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    catalogue cover
    Hood Feminism Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot Mikki Kendall
    9780525560562 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Feminism & Feminist Theory On Sale Date:February 23, 2021
    $22.00 CAD 5 x 7.7 x 0.75 in | 0.46 lb | 288 pages Carton Quantity:24 Penguin Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A New York Times Bestseller

      A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2020

      A potent and electrifying critique of today’s feminist movement announcing a fresh new voice in black feminism

      “My wish is that every white woman who calls herself a feminist (as I do) will read this book in a state of hushed and humble respect.”—Elizabeth Gilbert


      Today’s feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?

      In her searing collection of essays, Mikki Kendall takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement, arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women. Drawing on her own experiences with hunger, violence, and hypersexualization, along with incisive commentary on politics, pop culture, the stigma of mental health, and more, Hood Feminism delivers an irrefutable indictment of a movement in flux. An unforgettable debut, Kendall has written a ferocious clarion call to all would-be feminists to live out the true mandate of the movement in thought and in deed.
      Bio
      Mikki Kendall is a New York Times bestselling writer, speaker, and blogger whose work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Guardian, Time, Salon, Ebony, Essence, and elsewhere. An accomplished public speaker, she has discussed race, feminism, violence in Chicago, tech, pop culture, and social media on Good Morning America, The Daily Show, MSNBC, NPR, Al Jazeera’s The Listening Post, BBC’s Woman’s Hour, and Huff Post Live, as well as at universities across the country. In 2017, she was awarded Best Food Essay from the Association of Food Journalists for her essay on hot sauce, Jim Crow, and Beyoncé. She is also the author of Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women’s Fight for Their Rights and a co-editor of the Locus-nominated anthology Hidden Youth, as well as a part of the Hugo-nominated team of editors at Fireside Magazine. A veteran, she lives in Chicago with her family.

      Author Residence: Chicago, IL

      Author Hometown: Chicago, IL
      Marketing & Promotion
        Marketing: Online advertising

        Social media and online promotion

        MikkiKendall.com/ Twitter/ Instagram/ Facebook



        Publicity: New in Paperback Coverage



        Author Website: MikkiKendall.com

        Author Social Media: Twitter: @Karnythia; Facebook.com/Mikki Kendall; IG:@Karnythia
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Named a Best Book of 2020 by Bustle, BBC, and Time
      Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2020

      “In prose that is clean, crisp, and cutting, Kendall reveals how feminism has both failed to take into account populations too often excluded from the banner of feminism and failed to consider the breadth of issues affecting the daily lives of millions of women…. Throughout, Kendall thoughtfully and deliberately takes mainstream feminism to task…[but] if Hood Feminism is a searing indictment of mainstream feminism, it is also an invitation. For every case in which Kendall highlights problematic practices, she offers guidance for how we can all do better.”
      —NPR

      “With poise and clarity, Kendall lays out the case for why feminists need to fight not just for career advancement but also for basic needs and issues that often plague women of color, including food security, educational access, a living wage and safety from gun violence. In expertly tying the racial justice and feminist movements together, Kendall’s is one of the most important books of the current moment.”
      —Time, “100 Must-Read Books of 2020”

      Hood Feminism paints a brutally candid and unobstructed portrait of mainstream white feminism: a narrow movement that disregards the needs of the overwhelming majority of women. In the storied tradition of Black feminism stretching back to Maria Stewart, Kendall persuasively contends that women’s basic needs are feminist issues. The fights against hunger, homelessness, poverty, health disparities, poor schools, homophobia, transphobia, and domestic violence are feminist fights. Kendall offers a feminism rooted in the livelihood of everyday women.”
      —Ibram X. Kendi, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of  How to Be an Antiracist, in The Atlantic

      “Beautifully centers on the experience of women who face an actual battle on the front lines while mainstream feminists clamor for access to the officers’ club.”
      —The Washington Post

      “A searing indictment of…the modern feminist movement’s failure to support marginalized women and to integrate issues of race, class and sexual orientation.”
      —USA Today

      “This book is an act of fierce love and advocacy, and it is urgently necessary.” 
      —Samantha Irby, author of Meaty and We Are Never Meeting in Real Life
       
      “Mikki’s book is a rousing call to action for today’s feminists. It should be required reading for everyone.” 
      —Gabrielle Union, author of We’re Going to Need More Wine

      “Cutting, critical, and consequential, Hood Feminism is required reading for anyone who calls himself or herself a feminist, an urgent piece of feminist discourse. It’s a tough read—especially if you’ve been giving yourself woke feminist gold stars—but that makes it all the more necessary.”
      —Marie Claire


      “My wish is that every white woman who calls herself a feminist (as I do) will read this book in a state of hushed and humble respect. Mikki Kendall is calling out white feminists here—and it’s long overdue that we drop our defenses, listen to her arguments carefully, and then change our entire way of thinking and behaving. As Kendall explains in eloquent and searing simplicity, any feminism that focuses on inequality between men and women without addressing the inequalities BETWEEN women is not only useless, but actually harmful. In the growing public conversation about race, class, status, privilege, and power, this text is essential reading.”
      Elizabeth Gilbert

      “Elicits action by effectively calling out privilege…This can be a tough read, even for the most woke and intersectional feminist, and that’s exactly how it should be.”
       —Bust

      “Hood Feminism is a critical feminist text that interrogates the failings of the mainstream feminist movement and gives us the necessary expertise of Black women. Kendall skillfully illuminates the many intersections of identity and shows us the beauty and power of anger.” 
      —Erika L. Sánchez, author of Lessons on Expulsion and I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

      “Kendall is a highly knowledgeable and inspiring guide, and she effectively builds on the work of black women who have, for ages, been working to better the lives of themselves and their communities….  A much-needed addition to feminist discourse.” 
      Kirkus Reviews

      “In this forceful and eloquent series of essays, [Kendall] takes on the feminist myopia that ignores the daily existential struggles of women of color and encourages a broader support of society’s most vulnerable citizens. If such support is forthcoming and awareness expanded, then not only will those outside the feminist establishment be empowered, those within the current movement will also be enlightened as to their cause’s true universal potential.”
      —Booklist 

      “A frank account of who and what is still missing from mainstream feminism that will appeal to readers of women’s and African American studies, and readers seeking a better grasp on history.”
      —Library Journal

      “An energizing critique of the feminist movement’s preference for white women.”
      —BookPage

       “Mikki Kendall tells it like it is, and this is why she has long been a must-read writer for me: incisive, clear-eyed, and rightly willing to challenge readers when necessary. Her exploration of how feminists’ fight for liberation has too often left poor people, Black people, Indigenous people, and other people of color behind is critical reading for anyone who is or wants to be involved in work addressing complex and longstanding inequalities.” 
      —Nicole Chung, author of All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir

      “Mikki has been writing for years about protection, ‘problem children,’ the limits and the usefulness of different kinds of anger, and the way sisterhood can be wielded as a demand. She’s here for her community, and this book has everything to do with expanding access to it.” 
      —Daniel Mallory Ortberg, author of The Merry Spinster and Texts from Jane Eyre

      “Mikki Kendall has established herself as an important voice in current feminist discourse, and Hood Feminism cements that place. With a compelling, forceful piece, Kendall has written the missive that feminists—especially white feminists—need to remember the racist history of who we are as a movement and to move forward with an intersectional and deliberately anti-racist focus.” 
      —Dianna Anderson, author of Problematic

      “Every white lady should have this book assigned to them before they can talk about feminism in the same way that every human should have to work in the service industry for a year before they can talk about the economy. Ain’t nothing but truth in these words.” 
      —Linda Tirado, author of Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    9780735281493 Hardcover FICTION / Absurdist On Sale Date:January 05, 2021
    $29.95 CAD 5.6 x 8.5 x 1.1 in | 0.98 lb | 288 pages Carton Quantity:12 Knopf Canada
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      An exhilarating, clever, funny debut novel from a prize-winning talent, chronicling the misadventures of a lovelorn Victorian lexicographer and the young woman who decodes his trail of made-up words a century later. Will enthrall readers of CS Richardson, Helen Simonson’s Major Pettigrew and Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine.

      Mountweazel n. the phenomenon of false entries within dictionaries and works of reference. Often used as a safeguard against copyright infringement.

      Peter Winceworth is a lexicographer in Victorian-era London, toiling away at the letter “S” for a multi-volume Encyclopaedic Dictionary. Secretly, he begins to insert unauthorized fictitious entries into the dictionary in an attempt to assert some artistic freedom.

      In the present day, Mallory is a young intern employed by the same publisher. Her task is to uncover these mountweazels before the dictionary is digitized. She also has to contend with threatening phone calls from an anonymous caller. Why, she wonders, is the change in the definition of “marriage” so upsetting to the caller? And does the caller really intend for the publisher’s staff to “burn in hell”?

      As these two narratives, characters and times entwine, both Winceworth and Mallory discover how they might negotiate the complexities of the nonsensical, relentless, untrustworthy, hoax-strewn and undefinable path we call life. An exhilarating debut from a formidably brilliant young writer, The Liar’s Dictionary celebrates the rigidity, fragility, absurdity and joy of language.


      Story Locale: London, UK
      Bio
      ELEY WILLIAMS is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. She is the author of Attrib. and her work has appeared in The Penguin Book of the Contemporary British Short Story, Liberating the Canon, The Times Literary Supplement, and the London Review of Books. She lives in London, UK.

      Author Residence: London, UK
      Marketing & Promotion
        Author Website: eleywilliams.com/

        Author Social Media: Twitter: @GiantRatSumatra
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      NATIONAL BESTSELLER

      The Liar’s Dictionary is the book I was longing for. So eudaemonical, so felicific and habile! A harlequinade of cachinnation! It’s hilarious and smart and charming and I loved it. Read it. It’s the book you’re longing for.” —Andrew Sean Greer, 2018 Pulitzer Prize winner for Less

      “Infused with the essence of Wodehouse and Wilde, The Liar’s Dictionary is by turns madly eccentric, gracefully poignant, and laugh-out-loud funny. Eley Williams confirms her abilities as virtuoso wordsmith, offering an homage to the oddball-ishness of English (both the language and the nationality), as well as cautionary tales regarding, among other topics, the wrestling of pelicans and the ribald nature of certain museum statuary.” —CS Richardson, author of The End of the Alphabet

      “An improbably enchanting, rollicking novel about two generations of put-upon London lexicographers,The Liar’s Dictionary is positively intoxicated with the joy and wonder of language, both authentic and, often hilariously, counterfeit, and I can assure you that it’s quite the contact high. Eley Williams brings erudition and playfulness—and lovely sweetness—to every page.” —Benjamin DreyerNew York Times bestselling author of Dreyer’s English 

      “[W]onderful…. This book takes the most unpromising of heroes—two lexicographers—and then sets them loose in an effervescent romp about language, love and life. If you like puns, crosswords, Scrabble, the Urban Dictionary or simply enjoy witty writing, this sweet, slyly structured, unexpectedly touching book will go down like a hot fudge sundae…. Every page is intoxicated with words…. It is never less than a delight and a wise one at that.” —John Powers, NPR

      “A virtuoso performance full of charm…It’s simultaneously a love story, an office comedy, a sleuth mystery and a slice of gaslit late Victoriana…The Liar’s Dictionary is a glorious novel—a perfectly crafted investigation of our ability to define words and their power to define us.” —The Guardian

      “Perfectly calibrated…For a novel as finely tuned as this, to leave one with a sense of the intoxicating hopefulness of chance is its greatest achievement in a competitive field.” —Los Angeles Review of Books 

      “[A] pitch-perfect lexical romp filled with flawed-but-adorable characters and delightfully inventive words…. [B]e prepared to be dazzled.” —South China Morning Post

      “A remarkable novel…Original and often very funny, The Liar’s Dictionary is an offbeat exploration of both the delights of language and its limitations.” —Sunday Times (UK)

      “Comically inventine…The author combines a Nabokovian love of wordplay with an Ali Smith–like ability to create eccentric characters who will take up permanent residence in the reader’s heart. This is a sheer delight for word lovers.” —Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)
  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Not on My Watch How a renegade whale biologist took on governments and industry to save wild salmon Alexandra Morton Canada
    9780735279667 Hardcover BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Environmentalists & Naturalists On Sale Date:March 23, 2021
    $35.00 CAD 6.29 x 9.27 x 1.21 in | 1.31 lb | 384 pages Carton Quantity:12 Canadian Rights: Y Random House Canada
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      NATIONAL BESTSELLER



      Alexandra Morton has been called “the Jane Goodall of Canada” because of her passionate thirty-year fight to save British Columbia’s wild salmon. Her account of that fight is both inspiring in its own right and a roadmap of resistance.


      Alexandra Morton came north from California in the early 1980s, following her first love—the northern resident orca. In remote Echo Bay, in the Broughton Archipelago, she found the perfect place to settle into all she had ever dreamed of: a lifetime of observing and learning what these big-brained mammals are saying to each other. She was lucky enough to get there just in time to witness a place of true natural abundance, and learned how to thrive in the wilderness as a scientist and a single mother.

      Then, in 1989, industrial aquaculture moved into the region, chasing the whales away. Her fisherman neighbours asked her if she would write letters on their behalf to government explaining the damage the farms were doing to the fisheries, and one thing led to another. Soon Alex had shifted her scientific focus to documenting the infectious diseases and parasites that pour from the ocean farm pens of Atlantic salmon into the migration routes of wild Pacific salmon, and then to proving their disastrous impact on wild salmon and the entire ecosystem of the coast.

      Alex stood against the farms, first representing her community, then alone, and at last as part of an uprising that built around her as ancient Indigenous governance resisted a province and a country that wouldn’t obey their own court rulings. She has used her science, many acts of protest and the legal system in her unrelenting efforts to save wild salmon and ultimately the whales—a story that reveals her own doggedness and bravery but also shines a bright light on the ways other humans doggedly resist the truth. Here, she brilliantly calls those humans to account for the sake of us all.


      Story Locale: Vancouver, British Columbia
      Bio
      ALEXANDRA MORTON is a field biologist who became an activist who has done groundbreaking research on the damaging impact of ocean-based salmon farming on the coast of British Columbia. She first studied communications in bottlenosed dolphins and then moved on to recording and analyzing the sounds of captive orcas at Marineland of the Pacific in California, where she witnessed the birth, and death, of the first orca conceived in captivity. In 1984, she moved to the remote BC coast, aiming to study the language and culture of wild orca clans, but soon found herself at the heart of a long fight to protect the wild salmon that are the province’s keystone species. She has co-authored more than twenty scientific papers on the impact of salmon farming on migratory salmon, founded the Salmon Coast Research Station, has been featured on 60 Minutes, and has been key to many legal and protest actions against the industry, including the recent First Nations-led occupation of salmon farms on the Broughton.

      Author Residence: Sointula and Echo Bay, BC

      Author Hometown: Connecticut
      Marketing & Promotion
        Feature Website: raincoastresearch.com

        Author Website: alexandramorton.ca

        Author Social Media: Twitter: @alex4salmon
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      NATIONAL BESTSELLER

      “[O]ne of the most important reads to come out of B.C., if not the country, this year…. It’s a story that’s heartbreaking, infuriating, shocking, suspenseful, and inspiring. And it’s a tale that continues to unfold.” —Stir

      “[Not on My Watch] doesn’t read as an angry polemic. Rather, it’s an outline of a life spent standing up for something.” —Dana Gee, Vancouver Sun

      “Alex Morton’s Not on My Watch, like Silent Spring, should touch off a national debate about rights and obligations, and while we’re at it, about decolonization. If Not on My Watch needs to be peer reviewed, those peers should include ordinary people with a thirst for justice and common sense. And every politician should be judged by their reaction to this book.” —The Tyee

      “This is an important book filled with cautionary tales for anyone who cares about the environment. It is also a moving and well written human story. Highly recommended.” —Tom Sandborn, Vancouver Sun

      “A devastating literary exposé of one of the greatest scandals of recent Canadian history. What begins as a wholly human memoir of a reluctant activist takes on the urgency of a murder thriller—one in which the victims are wild salmon, coastal communities, science and democracy.” —J.B. MacKinnon, author of The Once and Future World: Nature As It Was, As It Is, As It Could Be
       
      “How does a scientist and mother fight both foreign-owned fish farm cartels and lying governments? Alexandra Morton provides a thrilling recipe: a wallop of persistence, three decades of science, cups of stubbornness and the salt of undaunted courage. If the Pacific Northwest Coast’s wild salmon can survive our industrial assault on their very existence, credit must go to the indomitable courage of Alex Morton and a brave renaissance in First Nations governance.” —Andrew Nikiforuk, author of Empire of Beetle and Slickwater
       
      “Not on My Watch is an urgent, essential read for anyone who cares about the rapidly dwindling wild salmon population of British Columbia.  Meticulous, penetrating and passionate, Morton’s thorough exploration of the history and effect of placing an industrial zone in prime wild salmon habitat is chilling and infuriating.” —Eden Robinson, author of the Trickster Trilogy

      “If ever there was a Mother Teresa for the voiceless inhabitants of the rivers of Pacific Canada, for the salmon and orca whales and small-scale fishers and others, that unstoppable voice has been Alexandra Morton’s. Grounded in science, rooted in a just cause, driven to find answers that come only with painstaking work—and most importantly, right all along—Alexandra Morton endured decades of harassment, lies and threats by people who profit from destroying ages-old sources of life. Her resolute strength through it all will inspire new defenders of wild things and wild places for generations to come. Fundamentally, this is Alexandra Morton’s compelling, sometimes maddening story of unstoppable love.” —Carl Safina, author of Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace, and of Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel

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