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  • 1
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    The Knowing Animals Emily Skov-Nielsen Canada
    9781771315333 Paperback POETRY / Subjects & Themes Publication Date:September 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 5.7 x 8.5 x 0.1 in | 200 gr | 101 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2021 New Brunswick Book Awards Shortlist * 2021 ReLit Awards Shortlist

      Poems that sing, in various notes of female voice, the human being as an embodied, contemplative, feeling animal.

      In Skov-Nielsen's thrumming debut, The Knowing Animals, our consciousness is interconnected with the surrounding trees, bugs, rivers, atmospheres, and cosmos. Here, flowers escape Victorian domestication and ally with girls' green powers of attraction. Here, the social politeness of motherly domesticity and the raw dangers of adolescent sexual awakening are shot through with blood pulsing under the skin, with oxygen exchanged in gasps of breath. Here, everything tender and petalling is also raw and mothervisceral.

      This is a book of entanglements: the poems twist and turn through a plurality of metaphorical associations involving botany, zoology, astronomy, biology, psychology, and mythology to complicate and expand human conceptions of nature. At the same time, they explore themes such as motherhood, pregnancy and birth, sexuality, adolescence, and the rise of technology, all the while shifting through a variety of tones: romantic, mythological, religious, scientific, wistful, and playful.

      Bio

      Emily Skov-Nielsen is an MA graduate from UNB's English/Creative program. Her poems have been published (and longlisted in several contests) in journals across Canada including The Malahat Review, The Fiddlehead, The Puritan, CV2, Prairie Fire, and PRISM international. She is the author of Volta (Anstruther Press, 2017). She currently works for The Fiddlehead, Atlantic Canada's International Literary Journal. In the past she worked for several years at a bookstore, was an Adult Education Instructor, and has dabbled in social work. She currently lives and writes in Fredericton, NB.

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      Awards
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      "These poems prod and sing, distilling language with technical precision and the intimacy of a perceptive mind at work. Skov-Nielsen speaks to the urgency of the world we inhabit, particularly attuned to how the personal is entangled with the ecological. The Knowing Animals is incisive and insightful, a debut that rouses us into a realm 'suspended between the gutter / and the incandescent bulb of sky.'" — Cassidy McFadzean, author of Hacker Packer and Drolleries

      "Saturated and prowling with a mesmerizing, tear-away cast of nocturnal animals, satellites, fireflies, toadstools, and Instagram characters playing their hands fast and loose—they may lay claim to this lush book, but don't be lulled or gulled. These daring, over-the-top, five-sided, lyrical poems will keep you awake, basking in fever-bright light, rewilding and transforming your life, if you let them through the door." — Jan Conn, author of Tomorrow's Bright White Light

      "The Knowing Animals drops an omniscient wild into multi-generational domesticity. Skov-Nielsen's poems burst cellular, a corporeal blossoming that mistakes technology for bird call, often blurring the line between human-animal identities. Like a live rabbit freed from the fox's mouth, these poems twitch to run." — Emily Nilsen, author of Otolith

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    9781771315302 Paperback POETRY / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 8.75 x 0.4 in | 220 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:56 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      2021 VMI Betsy Warland Between Genres Award Shortlist * 2021 Elgin Awards Longlist

      Poems written by Cyborgs in the future—this collection melds sci-fi and poetry, human and machine.

      The Cyborg Anthology takes place in a future where there was a thriving world of Robots and Cyborgs living peacefully beside Humans, but a disaster destroyed all Robot and most Cyborg life.

      The book is organized like a typical anthology of literature, split into sections that include a biography of each poet and a sample of their poetry. It covers early Cyborg poetry, political, celebrity, and pop culture poets, and ends with the next generation of Cyborg poets.

      The narrative takes place in the time after a cataclysmic event, and the collection wrestles with this loss. Through the lives of the poets, the book chronicles the history of personhood for technological beings, their struggle for liberation, and demonstrates different ways a person can be Cyborg. The poems and biographies together tell the story of a complex and enthralling world-to-come, exploring topics that are important in the future, and also urgent right now.

      Bio

      Lindsay B-e is a writer and filmmaker from Clavet, SK, currently living in Toronto. They have a BA in English, a BFA in Filmmaking, a Certificate in Poetry from The Writer's Studio at SFU, and are completing a Novel-Writing Certificate from U of T Continuing Studies. Their writing has appeared in Poetry Is Dead, the League of Canadian Poets' Poetry Pause, Geez Magazine, Peach Mag, emerge: The Writer's Studio Anthology, and a chapbook from bird, buried press. Lindsay is married with two kids, two dogs, and two cats. They can be found online at biseenscene.com.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      "Lindsay B-e's book The Cyborg Anthology is vast in its ambitions, a polyvocal text that speculates into existence a whole population of poets, and writes their verse as it evolves through the world the author has created." — Judge Wayde Compton, 2021 VMI Betsy Warland Between Genres Award

      "With mordant wit and a playful satiric touch, these Cyborg poems showcase a dazzling range of poetic forms and ideas: imaginative and charmingly subversive. Move over Norton Anthology of Poetry, there's a new force in town, and they are a delight." — Renée Sarojini Saklikar, author of Listening to the Bees and Children of Air India

      "The premise of this collection alone is fabulous. The poems are potent and powerful. With echoes of Le Guin, Brunner and Monáe, Lindsay B-e's debut is layered and smart, provocative, and deeply satisfying. I was moved and fascinated. Speculative poetry at its best." — Hiromi Goto, author of Chorus of Mushrooms and Darkest Light

  • 3
    catalogue cover
    9781771315364 Paperback POETRY / Women Authors Publication Date:November 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 8.75 x 0.4 in | 228 gr | 98 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Winner of the 2021 A. M. Klein Prize for Poetry * 2021 ReLit Awards Longlist

      A love story to the emotional self—this heart is tender, but it also has a savage bite.

      What does it mean to be the big heart? Or to hope to be the big heart? Or to fail to be that big heart? How far can a heart stretch? How does being a parent stretch it further? How does a heart manage under the pressure of children, of self, of hospital technician, of partner, of death? In this collection, big heartedness is both demand and desire. It emerges from family life—the kid who says to your face that she prefers her other parent; the father monkeying around in the art gallery; the mother who "gets on with it" in silence; the husband, distant and intimate under the marriage yoke. There is also in this collection the stirring of wilder desires than family is supposed to nurture, feelings more fiercely self-assertive than a parent—a mother particularly—is supposed to admit. This collection asks how to rise to the occasions that family presents and also how to let oneself spill over the bounds of familial roles.

      Venart's poems reach into the past but don't get lost there; they look the present in the face—they have to: the clock is ticking, the children calling, there are hot dogs to be sliced and the dog won't walk itself. The title is ironic. And also kind of secretly stoically hoping that it's not ironic. But it is:

      ?And now everyone is arrow
      arrow, arrows. Everyone harpoons.
      And I am the big heart, aren't I?
      When my black dog was being put down, in her last
      second I whispered, Squirrel.
      — "Epiphany"

      Bio

      Sarah Venart's poetry has been published in Numero Cinq, Concrete and River, The New Quarterly, The Malahat Review, The Fiddlehead, This Magazine, Prism International, and on CBC Radio. She is the author of Woodshedding (Brick Books, 2007) and Neither Apple Nor Pear. Sarah lives in Montreal and teaches writing at John Abbott College.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      2021 A. M. Klein Prize Jurors' Comments:

      "These are carefully made and deeply felt poems that enact a mind sifting through memory, pausing here and there to pick out the glinting details that will unsettle description into discovery."

      "A vulnerable and moving account of what it means to love and give care to others. The poems offer deeply observant reflections on their surroundings and circumstance. They are filled with love, but also longing for what is lost, or perhaps exiled, in the act of attending to others. These poems capture both the gifts and frustrations born out of sacrifice."

      "From start to finish, this collection is an absolute joy to read."

      "These poems span a moving gamut of experience and I found myself returning to them for their wit, wisdom, and dexterous craft."

      "I am in love with Sarah Venart's I Am the Big Heart. Everywhere is the work of the heart: a speaker full of deep empathy for the world, its charms, callousness, inconsistencies, and great beauty... A world where we live in deep fear and ecstatic longing for the destruction that happens to us all, the doing and undoing of existence, the existential pain of feeling?the incessant thud of being alive." — Dorothea Lasky

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    9781771315272 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:October 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 8.75 x 0.3 in | 166 gr | 65 pages Carton Quantity:7 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Precision-built poems that attempt CPR on their own irregular meter, on their own unreliable meaning.

      Vancouver poet Shaun Robinson's If You Discover a Fire is a debut collection of poems that make a virtue of their failure to communicate. They forage through the syntax and vocabulary of late-night voicemails, letters to the editor, songs invented in the shower, professional jargon, "Witness Wanted" signs, technical manuals, and text-message typos to assemble verbal collages that raise more questions than they answer. In settings ranging from Montreal's Mile End to a commercial flight above the Midwest to a wildfire in the mountains of British Columbia, these are poems rooted in working-class Canadian experience, poems that flirt with both safety and danger, that drone on like drunken strangers in a bar. Gathering reference from weather reports, football announcers, aerial disappearances, and the movie Groundhog Day, these poems sound their forlorn yawp through the alleys of East Vancouver.

      Out on the porch, between shots, he tells you
      things you've always known, how the past
      and the future are lovers spooning
      in bed, and the present is how they don't
      quite fit together
      — Carpe Dos and Carpe Don'ts (ft. Panda Bear)

      Bio

      Shaun Robinson's poetry has appeared in The Puritan, The Malahat Review, Prairie Fire, Poetry is Dead, and The Rusty Toque, and received Honourable Mention in ARC Magazine's 2018 Poem of the Year contest. Born in 100 Mile House, BC, Robinson has lived in Vancouver since 2006. He studied in UBC's Creative Writing MFA program, where he served as the poetry editor of PRISM international. He is also the author of the chapbook Manmade Clouds and currently works as an editor for the chapbook press Rahila's Ghost. If You Discover a Fire is his debut collection.

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      Awards
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      "In his tonally slippery, pithy, punchy and, by turns, irreverent and heartbreaking debut, If You Discover a Fire, Shaun Robinson creates a richly entropic world in which we find ourselves displaced along the fringes of modernity. Robinson recognizes the mind's drive to make of the present and past a trajectory that would propel us into the future and smartly frustrates the momentum with lyric aplomb, asking us to reconsider what we thought we were looking at." — Michael Prior, author of Model Disciple and Burning Province

      "Darkly comic, or just plain dark, these poems offers no assurances, but as the particulars accumulate—all-night gyms, boredom, plastic flowers, rec rooms where children in blindfolds swing wildly at air—they generate a vital, unpredictable force. Like the octopus that sets loose the lid of the jar it's been placed in, If You Discover A Fire has the imagination to outsmart the world's relentless conditions." — Sheryda Warrener, author of Hard Feelings and Floating Is Everything

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Accretion Irfan Ali Canada
    9781771315180 Paperback POETRY / Subjects & Themes Publication Date:April 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 8.75 x 0.3 in | 168 gr | 65 pages Carton Quantity:12 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2021 Trillium Book Award Shortlist

      An extraordinary debut set in Toronto, unfurling against the backdrop of an ancient Persian love story.

      The story of Layla and Majnun, made immortal by the Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi in the 12th century, has been retold thousands of times, in thousands of different ways, throughout literature. Against the backdrop of this story, to the sound-track of modern hip-hop, and amid the struggle of an immigrant family to instill an old faith under new conditions, Irfan Ali's Accretion hurtles towards an unsustainable, "greater madness." Majnun, one of the foundational literary characters who haunt Accretion, is also an Arabic epithet for "possessed." In this tradition, Ali has written a book from the places where the self is no longer the self; places where, in order not to shut down forever, the debris must be cleared, and the soul must inch towards love and hope, "on memory's dusty beams."

      Accretion is written in a contemporary lyricism that honours ancient poetic traditions. It is a familiar story, imbued with a particularity and honesty that only Irfan Ali could bring to the table.

      Bio

      Irfan Ali is a poet, essayist, writer, and educator. His short poetry collection, "Who I Think About When I Think About You" was shortlisted for the 2015 Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging Writers. Accretion is his first full-length work. Irfan was born, raised, and still lives in Toronto.

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      Awards
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      Accretion, Irfan Ali's triumph of a debut, masterfully unravels the third culture experience with deceiving simplicity, humour, grace and candour. Standing at the threshold of what it means to be a son, a South Asian man, a Muslim, and a human, Ali resists the temptation of binaries—faith is not linear, identity is not fixed, and culture is not singular. Ali's genius lies in his effortless ability to hold space for what is unsaid and unknown. Like Majnun from the famous Sufi fable, Ali sets out on a journey only to discover that his Beloved is the mirror within him." — Jury Citation, 2021 Trillium Book Award for Poetry

      "Irfan Ali delves fearlessly into the beauty and cruelty of a utilitarian city and the chasms between people. The struggle between head and heart binds these poems. In fact, Accretion might be considered a roadmap for finding love in everything—ourselves, family, soul mates, urban life, and faith." — Emily Pohl-Weary, author of Ghost Sick

  • 6
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    Glass Float Jane Munro Canada
    9781771315241 Paperback POETRY / Women Authors Publication Date:April 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 8.75 x 0.3 in | 196 gr | 83 pages Carton Quantity:60 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      Griffin Award-winner returns with new poems that are spacious with interiority, alive with a hard-earned lightness.

      Waves carried a glass float—designed to hold up a fishing net—across the Pacific. Beached it safely. Someone's breath is inside it.

      In Glass Float, her seventh collection, award-winning poet Jane Munro considers the widening of horizons that border and shape our lives, the familiarity and mystery of conscious experience, and the deepening awareness that comes with a dedicated practice such as yoga. This book is about connections: mind and body; self and others; physical and metaphysical; art and nature; west and east, north and south.

      In "Convexities," the book's opening poem, Munro quotes the grandfather who taught her to paint: "art is suggestion; art is not representation." No concavities, he said. Only the "little hummocks" that her pencil outlined as she did contour drawings. Munro's deft suggestion, her tracing of convexities, conveys underlying complexities, not by explication, but by looking with eyes and heart open to where mysteries almost surface.

      US

      bubbles
      says the baby, looking
      out the window at snowflakes

      the old man tears up

      two
      characteristics
      of the human animal—
      to speak, to weep

      both
      move me
      are you moved
      by words—by tears

      Bio

      Jane Munro's sixth poetry collection Blue Sonoma (Brick Books) won the 2015 Griffin Poetry Prize. A member of the collaborative poetry group Yoko's Dogs, she has been a professor of Creative Writing at several universities in BC, taught many informal writing workshops, and read her poetry to audiences across Canada. For more than twenty years, she has studied (in Canada and in India) and practiced Iyengar Yoga. In 2012, she moved back to Vancouver—where she grew up and raised her children—after spending twenty years living rurally on the coast of Vancouver Island.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      "Like glass floats themselves, these neat, clear poems contain Munro's breath. They cross oceans. Jane Munro's Glass Float—part travelogue, part journal, part meditation—picks up where Blue Sonoma ends: the speaker finds herself alone, at the live edge of her life. ? You are not merely called on to look at yourself but to 'receive your face.' A gift." — Ian Williams, author of Reproduction

  • 7
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    Bones Tyler Pennock Canada
    9781771315210 Paperback POETRY / American Publication Date:April 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 7.75 x 0.45 in | 250 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2020 Raymond Souster Award Longlist * 2021 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award Shortlist * 2021 Indigenous Voices Awards Shortlist

      Poems about a young two-spirit Indigenous man moving through shadow and trauma toward strength and awareness.

      Bones, Tyler Pennock's wise and arresting debut, is about the ways we process the traumas of our past, and about how often these experiences eliminate moments of softness and gentleness. Here, the poems journey inward, guided by the world of dreams, seeking memories of a loving sister lost beneath layers of tragedy and abuse. With bravery, the poems stand up to the demons lurking in the many shadows of their lines, seeking glimpses of a good that is always just out of reach.

      At moments heartrending and gut-punching, at others still and sweet, Bones is a collection of deep and painstaking work that examines the human spirit in all of us. This is a hero's journey and a stark look at the many conditions of the soul. This is a book for survivors, for fighters, for dreamers, and for believers.

      Bio

      Tyler Pennock is a Two-Spirit Queerdo from Faust, Alberta, and is a member of Sturgeon Lake Cree Nation. They were adopted from a Cree and Métis family, and reunited with them in 2006. Tyler is a graduate of Guelph University's Creative Writing MFA program (2013), as well as the University of Toronto (2009). They have lived in Toronto for the past 25 years. Bones is their first book.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      "Pennock's shifting, expansive book-length poem luminously reflects the scattered fragments of memory with language that fluiding mixes abstraction, reflection and recurrent imagery. Bones gradually unveils the pain and trauma that seeps through time and relations, in a way that mimics the heart's unveiling itself. His touchstones of Indigenous ceremony and ritual grounds the collection in a way that navigates the reader through a rich archeology of bones that are not merely relics, but oracles." — Jury Citation, 2021 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award

      "Here is a spare and urgent voice that speaks of 'wounds and beauty,' that gestures to a story of trauma and abuse while offering us a potent journey of self-reckoning and reclamation. Bones entwines brutality with the deepest tenderness and in its clear-eyed way asks us, as poetry must, to re-see the world." — Catherine Bush, author of Accusation and The Rules of Engagement

      "Tyler Pennock's poetry unfurls like breath: measured, light, caught, whispering, and vital. It charts memory with a steady hand and unerring allegiance to locating the 'beauty/in terrible things.' Bones addresses the effects of intergenerational, state-sponsored trauma with an enviable grace, inscribing and affirming life on the other side of overwhelming pain, abuse, and grief. It carries on, resilient, defiant, gazing at the stars, one breath at a time." — Laurie D. Graham, author of Settler Education

      "Tyler Pennock's Bones is a soft meandering through the memories of the narrator's hearthome: a place in which trauma, kinship, abuse, and nostalgia cradle one another in a circle. Here, poetics are deployed to inspect the most minute of objects with such wild abandon that the narrator transplants us into a world rife with sharpness so as to make the image complete, focussed, lifelike, photographic even as he continually 'wish[es he] were like water'. Here we find memory and dream animated in equal measure: two spirits sitting in a basement, a headless mother, a white bear, wihtiko, and a sister slowly vanishing. Lyrical, witty, heart-wrenching, and empowering, Pennock's debut book of poetry is a contemplative epic asking us to ponder the ethics of remembrance in all of its lacings of razing and revitalization." — Joshua Whitehead, author of Full-Metal Indigiqueer and Jonny Appleseed

  • 8
    catalogue cover
    9781771315517 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:May 01, 2021
    $20.00 CAD 5.8 x 8.6 x 0.42 in | 200 gr | 104 pages Carton Quantity:51 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      A deeply scouring poetic account of the residential school experience, and a deeply important indictment of colonialism in Canada.

      Many of the poems in Louise Halfe's Burning in This Midnight Dream were written in response to the grim tide of emotions, memories, dreams and nightmares that arose in her as the Truth and Reconciliation process unfolded. In heart-wrenching detail, Halfe recalls the damage done to her parents, her family, herself. With fearlessly wrought verse, Halfe describes how the experience of the residential schools continues to haunt those who survive, and how the effects pass like a virus from one generation to the next. She asks us to consider the damage done to children taken from their families, to families mourning their children; damage done to entire communities and to ancient cultures.

      Halfe's poetic voice soars in this incredibly moving collection as she digs deep to discover the root of her pain. Her images, created from the natural world, reveal the spiritual strength of her culture.

      Originally published in 2016 by Coteau Books, Burning in This Midnight Dream won the Indigenous Peoples' Publishing Award, the Rasmussen, Ramussen & Charowsky Indigenous Peoples' Writing Award, the Saskatchewan Arts Board Poetry Award, the League of Canadian Poets' Raymond Souster Award, and the High Plains Book Award for Indigenous Writers. It was also the 2017 WILLA Literacy Award Finalist in Poetry. This new edition includes a new Afterword by Halfe.

      Bio

      Louise Bernice Halfe — Sky Dancer was raised on Saddle Lake Reserve and attended Blue Quills Residential School. Her first book, Bear Bones & Feathers, received the 1996 Milton Acorn People's Poetry Award and was a finalist for the Spirit of Saskatchewan Award, the Pat Lowther Award, and the Gerald Lampert Award. Blue Marrow was a finalist for the 1998 Governor General's Award for Poetry. The Crooked Good won the First Peoples' Publishing Award and the Saskatoon Book Award in 2008 and was shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Award. Her fourth book, Burning in This Midnight Dream, won the 2017 Saskatchewan Book Award and the Raymond Souster Award, among numerous other awards. In 2018, as part of the Laurier Poetry Series, her previously published works were compiled in Sôhkêyihta: The Poetry of Sky Dancer Louise Bernice Halfe (edited by David Gaertner). Her latest book is awâsis — kinky and dishevelled. Halfe was Saskatchewan's Poet Laureate for 2005-2006, was awarded the Latner Writers Trust Award for her body of work in 2017, and was awarded the 2020 Kloppenburg Award for Literary Excellence. She trained at Nechi Institute as a facilitator, has a Bachelor of Social Work, was granted a lifetime membership in the League of Canadian Poets, and has received three honorary doctorates. In January of 2021, Louise was selected to be Canada's 9th Parliamentary Poet Laureate, serving until December 2022. She currently works with Elders in the organization Opikinawasowin ("raising our children") and lives on the Prairies with her husband, Peter.

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      Awards
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      "Burning in this Midnight Dream honours the witness of a singular experience, Halfe's experience, that many others of kin and clan experienced. Halfe descends into personal and cultural darkness with the care of a master story-teller and gives story voice to mourning. By giving voice to shame, confusion, injustice Halfe begins to reclaim a history. It is the start of a larger dialogue than what is contained in the pages." — Jury Citation, 2017 Raymond Souster Award

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    9781771315487 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:April 01, 2021
    $20.00 CAD 5.75 x 8.5 x 0.3 in | 168 gr | 72 pages Carton Quantity:59 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      Winner of the 2022 SK Arts Poetry Award Honouring Anne Szumigalski * 2022 High Plains Book Awards Finalist * 2022 Raymond Souster Award Shortlist * 2022 Pat Lowther Memorial Award Longlist * 2022/2023 First Nation Communities Read Awards Longlist

      A gender-fluid trickster character leaps from Cree stories to inhabit this racous and rebellious new work by award-winning poet Louise Bernice Halfe.

      There are no pronouns in Cree for gender; awâsis (which means illuminated child) reveals herself through shape-shifting, adopting different genders, exploring the English language with merriment, and sharing his journey of mishaps with humor, mystery, and spirituality. Opening with a joyful and intimate Introduction from Elder Maria Campbell, awâsis — kinky and dishevelled is a force of Indigenous resurgence, resistance, and soul-healing laughter.

      If you've read Halfe's previous books, prepared to be surprised by this one. Raging in the dark, uncovering the painful facts wrought on her and her people's lives by colonialism, racism, religion, and residential schools, she has walked us through raw realities with unabashed courage and intense, precise lyricism. But for her fifth book, another choice presented itself. Would she carve her way with determined ferocity into the still-powerful destructive forces of colonialism, despite Canada's official, hollow promises to make things better? After a soul-searching Truth and Reconciliation process, the drinking water still hasn't improved, and Louise began to wonder whether inspiration had deserted her.

      Then awâsis showed up—a trickster, teacher, healer, wheeler-dealer, shapeshifter, woman, man, nuisance, inspiration. A Holy Fool with their fly open, speaking Cree, awâsis came to Louise out of the ancient stories of her people, her Elders, from community input (through tears and laughter), from her own full heart and her three-dimensional dreams. Following awâsis's lead, Louise has flipped her blanket over, revealing a joking, mischievous, unapologetic alter ego—right on time.

      Bio

      Louise Bernice Halfe — Sky Dancer was raised on Saddle Lake Reserve and attended Blue Quills Residential School. Her first book, Bear Bones & Feathers, received the 1996 Milton Acorn People's Poetry Award and was a finalist for the Spirit of Saskatchewan Award, the Pat Lowther Award, and the Gerald Lampert Award. Blue Marrow was a finalist for the 1998 Governor General's Award for Poetry. The Crooked Good won the First Peoples' Publishing Award and the Saskatoon Book Award in 2008 and was shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Award. Her fourth book, Burning in This Midnight Dream, won the 2017 Saskatchewan Book Award and the Raymond Souster Award, among numerous other awards. In 2018, as part of the Laurier Poetry Series, her previously published works were compiled in Sôhkêyihta: The Poetry of Sky Dancer Louise Bernice Halfe (edited by David Gaertner). Her latest book is awâsis — kinky and dishevelled. Halfe was Saskatchewan's Poet Laureate for 2005-2006, was awarded the Latner Writers Trust Award for her body of work in 2017, and was awarded the 2020 Kloppenburg Award for Literary Excellence. She trained at Nechi Institute as a facilitator, has a Bachelor of Social Work, was granted a lifetime membership in the League of Canadian Poets, and has received three honorary doctorates. In January of 2021, Louise was selected to be Canada's 9th Parliamentary Poet Laureate, serving until December 2022. She currently works with Elders in the organization Opikinawasowin ("raising our children") and lives on the Prairies with her husband, Peter.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      "Louise Halfe knows, without question, how to make miyo-iskotêw, a beautiful fire with her kindling of words and moss gathered from a sacred place known only to her, to the Old Ones. These poems, sharp and crackling, are among one of the most beautiful fires I've ever sat beside." — Gregory Scofield, author of Witness, I Am

      "Louise makes awâsis out of irreverent sacred text. The darkness enlightens. She uses humor as a scalpel and sometimes as a butcher knife, to cut away, or hack off, our hurts, our pain, our grief and our traumas. In the end we laugh and laugh and laugh." — Harold R. Johnson, author of Peace and Good Order: The Case for Indigenous Justice in Canada

      "This is all about Indigenizing and reconciliation among ourselves. It's the kind of funny, shake up, poking, smacking and farting we all need while laughing our guts out. It's beautiful, gentle and loving." — Maria Campbell, author of Halfbreed

      "There really isn't any template for telling stories as experienced from within Indigenous minds. In her book awâsis — kinky and dishevelled, Cree poet Louise Bernice Halfe — Skydancer presents a whole new way to experience story poems. It's kinda like she writes in English but thinks in Cree. Lovely, revealing, funny, stunning. A whole new way to write!" — Buffy Sainte-Marie

  • 10
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    Grey All Over Andrea Actis Canada
    9781771315395 Paperback POETRY / Subjects & Themes Publication Date:April 01, 2021
    $22.95 CAD 5.8 x 8.5 x 0.5 in | 310 gr | 172 pages Carton Quantity:22 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2022 ReLit Awards Longlist

      "Please stay with me, please stay here, please cause poltergeists in my stupid apartment?"

      Late in the evening of December 13, 2007, Andrea Actis found her father, Jeff, facedown dead in her East Vancouver apartment. So began her passage through grief, self-reckoning, and graduate school in Providence, Rhode Island, where the poetics she studied (and sometimes repudiated) became integral to her gradual reconstruction of wholeness. An assemblage of "evidence" recovered from emails about paranormal encounters sent and received by Jeff ([email protected]), junk mail from false prophets, an annotated excerpt from Laura (Riding) Jackson's "The Serious Angels: A True Story," and transcripts of Actis' dreams, conversations, and messages to the dead, Grey All Over not only celebrates a rare, close, complicated father-daughter bond, it also boldly expands the empathetic and critical capacities of poetry itself. In pulling us outside the comfort zones of received aesthetics and social norms, Actis asks us to embrace with whole seriousness "the pragmatics of intuition" in all the ways we read, live, and love.

      Bio

      Andrea Actis was born in Toronto but for most of her life has lived in Vancouver on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. She teaches writing and literature at Capilano University and from 2015 to 2017 edited The Capilano Review. Grey All Over is her first book.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "When a loved one dies, there's all this stuff to deal with, and in the midst of grief we begin to collect, sort, document, store, and discard. Andrea Actis has taken the stuff surrounding her father's death and created a book that is, like grief, in turns heartbreaking, wise, chaotic, drunk, wry, and always unflinchingly honest. This powerful testament of survival is for anyone who has felt the 'déjà vu in reverse' of grief. It is for the living." — Sachiko Murakami, author of Render

      "Love letter, experimental poem, meditation, conversation with the dead—Andrea Actis's compelling debut is unlike any memoir I've ever read. In one passage, Actis digs out the biggest piece of bone she can find in the vessel of her father's ashes and gently bites on it. Reading Grey All Over I had a similar sensation. Ash. Bone. Love." — Jen Currin, author of Hider/Seeker

      "This absolutely beautiful work makes plain that seriousness feels like love." — Aisha Sasha John, author of I have to live.

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