at Trent University. Raised in Los Angeles, she lives in Toronto with her partner and daughter.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Jimenez has painted an authentic picture of puberty with a light touch that is both respectful and endearing. Godoy's animated drawings, economical and evocative, add to the overall magic. -Linda Schuyler, co-creator and executive producer of the Degrassi franchise


      Full of humour and heart, The Street Belongs to Us is a beautiful and subversively queer story that probes the depths of intertwined human loss and connection. -Cory Silverberg, author of Sex Is a Funny Word


      Super duper wow! Jimenez's The Street Belongs to Us is an amazing read. A joyful, captivating, corazon-tugging cuento. It is all queer fun, family love y carino. -Veronica Reyes, author of Chopper! Chopper! Poetry from Bordered Lives


      The Street Belongs to Us magically addresses gender, grief, pain, longing, and illness, all with a writing cadence that makes us love each character like family. -Joie Lamar, author of Mambo Lips: A Memoir of a Girl Who Found Strength in Being Different


      Beautifully written, this story of discovery and healing reminds us of the power of digging deep in both our own yards and in those of collective history. -Olga Garcia Echeverria, author of Falling Angels: Cuentos y Poemas

      Look to The Street Belongs to Us for truth about kids, how they talk, how they mask and unmask their true feelings when faced with the hard truths of life. Truly affecting throughout to its deeply touching conclusion. -Cecile Pineda, author of Entry Without Inspection and Apology to a Whale


      This delightful and sensitive story is both rich with emotion and with cultural and historical experiences. A book tenderly written, one to be cherished and enjoyed. -Gianna Patriarca, author of Italian Women and Other Tragedies


      The Street Belongs to Us creates a complex, rich, and beautiful world. Jimenez shows us the beauty and importance of gender diversity and how kids can navigate the difficult and exciting changes that lie ahead. -Lisa Selin Davis, author of Tomboy: The Surprising History of Girls Who Dare to be Different


      Such a joy to read! The Street Belongs to Us is a wholehearted, fun story that also focuses on navigating life's challenges like puberty and losing one's mom. -Claudia Rodriguez, author of Everybody's Bread

      At once tender about how its characters accept each other's concerns without question, and humorous about their everyday adventures, this sweet portrait of an impromptu summer deepens through the children's awareness that their families don't always resemble what they'd hoped for, but that love and safety still surround them. -Foreword Reviews


      Pendleton-Jimenez offers readers a powerful middle-grade novel that not only explores Mexican-American identity but movingly explores the complications of family relationships, friendships and gender identity. -The Globe and Mail


      The Street Belongs to Us is delightfully entertaining and taps into how it feels to be young. Yet, it also has hidden depths. Readers, as well as characters, find joy in what happens on Muscatel Street, but they will dig beneath the surface to find truths about their world, themselves, and those they love. -CM Magazine


      A terrific summer read with appealing cartoon drawings interspersed throughout. Godoy's illustrations complement Jimenez's warm prose, lending a lightness to Alex's story of a pivotal summer. -Booklist (STARRED REVIEW)


      Young readers will be captivated by these strong characters who, armed with a newfound maturity, are empowered to move forward when they come to see their loved ones in a new light. -Quill and Quire

  • 5
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    How to Fail as a Popstar Vivek Shraya Canada, Brendan Healy Canada
    9781551528427 Paperback DRAMA / Canadian Publication Date:February 18, 2021
    $18.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.25 in | 210 gr | 72 pages Carton Quantity:75 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The first play by multi-media artist Vivek Shraya, about fame and personal transformation.

      Described as "cultural rocket fuel" by Vanity Fair, Vivek Shraya is a multi-media artist whose art, music, novels, and poetry and children's books explore the beauty and the power of personal and cultural transformation. How to Fail as a Popstar is Vivek's debut theatrical work, a one-person show that chronicles her journey from singing in shopping malls to "not quite" pop music superstardom with beguiling humor and insight. A reflection on the power of pop culture, dreams, disappointments, and self-determination, this astonishing work is a raw, honest, and hopeful depiction of the search to find one's authentic voice.

      The book includes colour photographs from the show's 2020 production in Toronto, and a foreword by its director Brendan Healy.

      Bio

      Vivek Shraya is an artist whose body of work crosses the boundaries of music, literature, visual art, theatre, and film. Her books include I'm Afraid of Men, The Subtweet, even this page is white, She of the Mountains, Death Threat, and The Boy & the Bindi, and her album with Queer Songbook Orchestra, Part-Time Woman, was nominated for the Polaris Music Prize. She is one half of the music duo Too Attached and the founder of the Arsenal Pulp Press imprint VS. Books. A six-time Lambda Literary Award finalist, Vivek was a Pride Toronto Grand Marshal, was featured on The Globe and Mail's Best Dressed list, and has received honours from the Writers' Trust of Canada and the Publishing Triangle. She is a director on the board of the Tegan and Sara Foundation and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Calgary.



      Brendan Healy is a theater director whose credits include the premiere production of Vivek Shraya's How to Fail as a Popstar at Canadian Stage in Toronto in 2020. He is a regular instructor at the National Theatre School of Canada.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Shraya may not have reached the top echelon of pop stardom, but sharing her persistence and self-discovery just might be a bigger gift. After all, these are the stories we rarely hear told. -NOW Magazine


      It's a moving tale that any person who's struggled to achieve their dreams can easily relate to, and Shraya has a certain magnetism to her performance that keeps the one-woman show moving fluidly. -Broadway World


      A funny, warm and honest show by a rare, 360-degree talent. -Denise Balkissoon, executive editor of Chatelaine Magazine


      The work of radical self-acceptance is so challenging I never want to do it. In this piece of art, Vivek's fearless vulnerability, steady gaze and sure hand creates another way in, an opening, and all I have to do is show up. Now it's your turn. Lucky you. -Elvira Kurt, teacup butch, comedy legend and writer for Canada's Drag Race


      Vivek Shraya's How to Fail as a Popstar is a maguffin - a demonstration of Shraya's virtuosity as a performer, a songwriter, and writer, and is anything but a failure. It is a cutting and hilarious look at the spark and afterglow of any musician entering the industry - the adolescence, adulthood, and moribundity of this creative life-within-a-life. She claims to not "have the range," but Popstar demonstrates the opposite - a multi-disciplinary artist at the height of her powers. -Owen Pallett, violinist and composer


      An important show from such an important artist. Everyone should see How to Fail as a Popstar! -Bif Naked, recording artist

  • 6
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    9781551528441 Paperback POETRY / Women Authors Publication Date:February 18, 2021
    $19.95 CAD 5.5 x 8 x 0.6 in | 220 gr | 176 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Iron Goddess of Mercy by Lambda Literary Award winner Larissa Lai (for the novel The Tiger Flu) is a long poem that captures the vengeful yet hopeful movement of the Furies mid-whirl and dance with them through the horror of the long now. Inspired by the tumultuous history of Hong Kong, from the Japanese and British occupations to the ongoing pro-democracy protests, the poem interrogates the complicated notion of identity, offering a prism through which the term 'Asian' can be understood to make sense of a complex set of relations. The self crystallizes in moments of solidity, only to dissolve and whirl away again. The poet is a windsock, catching all the affect that blows at her and ballooning to fullness, only to empty again when the wind changes direction. Iron Goddess of Mercy is a game of mah jong played deep into the night, an endless gamble.

      Presented in sixty-four fragments to honour the sixty-four hexagrams of the I Ching, Iron Goddess of Mercy also borrows from haibun, a traditional Japanese form of travel writing in which each diary entry closes with a haiku. The poem dizzies, turns on itself. It rants, it curses, it writes love letters, but as the Iron Goddess is ever changing, so is the object of her address: a maenad, Kool-Aid, Chiang Kai-shek, the economy, a clown, freedom of speech, a brother, a bother, a typist, a monster, a machine, Iris Chang, Hannah Arendt, the Greek warrior Achilles, or a deer caught in the headlights.

      Finally, a balm to the poem's devastating passion and fury, Iron Goddess of Mercy is also a type of oolong tea, a most fragrant infusion said to have been a gift from the compassionate bodhisattva Guan Yin.

      Summoning the ghosts of history and politics, Iron Goddess of Mercy explores the complexities of identity through the lens of rage and empowerment.

      Bio

      Larissa Lai is the author of three novels, The Tiger Flu (Lambda Literary Award winner), Salt Fish Girl, and When Fox is a Thousand, and three poetry books, Sybil Unrest (with Rita Wong), Automaton Biographies (shortlisted for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize), and Iron Goddess of Mercy. She is also the winner of Lambda Literary's Jim Duggins Outstanding Mid-Career Novelists' Prize, and an Astraea Foundation Award. She holds a Canada Research Chair in Creative Writing at the University of Calgary where she directs the Insurgent Architects' House for Creative Writing.. Her latest novel, The Lost Century, will publish in fall 2022.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Dear reader, I'm always impressed by the power of Lai's imagination to dislocate us from reality in order to reattach us more meaningfully. Neither her worlds nor her words behave as they should. She liberates everything she touches to recombine with whatever it pleases. Billie Jean King can live next to Michael Jackson's 'Billie Jean.' Strands of Indigenous, Black, and Asian movements merge into recombinant DNA. Dear reader, in this intense, sustained long poem, Lai finds a form for everything we don't want to talk about -"smile now I don't understand why you're so upset" - but must. -Ian Williams, author of Personals


      Lai allows a tumble of history to seethe through Iron Goddess of Mercy. The high energy of her playful, cutting prose poetry is counter-posed with restful, concluding lyrics, with the two becoming one in a short sequence of visual poetry at book's end. A full banquet of poetic synthesis, serving up 'the long now' and 'the wide I' - a very satisfying poetry collection. -Joanne Arnott, author of Halfling Spring


      Dear Reader, I don't think I've ever experienced the intensity of an epistolary 'voice' performed with such impact as this Iron Goddess jamming through the syllables of an explosive imagination, then landing, simply, on a haiku. Larissa Lai's writing in this book is a phenomenal instance of improvisation that attracts and challenges our readerly dexterity. Dear Reader, Dear deer in the headlights, Dear 'people of the on/ off switch' - Stop, Look, and Listen. -Fred Wah, author of Music at the Heart of Thinking


      Iron Goddess of Mercy is a work of fierce, mad genius. Composing with equal parts chaos and precise form, Larissa Lai weaves the English language, the love letter and the haibun, historic violence and contemporary geopolitics, pop culture references, unrelenting rage and wicked humour into a polyphonic storm of meaning and emotion, like an ancient sorcerer bending the elements with many arms. With seemingly effortless virtuosity, the author spins us through a kaleidoscopic view of how empire building, occupation and revolution shape the individual and collective soul. No poetry lover, activist, historian or spiritual seeker could possibly fail to fall to their knees before Lai's Iron Goddess. Take heed, readers. These are the words of a master. -Kai Cheng Thom, author of a place called No Homeland

      Where does thinking go? We worry about the island of plastic growing in the Pacific Ocean, but what about the cyclone of thoughts that gather in our collective third eye? In Iron Goddess of Mercy, Larissa Lai is breaking her way through language pileups, hooking syllables onto syntax, looping modernity over history over time. What doesn't hang us we might weave into a haibun, that most magical of forms that allows all the sprawl of prose and all the precision of the haiku. 'What if, in spite of everything forgotten, the whole fabric remains swimming or stitching in fish form?' This is a tale of renewal: in the future we will all need to carry much, much more, and we really need to make light of it. -Sina Queyras, author of My Ariel


      Iron Goddess of Mercy confronts a nightmarish inventory of the costs of human desire and ambition. Yet Lai's 'poethic' vision thrives by a poetry of grand imagination and sonic depth. Hidden scenes of unjust histories are spun out from modern life's random narratives of fanfare toward the stabilizing richness of epiphany. Here is mourning and celebration as Lai deals hard-won blows to the limiting strictness of reason. Here we emerge with better names for common things in their hypnotic globe of urgent transformation. -Canisia Lubrin, author of The Dyzgraphxst and Voodoo Hypothesis


      Iron Goddess of Mercy is magic and revelation ... a masterful long poem that spins in and out of chaos and order.

      -Quill and Quire


      Lai charges through a wide range of subjects, including Asian stereotypes ("when does my slant/signal untrustworthy?"), capitalism ("glorifying blonds and bonds/in markets and mansions") and her family ties to Hong Kong and "the gashes of the past." The result is both polemical and wildly inventive. -Toronto Star


      Lai's bold technique of addressing and re-addressing the big legacies of the twenty first century points to the kind of work it takes to stay alive and conscious ... Through it all, she uses the slippages of syntax and sound to highlight the inadequacy and power of speech, the saying with unsaying, to speak truth to power about the load-bearing pressures on a body. Listen to the Iron Goddess: she knows. -Arc Poetry

  • 7
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    nedi nezu (Good Medicine) Tenille K. Campbell Canada
    9781551528465 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:February 18, 2021
    $17.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.5 in | 170 gr | 92 pages Carton Quantity:60 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Indigenous Voices Award finalist

      A celebratory, slyly funny, and bluntly honest take on sex and romance in NDN Country.

      nedi nezu (Good Medicine) explores the beautiful space that being a sensual Indigenous woman creates - not only as a partner, a fantasy, a heartbreak waiting to happen but also as an auntie, a role model, a voice that connects to others walking the same path. From the online hookup world of DMs, double taps, and secret texts to earth-shakingly erotic encounters under the northern stars to the ever-complicated relationship Indigenous women have with mainstream society, this poetry collection doesn't shy away from depicting the gorgeous diversity in decolonized desire. Instead, Campbell creates the most intimate of spaces, where the tea is hot and a seat is waiting, surrounded by the tantalizing laughter of aunties telling stories.

      These wise, jubilant poems chronicle many failed attempts at romance, with the wry humour needed to not take these heartbreaks personally, and the growth that comes from sitting in the silence of living a solo life in a world that insists everyone should be partnered up. With a knowing smile, this book side-eyes the political existence and celebrates the lived experience of an Indigenous woman falling in love and lust with those around her -but, most importantly, with herself.

      nedi nezu is a smart, sensual, and scandalous collection dripping in Indigenous culture yet irresistible to anyone in thrall to the magnificent disaster that is dating, sex, and relationships.

      Bio
      Tenille K. Campbell is a Dene/Métis author and photographer from English River First Nation in In Treaty Ten, northern Saskatchewan. Her acclaimed poetry collection, #IndianLovesPoems (Signature Editions), was shortlisted for the Indigenous Voices Award. Campbell is the force behind sweetmoon photography, which specializes in capturing NDN joy in its many forms. She is also the co-creator and a blogger at tea&bannock, an online collective for Indigenous women photographers and artists to share their stories. Campbell completed her MFA in creative writing at the University of British Columbia and is working on a doctoral degree in Indigenous Literature at the University of Saskatchewan.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Indigenous Voices Award 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Dare we all have such an opportunity to revel in the intimate oratories of Tenille K. Campbell's matriarchy. She asks us to 'know that we are in ceremony' as she undertakes an album of sensual and sexual vignettes rinsed clean of seeds in gentle spring waters. Alternatively, she interrogates fatphobia, Indigenous masculinities, academia, heteropatriarchy, and untangles the ways in which poetry hinges on the pervasive in the stratosphere of social media. Campbell shows us yet again why Indigeneity is wholly and irrevocably erotic by nature. -Joshua Whitehead, author of Jonny Appleseed


      Since I was hit on by someone using lines from #IndianLovePoems and immediately went out to buy it, I've been eagerly waiting for Tenille K. Campbell's next collection. What a joy and a blessing to find myself in pages as intimate as staying up late with your best friend sharing truths, as hot as meeting your next lover's gaze, and as sharp as a mean auntie. nedi nezu cements Campbell's reputation as the matriarch of decolonized desire. -Eden Robinson, author of Trickster Drift


      There are many kinds of intimacy in Tenille Campbell's delicious second collection: that of laughing lovers entangled in damp sheets under the star-strewn northern sky; that of a Dene/Metis woman dreaming her relations with the living land, its histories, and its futures; that of a formidably talented woman in all her complex contexts - poet, scholar, mother, lover - who shifts with ease between evocations of knee-trembling desire, wry humour, tender kindness, and aching loneliness. The poems are a love-language that honours the messy, meaningful complexities of sensual self-determination, the fierce assertion of an Indigenous woman's embodied and visionary power. We are lucky indeed to have the restorative gift of Campbell's work in this ever more alienating world. Read it, share it, be transformed. -Daniel Heath Justice, author of Why Indigenous Literatures Matter


      Campbell seamlessly portrays the quality of blending tradition with everyday life in today's world throughout the collection ... [Campbell] shows that she has no trouble maintaining her connections to her heritage while also living in the present moment; indeed, she refuses to operate as if they are mutually exclusive. -Arc Poetry


      Campbell's warmth and willingness to show us her heart (and heartbreak) result in poems that are endearing, hilarious and moving. -Geist

  • 8
    catalogue cover
    Our Work Is Everywhere An Illustrated Oral History of Queer and Trans Resistance Syan Rose, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha Canada
    9781551528151 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Contemporary Women Publication Date:March 01, 2021
    $23.95 CAD 9 x 12 x 0.25 in | 540 gr | 92 pages Carton Quantity:25 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A visually stunning graphic non-fiction book on queer and trans resistance.

      Over the past ten years, we have witnessed the rise of queer and trans communities that have defied and challenged those who have historically opposed them. Through bold, symbolic imagery and surrealist, overlapping landscapes, queer illustrator and curator Syan Rose shines a light on the faces and voices of these diverse, amorphous, messy, real, and imagined queer and trans communities.

      In their own words, queer and trans organizers, artists, healers, comrades, and leaders speak honestly and authentically about their own experiences with power, love, pain, and magic to create a textured and nuanced portrait of queer and trans realities in America. The many themes include Black femme mental health, Pacific Islander authorship, fat queer performance art, disability and health care practice, sex worker activism, and much more. Accompanying the narratives are Rose's startling and sinuous images that brings these leaders' words to visual life.

      Our Work Is Everywhere is a graphic non-fiction book that underscores the brilliance and passion of queer and trans resistance.

      Includes a foreword by Lambda Literary Award-winning author and activist Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, author of Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice.

      Full-colour throughout.

      Bio
      Syan Rose is an illustrator and comic artist whose work plays with both surrealist and representational imagery to approach topics of personal history, politics, accountability, and healing. Sheâ??s been published in Bitch, Slate, Gay Magazine, Truthout, and Autostraddle, and has self-produced many comics and zines.

      Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (she/they) is a mixed-blood, middle-aged, nonbinary femme disabled and autistic writer, disability and transformative justice cultural and movement worker of Burgher and Tamil Sri Lankan, Irish and Galician ascent. A crip web weaver, couch and porch witch, they are the author and/or co-editor of nine books, including Beyond Survival ((with Ejeris Dixon), Tonguebreaker, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice, Dirty River, and Bodymap. A Lambda Literary Award winner who has been shortlisted for the Publishing Triangle five times, they are the winner of Lambda's 2020 Jeanne Cordova Award "honoring a lifetime of work documenting the complexities of queer of color/femme/disabled experience" and are a 2020 Disability Futures Fellow. Raised in rustbelt central Massachusetts and shaped by T'karonto and Oakland, they currently make home in Massachusetts. They are an adaptive trike rider and a triple grand water trine. Their newest book, The Future Is Disabled: Prophecies, Love Notes and Mourning Songs, will be published in fall 2022.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Lambda Literary Award 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Our Work Is Everywhere embodies its own name, as every page offers wisdom everywhere; whether we are taking in narratives of resistance and survival from across the queer community; or witnessing the visual spectacle that holds every word in handwritten text and illustrations. From surviving class warfare and structural oppression, to allowing our bodies to experience the tender calm that queer resistance begs for, Our Work Is Everywhere is a collection of interviews, stories, and lessons on reworking and rewriting power. -Cristy Road Carrera, author and artist, Next World Tarot and Spit and Passion


      With this honest exploration of the lives of some of the most marginalized people in society, Syan Rose has crafted an artwork that is profoundly moving and inspiring. -BOMB


      In this collection, Syan Rose has created full, lovely and sensitively drawn portraits of the humans who set the world aright. -Molly Crabapple, author of Drawing Blood, and Brothers of the Gun with Marwan Hisham

      Syan Rose is an artist who is deeply dedicated to the narratives of her Queer and Trans communities. In Our Work Is Everywhere, Sarah transforms the comics genre into short form poetic portraits of her peers and elders with such tenderness, love, and reverence. -Jessica de Jesus, creative director at Bitch Media


      A unique, empowering addition to LGBTQ+ literature. -Kirkus Reviews


      An inspirational volume for current and aspiring queer community workers to 'keep showing up' to build a better world together. -Publishers Weekly


      Reading this beautiful collection of oral histories and interviews feels likes sitting down with a bunch of rad queer and trans artists, healers, and activists, and listening to them talk about what inspires them, angers them, fuels them. The art is truly unique - each page feels like its own work of art. Here you'll find stories about ancestral wisdom, the power of queer tarot, mutual aid organizations, community gardening initiatives, radical wealth redistribution, and so much more more. It's an inspiring book spilling over with LGBTQ+ brilliance and creativity. -Book Riot


      This genre-bending anthology about queer and trans resistance packs a big punch for a short book. It moves between interviews, essays, conversations, and more, all accompanied by Rose's intricate, expansive illustrations. Containing both rage and celebration, the book explores topics such as Black femme mental health, sex worker activism, and queer fat performance art. -Autostraddle ("Best Queer Books of the Year")

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