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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Series: Field Notes
    On Property Policing, Prisons, and the Call for Abolition Rinaldo Walcott Canada
    9781771964074 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Race & Ethnic Relations Publication Date:February 02, 2021
    $14.95 CAD 4.5 x 7.75 x 0.32 in | 90 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:150 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Nominated for the Heritage Toronto Book Award • Longlisted for the Toronto Book Awards • A Globe and Mail Book of the Year • A CBC Books Best Canadian Nonfiction of 2021

      From plantation rebellion to prison labour's super-exploitation, Walcott examines the relationship between policing and property.

      That a man can lose his life for passing a fake $20 bill when we know our economies are flush with fake money says something damning about the way we’ve organized society. Yet the intensity of the calls to abolish the police after George Floyd’s death surprised almost everyone. What, exactly, does abolition mean? How did we get here? And what does property have to do with it? In On Property, Rinaldo Walcott explores the long shadow cast by slavery’s afterlife and shows how present-day abolitionists continue the work of their forebears in service of an imaginative, creative philosophy that ensures freedom and equality for all. Thoughtful, wide-ranging, compassionate, and profound, On Property makes an urgent plea for a new ethics of care.

      Bio
      Rinaldo Walcott is a Professor in the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. His research is in the area of Black Diaspora Cultural Studies, gender and sexuality.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for On Property

      “Masterful. A powerful tract … Rinaldo Walcott’s gift is that he makes what seems preposterous to most seem like common sense: abolish property as a completion of abolishing slavery as a means to solving the savagery of modern policing. A mad idea? Perhaps, but I found it hard to argue with his logic. As the Rastafari would say: bun Babylon!”—Globe and Mail

      “A clear-eyed assessment of the links between property, policing, and the subjugation of Black people ... Walcott’s analysis of the ways in which white supremacy is baked into the legal systems of Canada and the U.S. is stimulating. Progressives will embrace this well-conceived call for change.”—Publishers Weekly

      "[A]n eye-opening sequence of ideas in coolly passionate prose."—Mark Abley, The Walrus

      “Running a brief but far-reaching and punchy 96 pages, On Property has an absolute certainty of purpose: calling for the abolition of private property ownership ... [If] statements such as ‘the problem of property is resolved through its removal’ or calls to ‘abolish everything’ can make some people quake, when Walcott’s pamphlet argues for the human ability to reconsider and rebuild societal structures, the stances come across as sensible and, better yet, doable.”Toronto Star

      "Rinaldo Walcott locates his contribution to the Field Notes series on current issues, On Property, in the present political moment, while using historical references and events to argue for the abolition of police and property ... Walcott concludes his case by asking for a new ethics of care and economy that does not keep feeding into the incarceration system, a system rigged to continue Black suffering ... It is a question we must ask ourselves after reflecting on the ways in which we, too, are complicit."Quill & Quire

      “Urgent, far-reaching and with a profound generosity of care, the wisdom in On Property is absolute. We cannot afford to ignore or defer its teachings. Now is the time for us-collectively-to take up the challenge in this undeniable gift of a book.”—Canisia Lubrin, author of The Dyzgraphxst and Voodoo Hypothesis

      “Provocative and persuasive. Rinaldo Walcott’s insightful unmasking of the historic baggage associated with private property challenges us to face up to what might be the source of our most pressing social problems.”—Cecil Foster, author of They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters and the Birth of Modern Canada

      "Rinaldo Walcott is one of the most renowned and dynamic articulators of the Black radical tradition. His writings are essential for anyone seeking deeper engagement with the social and political movements urgently afoot today."—David Chariandy, author of Brother and I've Been Meaning to Tell You

      Praise for Rinaldo Walcott

      “Essential reading. From its first paragraphs Rinaldo Walcott's The Long Emancipation shifts the axis of thought about Black freedom. The astonishing and devastating idea at the center of this book lays out the condition of Black being in the Americas as existing, still, in a state of juridical unfreedom. Once that idea's recalibrating weight and urgency strike you, you must think again where analysis and theory begin. You must begin again.”—Dionne Brand, poet, novelist, essayist

      “In The Long Emancipation Rinaldo Walcott has opened up whole new avenues for thinking about the causes and conditions, the global logics of ‘unfreedom’ that continue to haunt and imperil Black lives. This rich collection of provocations challenges us to consider the terms and possibilities of living beyond the death zones and extractive economies of capitalism; it invites us to see and feel the audacious eruptions of a blackness exceeding these limits—moving and struggling toward freedom.”—Deborah E. McDowell, University of Virginia

      “Each chapter of BlackLife carefully weaves together analyses of history, philosophy, policy, art, and activism to create a fuller picture of Black Canadian existence.”Briarpatch Magazine

      Black Life: Post-BLM and the Struggle For Freedom is a short volume, but one of the most important intellectual interventions to emerge in Canada in recent years. It ought to be required reading in Canadian Studies and other social science and arts courses at both secondary and post-secondary levels across the country. Above all, it ought to be taken seriously by those—especially white Canadians—with the ability to apply its insights in public policy and private lives alike.”—Rhea Rollmann at PopMatters

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    We All Go Back to the Land The Who, Why, and How of Land Acknowledgements Suzanne Keeptwo Canada
    9781550598674 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Indigenous Studies Publication Date:February 03, 2021
    $24.95 CAD 0.8 x 7.5 x 5.5 in | 350 gr | 432 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Brush Education
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Report in 2015, Land or Territorial Acknowledgments have been sweeping the nation. Academic conferences, government press conferences, cultural events, and even hockey games now often begin with an acknowledgment of the Original Peoples of the lands they are situated upon.  Initially, Land Acknowledgments may have made an impact as most Canadians didn’t know which Indigenous Land base their suburb or city or town was built upon, but most acknowledgements now have a standardized, token feel to them.

      Suzanne Keeptwo, an Indigenous artist and educator, wants to reinvigorate the Land Acknowledgement as a way for Original Peoples to celebrate and honor their ancestors’ relationship to the Land. Indigenous Codes of Ethics in place at the point of European contact informs this foundational guide for contemporary Land Acknowledgments. Examining Principles of Sharing, Gift Exchange, Customs of the Trade, Host and Guest protocols and differing worldviews provide insight into our current relationship with the Land, whether it's political, environmental or commercial. Suzanne also delves into the sensitivities of identity politics, self-identification protocols, traditional leadership and how to uphold our Original Agreement with the Land.
      Bio
      Suzanne Keeptwo, Métis (Algonkin/French and Irish) of Québec, is both an artist and professional educator who merges traditional Anishinaabe Teachings and artistic expression to inform others about Indigenous historical truths and contemporary realities. She has worked across the country as a professional facilitator with host clients that include the Museum of Human Rights, McGill University, Full Circle: First Nations Performance, and the College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists of the Royal Society of Canada. Suzanne is also a freelance writer, editor, and consultant, with expertise is bridging cultural gaps of understanding between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.
      Marketing & Promotion
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  • 3
    catalogue cover
    How to Fail as a Popstar Vivek Shraya Canada, Brendan Healy Canada
    9781551528427 Paperback DRAMA / Canadian Publication Date:February 18, 2021
    $18.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.25 in | 210 gr | 72 pages Carton Quantity:75 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The first play by multi-media artist Vivek Shraya, about fame and personal transformation.

      Described as "cultural rocket fuel" by Vanity Fair, Vivek Shraya is a multi-media artist whose art, music, novels, and poetry and children's books explore the beauty and the power of personal and cultural transformation. How to Fail as a Popstar is Vivek's debut theatrical work, a one-person show that chronicles her journey from singing in shopping malls to "not quite" pop music superstardom with beguiling humor and insight. A reflection on the power of pop culture, dreams, disappointments, and self-determination, this astonishing work is a raw, honest, and hopeful depiction of the search to find one's authentic voice.

      The book includes colour photographs from the show's 2020 production in Toronto, and a foreword by its director Brendan Healy.

      Bio

      Vivek Shraya is an artist whose body of work crosses the boundaries of music, literature, visual art, theatre, and film. Her books include I'm Afraid of Men, The Subtweet, even this page is white, She of the Mountains, Death Threat, and The Boy & the Bindi, and her album with Queer Songbook Orchestra, Part-Time Woman, was nominated for the Polaris Music Prize. She is one half of the music duo Too Attached and the founder of the Arsenal Pulp Press imprint VS. Books. A six-time Lambda Literary Award finalist, Vivek was a Pride Toronto Grand Marshal, was featured on The Globe and Mail's Best Dressed list, and has received honours from the Writers' Trust of Canada and the Publishing Triangle. She is a director on the board of the Tegan and Sara Foundation and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Calgary.



      Brendan Healy is a theater director whose credits include the premiere production of Vivek Shraya's How to Fail as a Popstar at Canadian Stage in Toronto in 2020. He is a regular instructor at the National Theatre School of Canada.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Shraya may not have reached the top echelon of pop stardom, but sharing her persistence and self-discovery just might be a bigger gift. After all, these are the stories we rarely hear told. -NOW Magazine


      It's a moving tale that any person who's struggled to achieve their dreams can easily relate to, and Shraya has a certain magnetism to her performance that keeps the one-woman show moving fluidly. -Broadway World


      A funny, warm and honest show by a rare, 360-degree talent. -Denise Balkissoon, executive editor of Chatelaine Magazine


      The work of radical self-acceptance is so challenging I never want to do it. In this piece of art, Vivek's fearless vulnerability, steady gaze and sure hand creates another way in, an opening, and all I have to do is show up. Now it's your turn. Lucky you. -Elvira Kurt, teacup butch, comedy legend and writer for Canada's Drag Race


      Vivek Shraya's How to Fail as a Popstar is a maguffin - a demonstration of Shraya's virtuosity as a performer, a songwriter, and writer, and is anything but a failure. It is a cutting and hilarious look at the spark and afterglow of any musician entering the industry - the adolescence, adulthood, and moribundity of this creative life-within-a-life. She claims to not "have the range," but Popstar demonstrates the opposite - a multi-disciplinary artist at the height of her powers. -Owen Pallett, violinist and composer


      An important show from such an important artist. Everyone should see How to Fail as a Popstar! -Bif Naked, recording artist

  • 4
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    The Doll Nhung N. Tran-Davies Canada, Ravy Puth Canada
    9781772601657 Hardcover JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes Age (years) from 5 - 9, Grade (CAN) from 2 - 4, Grade (US) from 2 - 4, Reading age from 5 - 9 Publication Date:April 20, 2021
    $19.95 CAD 8.5 x 11 x 0.38 in | 400 gr | 24 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Second Story Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A young girl and her family arrive in an airport in a new country. They are refugees, migrants who have travelled across the world to find safety. Strangers greet them, and one of them gives the little girl a doll. Decades later, that little girl is grown up and she has the chance to welcome a group of refugees who are newly arrived in her adopted country. To the youngest of them, a little girl, she gives a doll, knowing it will help make her feel welcome. Inspired by real events.
      Bio

      Nhung N. Tran-Davies is a physician and advocate for social justice through education. Her family came to Canada as refugees from Vietnam in 1978. Nhung and her family live outside Edmonton, Alberta.



      Ravy Puth uses illustration to convey ideas of social action, convinced that art with a purpose is key to achieving impact and lasting significance. Born in Canada of Cambodian-Chinese parents, her work focuses on representations and cultural identities, that she explores through narratives of migration and feminism. She lives in Montreal, Quebec.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Blue Spruce 2022 Award 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews
      A touching, full-circle journey about the lasting impact of kindness.
      Good children’s literature serves as windows and mirrors. The Doll is exactly this kind of literature – children see themselves as well as others in the book.
      Nhung N. Tran-Davies tells her story in a gentle poetic text, using experiences as a child and matching them with the contemporary experiences of Syrian refugees.
      A wonderfully entertaining story for children ages 5-9 with an important underlying message about immigration, "The Doll" is especially and unreservedly recommended for family, elementary school, and community library picture book collections.

      "The illustrations and text form a riveting blend of kid-friendly perspectives with adult news stories but ultimately speak with one voice to say: small acts of kindness can challenge global issues of turmoil and injustice."

  • 5
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    9781250229588 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Mysteries & Detective Stories Age (years) from 13 - 18 On Sale Date:April 20, 2021 Print Run:50000
    $25.99 CAD 5.83 x 8.24 x 1.28 in | 450 gr | 384 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y Feiwel & Friends
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Suspenseful and richly atmospheric, June Hur's The Forest of Stolen Girls is a haunting historical mystery sure to keep readers guessing until the last page.

      1426, Joseon (Korea). Hwani's family has never been the same since she and her younger sister went missing and were later found unconscious in the forest near a gruesome crime scene.

      Years later, Detective Min?Hwani's father?learns that thirteen girls have recently disappeared from the same forest that nearly stole his daughters. He travels to their hometown on the island of Jeju to investigate? only to vanish as well.

      Determined to find her father and solve the case that tore their family apart, Hwani returns home to pick up the trail. As she digs into the secrets of the small village?and collides with her now estranged sister, Maewol?Hwani comes to realize that the answer could lie within her own buried memories of what happened in the forest all those years ago.

      Praise for The Forest of Stolen Girls:

      A Junior Library Guild Selection
      A 2022 Edgar Allan Poe Award Nominee
      A YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults Selection
      A 2022 White Pine Award Nominee
      A 2022 ALA Rise Selection
      A 2022 CCBC Choices Selection

      "The Forest of Stolen Girls is a haunting, breathtaking tale that will have readers on the edge of their seats. ... Hur is an absolute master of mystery, and I will be reading her gorgeous books for years to come." ?Adalyn Grace, New York Times-bestselling author of All the Stars and Teeth

      "Rich, exquisite, and deeply atmospheric, The Forest of Stolen Girls draws the reader in from the very first page and doesn't let go. A dark and utterly engrossing mystery, beautifully drawn from start to finish." ?Kathleen Glasgow, New York Times-bestselling author of Girl in Pieces

      "Haunting and lyrical. Beware, this tale will draw you deeper into the forest than you want to go." ?Stacey Lee, award-winning author of The Downstairs Girl

      "A brilliant historical fiction mystery that is suspenseful, gorgeous and absolutely riveting! Hur brings Jeju Island during the early Joseon period completely to life in a rich, evocative manner that reminds me of watching my favorite historical Kdrama.? ?Ellen Oh, author of the Prophecy series

      Bio
      June Hur was born in South Korea and raised in Canada, except for the time when she moved back to Korea and attended high school there. She studied History and Literature at the University of Toronto. She began writing her debut novel after obsessing over books about Joseon Korea. When she's not writing, she can be found wandering through nature or journaling at a coffee shop. June is the bestselling author of The Silence of Bones, The Forest of Stolen Girls and The Red Palace, and currently lives in Toronto with her husband and daughter.
      Marketing & Promotion
        - starred review from School Library Journal
        - Canadian author, June Hur lives in Toronto
        - Publishers Weekly review

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Edgar Allan Poe Award Nominee 2022, Nominated
      Reviews

      Praise for The Forest of Stolen Girls:

      A Junior Library Guild Selection
      A 2022 Edgar Allan Poe Award Nominee
      A YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults Selection
      A 2022 White Pine Award Nominee
      A 2022 ALA Rise Selection
      A 2022 CCBC Choices Selection

      "A breathtaking journey through 1400s Korea. ... The mystery complements the setting perfectly, and the conclusion is well-plotted and satisfying. ... A must for all collections." ?School Library Journal, starred review

      "Crafting a suspenseful, atmospheric historical mystery, Hur (The Silence of Bones) explores women?s lack of bodily agency during this time and the dangers of obsessive protection, adroitly interweaving the historical context of the real horrors that afflicted Korean women from the 13th-century Mongol rule until after 1435." ?Publishers Weekly

      "Set against the backdrop of fifteenth-century Korea?or Joseon, as it was known then?this tightly plotted historical mystery will please fans of both genres. ... Those who love well-researched historical fiction with darker themes such as Ruta Sepetys? Out of the Easy or Elizabeth Wein?s Verity series, will appreciate Hur?s attention to detail. Give to fans of Sherri L. Smith?s The Blossom and the Firefly or Stacy Lee?s Downstairs Girl looking for other well developed Asian characters." ?YALSA

      "Rich, exquisite, and deeply atmospheric, The Forest of Stolen Girls draws the reader in from the very first page and doesn't let go. A dark and utterly engrossing mystery, beautifully drawn from start to finish." ?Kathleen Glasgow, New York Times-bestselling author of Girl in Pieces

      "The Forest of Stolen Girls is a haunting, breathtaking tale that will have readers on the edge of their seats. With its lush and atmospheric prose, complex character dynamics, and an immersive mystery I was ravenous to uncover, I could not turn the pages fast enough! Hur is an absolute master of mystery, and I will be reading her gorgeous books for years to come." ?Adalyn Grace, New York Times-bestselling author of All the Stars and Teeth

      "Haunting and lyrical. Beware, this tale will draw you deeper into the forest than you want to go." ?Stacey Lee, award-winning author of The Downstairs Girl

      "A brilliant historical fiction mystery that is suspenseful, gorgeous and absolutely riveting! Hur brings Jeju Island during the early Joseon period completely to life in a rich, evocative manner that reminds me of watching my favorite historical Kdrama. ... I adored this book from start to finish!? ?Ellen Oh, author of the Prophecy series

      "Knee-deep inside Hur's taut, suspenseful snare, I felt the cold touch of secrets poking at my shoulder and sometimes, neck. Disappearances, quests, and family tension? I'm all the way in." ?Rita Williams-Garcia, National Book Award finalist New York Times-bestselling author of A Sitting in St. James

      Praise for The Silence of Bones:

      ABA Indies Introduce Selection
      Junior Library Guild Selection
      A 2021 Edgar Allan Poe Award Nominee
      A 2021 ALA Rise Selection
      2020 Freeman Award Honorable Mention
      A 2021 CCBC Amy Mathers Teen Book Award Finalist

      "At once haunting and evocative, June Hur's The Silence of Bones is a gorgeous, tightly-woven debut. Prepare to delve deep into the lush and dangerous world of Korea in the 1800's for a page-turner you won't soon forget." ?Hafsah Faizal, New York Times-bestselling author of We Hunt the Flame

      "An intriguing tale that touches on class, honor, the value of one's beliefs, and the lengths one is willing to go for loyalty and family. Hur presents such a vivid portrayal of the Joseon Era that it's like stepping back in time. With its breathtaking prose and complex characters, this mystery novel is sure to keep you guessing until the very end!" ?Kat Cho, author of Wicked Fox

      "This gripping drama is definitely one you're not going to want to miss." ?Buzzfeed

      "A total knockout." ?Popsugar

      "Gripping ... An exhilarating thriller, pitting the powerful against the power-hungry, endowing the powerless with affecting agency." ?Shelf Awareness

      "This book is beautifully written, and moves at a brisk pace. ... Engaging and dynamic. Hur?s first novel does an excellent job of exploring a topic that isn?t found widely in YA literature." ?School Library Journal

      "The Korean concept of han, as well as customs, language, and politics, are woven flawlessly into the narrative ... Seol?s determined pursuit of literacy and freedom, as well as the bittersweet ending, make for a memorable and worthwhile read." ?Publishers Weekly

      "In this striking debut, Hur has crafted an intriguing historical mystery set in a time period often overlooked in YA ... A compelling mystery for lovers of Victorian murder cases who are ready for an alternative to the London setting." ?Booklist

      "An excellent historical mystery that asks big questions about family, religion, morality, and what it means to belong." ?Book Riot

      "Read this book if you enjoy: supporting debut authors, Korean history, the 1800s, atmospheric reads, K-drama dramatics, books in which you start suspecting everyone." ?Goodreads

      "A fantastic debut from Hur, who writes a captivating story that keeps readers guessing and expertly explains the complex political climate ... The female characters? courage, ingenuity and warrior hearts are inspiring, and the story that reveals them is entrancing." ?The Canadian Children's Book Centre

      "I was struck by the depth of this gripping story. ... The meditative quality of the narration of this historical mystery felt perfectly suited to the Korean setting and the backdrop of political and religious struggles. Seol?s courage, curiosity, and dedication make her a character I can?t get enough of." ?Tegan Tigani, Queen Anne Book Company

      "The Silence of Bones is a historic and richly atmospheric mystery that is utterly unique and difficult to put down! ... Mesmerizing." ?Sarah True, Joseph-Beth Booksellers

  • 6
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    Green Glass Ghosts Rae Spoon Canada, Gem Hall Canada
    9781551528380 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / LGBTQ+ Age (years) from 14 Publication Date:May 04, 2021
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.6 in | 340 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      From writer and musician Rae Spoon: a rollicking yet introspective young adult adventure about screwing up, finding yourself, and forging a new life on your own.

      At age nineteen in the year 2000, the queer narrator of Green Glass Ghosts steps off a bus on Granville Street in downtown Vancouver, a city where the faceless condo towers of the wealthy loom over the streets to of the east side where folks are just trying to get by, against the deceptively beautiful backdrop of snow-capped mountains and sparkling ocean.

      Armed with only their guitar and their voice, our hopeful hero arrives on the West Coast at the beginning of the new millennium and on the cusp of adulthood, fleeing a traumatic childhood in an unsafe family plagued by religious extremism, mental health crises, and abuse in a conservative city not known for accepting difference. They're eager to build a better life among like-minded folks, and before they know it, they've got a job, an apartment, openly non-binary friends, and a new queer love, dancing, busking, and making out in bars, parks, art spaces, and apartments. But their search for belonging and stability is disrupted by excessive drinking, jealousy, and painful memories of the past, distracting the protagonist from their ultimate goal of playing live music and spurring them to an emotional crisis. If they can't learn to care for themselves, how will they ever find true connection and community?

      The haunting illustrations by Gem Hall conjure the moody, misty urban landscape and represent a deep collaboration with the author based on their shared experience of seeking safety, authenticity, and acceptance on the West Coast. Green Glass Ghosts is an evocation of that delicate, aching moment between youth and adulthood when we are trying, and often failing, to become the person we dream ourselves to be.

      Bio

      Rae Spoon is a non-binary musician, producer, and author from Treaty 7 (Calgary) living on Lekwungen territory (Victoria). Rae is the author of the Lambda Literary Award finalist First Spring Grass Fire (2012), and co-author (with Ivan Coyote) of Gender Failure (2014). Rae was awarded a Dayne Ogilvie Prize Honour of Distinction by the Writers' Trust of Canada. They are the subject of a National Film Board documentary entitled My Prairie Home (2013), which screened at film festivals internationally, including the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. They have released ten albums for which they have been nominated for two Polaris Prizes and a Western Canada Music award. They are the founder of Coax Records, dedicated to work by marginalized musicians traditionally underrepresented in the music industry.



      Gem Hall is an itinerant interdisciplinary artist of mixed Romani/British heritage currently based on Coast Salish lands. Gem is interested in creative work as a means of survival and language to express stories & songs of resilience, recovery, diaspora, and the magic of storytelling and witnessing. With a background in DIY/zine culture & queer and trans community organizing, they use illustration, textile work, writing, harp playing, tarot reading, and plant medicines to hold liminal spaces between worlds and ways of being.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Glass Ghosts is hopeful and raw in its honest depiction of how survivors experience and interface through their filters, the cautionary tale of 'medicine' becoming poison, how we sometimes need to be taught self-care, patiently by loving Others, those surrogate strangers, gently moving us toward trust, as we imperfectly seek stability on an ever-shifting coastline. -Imogen Di Sapia, associate member, European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture (ERIAC); writer/textile artist (The Selkie: Weaving and the Wild Feminine)


      Lonely and spectral and hopeful. A book about being young and queer. About trying to find community, create a home, and stay in the world despite old trauma and new harms in the places you seek safety. A tether for when you feel yourself floating away. -Jaime Burnet, musician (Sockfoot), writer (Crocuses Hatch from Snow)


      This book is wild and familiar, not unlike young queer lust, love, or existence. It perfectly encapsulates the balances between being wide-eyed and resourceful, running away and running to. Spoon and Hall clearly know that survival is a messy landscape, with as many hands pulling you down as there are lifting you up. Reading this book is being lifted up, a firm reminder of still being here. -Tara-Michelle Ziniuk, editor (THIS Magazine), writer (Whatever, Iceberg, Somewhere to Run From, Emergency Contact)


      Green Glass Ghosts chronicles the realities of queer protagonists navigating love, health, addiction, and healing in Vancouver on the cusp of the new millennium. The chaos in survival is documented by Rae Spoon's iconically poetic prose and illustrated by Gem Hall's bold yet haunting ink drawings. Green Glass Ghosts walks us through both the grit and camaraderie of underworld subcultures, with art and storytelling that doesn't alienate but encourages us to normalize our disarray. -Cristy Road Carrera, author of Next World Tarot, Spit and Passion, and Choked Up


      Rae Spoon and Gem Hall's Green Glass Ghosts documents a time that hasn't been written much about, and needs to be - a particular kind of working-class, queer/trans kid life in early 2000s Vancouver. Spoon and Hall craft a portrait of the many kinds of ghosts - of trauma, colonization, and displacement - in that place and time, and the messy, persisting dollar pizza-eating queer and trans kids trying to get by and make something different, even if we don't know how. Hall's artwork does a beautiful job of capturing this place and all the beings on both sides of the veil who inhabit this queer space of becoming. -Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha, author of Care Work and Dirty River


      Green Glass Ghosts is a compelling coming-of-age story that is so specific and yet so universal. Every queer and trans person will recognize themselves, their friends, someone they've known, loved, and lost in this novel. The collaboration between Gem Hall and Rae Spoon is tender, haunting, raw, honest, asking of us to not only look back at our past selves but also dream up different possibilities for our future. This is a book to hold in our hearts. -Kama La Mackerel, author of ZOM-FAM

  • 7
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    9781770464377
  • 8
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    What Was Said to Me The Life of Sti'tum'atul'wut, a Cowichan Woman Ruby Peter Canada, Helene Demers Canada, Molly Peter Canada
    9780772679383 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date:June 18, 2021
    $24.95 CAD 152 x 228 x 14 mm | 380 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Royal BC Museum
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A narrative of resistance and resilience spanning seven decades in the life of a tireless advocate for Indigenous language preservation.

      Life histories are a form of contemporary social history and convey important messages about identity, cosmology, social behaviour and one’s place in the world. This first-person oral history—the first of its kind ever published by the Royal BC Museum—documents a period of profound social change through the lens of Sti’tum’atul’wut—also known as Mrs. Ruby Peter—a Cowichan elder who made it her life’s work to share and safeguard the ancient language of her people: Hul’q’umi’num’.

      Over seven decades, Sti’tum’atul’wut mentored hundreds of students and teachers and helped thousands of people to develop a basic knowledge of the Hul’q’umi’num’ language. She contributed to dictionaries and grammars, and helped assemble a valuable corpus of stories, sound and video files—with more than 10,000 pages of texts from Hul’q’umi’num’ speakers—that has been described as “a treasure of linguistic and cultural knowledge.” Without her passion, commitment and expertise, this rich legacy of material would not exist for future generations.

      In 1997 Vancouver Island University anthropologist Helene Demers recorded Sti’tum’atul’wut’s life stories over nine sessions. She prepared the transcripts for publication in close collaboration with Sti’tum’atul’wut' and her family. The result is rich with family and cultural history—a compelling narrative of resistance and resilience that promises to help shape social policy for generations.


      Bio
      Sti’tum’atul’wut Ruby Peter is a Cowichan Elder and linguist who has trained Hul’q’umi’num’ language teachers and researchers for over six decades. She is the lead language consultant on five SSHRC grants on Hul’q’umi’num’ stories and four Partnership Development Grants on narrative and discourse structure, pronunciation, the language of canoe culture and Hul’q’umi’num’ theatre. Ruby serves on boards, panels and committees that set policies and provide linguistic support for language revitalization efforts in her community. In 2019 she was awarded honorary doctorate degrees by the University of Victoria and Simon Fraser University. She is the associate editor of The Cowichan Dictionary.

      Helene Demers is a Dutch-Canadian cultural anthropologist and a research associate at Vancouver Island University. Her research in the Cowichan Valley spans 30 years and includes recording life histories, The Cowichan Valley Community Oral History Project: The Meaning of Home and assisting in the repatriation of a Cowichan Sxwuyxw mask. As an immigrant, she is deeply aware of the interconnection between identity and place, and this thread runs through her research. Currently, she is researching “home artifacts,” the items that immigrants and refugees bring from their homeland, as well as documenting journeys and migrations through a collaborative embroidery project.

      Molly Peter is a daughter, grandmother and great-grandmother from Cowichan Tribes territory. She has worked in Cowichan Tribes Child and Family Services for over 26 years. Like her mother, Ruby Peter, she has shared the importance of cultural teachings, values and beliefs with her offspring and community members.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "What an honour it was to read the words of Sti'tum'atul'wut. As I read What was Said to Me I felt like I was sitting with my grandmother when she too shared stories, teachings, culture and tradition. I giggled, I laughed, sometimes I felt a bit angry--but more importantly, I heard the narrative of resistance and renewal. Such a beautiful reflection of Ruby's vision: to leave a legacy that guides and directs her family--to be honourable."--Robina Thomas, Executive Director, Indigenous Academic and Community Engagement, University of Victoria

      "What Was Said to Me is a beautiful and generous gift our Aunty, Sti'tum'atul'wut, has shared with us. It is rich with teachings from beginning to end. It is an example of the love she had for the people. What Was Said to Me will be echoed for generations to come."--Samaya Jardey, Director of Language and Cultural Affairs, Squamish Nation

      "With sensitivity and honesty, Ruby Peter brings to life the cultural training and protocols that have sustained her Cowichan community for generations. A synthesis of memoir, oral history and auto-ethnography, her story is a powerful testament to the persistence of Indigenous life on Canada's West Coast." --Wendy Wickwire, author of At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

      ?The stories contained in this book are wonderful reminders about the centrality of care, and of listening, for a life well-lived. . . Its lessons are Cowichan and invaluable to all who want to live an honorable, and ethical life.? ?Georgia Sitara, for BC Studies

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    9781551528564 Paperback FICTION / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:September 12, 2021
    $21.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.8 in | 410 gr | 278 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize

      Award-winning novelist Casey Plett (Little Fish) returns with a poignant suite of stories that center transgender women.

      Casey Plett's 2018 novel Little Fish won a Lambda Literary Award, the Firecracker Award for Fiction, and the Amazon First Novel Award. Her latest work, A Dream of a Woman, is her first book of short stories since her seminal 2014 collection A Safe Girl to Love. Centering transgender women seeking stable, adult lives, A Dream of a Woman finds quiet truths in prairie high-rises and New York warehouses, in freezing Canadian winters and drizzly Oregon days.

      In "Hazel and Christopher," two childhood friends reconnect as adults after one of them has transitioned. In "Perfect Places," a woman grapples with undesirability as she navigates fetish play with a man. In "Couldn't Hear You Talk Anymore," the narrator reflects on her tumultuous life and what might have been as she recalls tender moments with another trans woman.

      An ethereal meditation on partnership, sex, addiction, romance, groundedness, and love, the stories in A Dream of a Woman buzz with quiet intensity and the intimate complexities of being human.

      Bio

      Casey Plett is the author of the novel Little Fish and the short story collections A Dream of a Woman and A Safe Girl to Love; co-editor of the anthology Meanwhile, Elsewhere: Science Fiction and Fantasy from Transgender Writers; and the publisher at LittlePuss Press. She wrote a column on transitioning for McSweeney's Internet Tendency and her essays and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, Maclean's, The Walrus, Plenitude, the Winnipeg Free Press, and other publications. She is the winner of two Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Fiction, winner of the Amazon Canada First Novel Award, and she received an Honour of Distinction from The Writers' Trust of Canada's Dayne Ogilvie Prize for LGBTQ Emerging Writers. She lives in Windsor, Ontario.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Scotiabank Giller Prize 2021, Long-listed
      Publishing Triangle Award for Trans and Gender-Variant Literature 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Plett tells beautiful stories of trans women as they exist in the world: tangible, fallible, tender and hardened. -Xtra


      Casey Plett transports the reader from Pilot Mound, Manitoba, to Portland, Oregon, and back, tying together alternating perspectives and places with direct and detailed prose that's both heart-rending and heartwarming. -Chatelaine


      I've always admired Plett's ability to capture the tenderest and most complicated intimacies between characters. Exploring addiction, loss, consent, and shifting desires, each story in her extraordinary new collection is somehow even more tender and emotionally complex than the last. - Megan Milks, The Rumpus


      In A Dream of a Woman, connecting to yourself and the world doesn't seem to come from checking in with yourself and your body again and again. It comes from losing yourself in another and in the process, stumbling along the way into a closer relationship with your body and the world. -Maisonneuve


      Plett's voice is strong and fully realized in this collection. The language is tight and matter-of-fact, but also beautiful and sweeping in a way that makes you forget it's there. Plett wields language masterfully to share many vastly different trans experiences with readers. -Prairie Fire


      Plett has a characteristic style that manages to merge tenderness with Prairie toughness - a style on display in these stories of trans women seeking something - groundedness, maybe, but that dreamlike quality of desire, too. -The Globe and Mail ("The Globe 100")


      Plett's trademark skills at authentic characterization, evocative setting, and insight into the lives of trans women are on full display in this superb collection of short stories. The stories crackle with quiet complexity as they cover topics like a woman returning to her Mennonite roots while visiting a lover and another leaving the Portland's queer utopia to transition in New York's anonymity. -Autostraddle ("Best Queer Books of the Year")


      A Dream of a Woman is Plett's best work to date and reminds us that she is one of our finest writers. There is something powerfully intimate about the voices of the characters paired with the matured texture of the prose. Told with exquisite beauty and a lack of pretense, these emotionally vibrant stories come alive in their quiet moments. -Literary Review of Canada


      Both bittersweet and beautiful, Plett writes perfectly imperfect characters that make you feel less alone. -The Independent (UK)

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    Chaiwala! Priti Birla Maheshwari Canada, Ashley Barron Canada
    9781771473682 Hardcover JUVENILE FICTION / Cooking & Food Age (years) from 3 - 7, Grade (CAN) from 2, Grade (US) from 2 Publication Date:October 15, 2021
    $18.95 CAD 8.25 x 8.25 x 0.38 in | 313 gr | 24 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Owlkids
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A sensory celebration of family, food, and culture


      When their train makes a 10-minute stop at the station in Jaipur, a young girl and her mother hurry to get in line for a cup of chai. While the girl waits for her mug of milky spiced tea, readers are treated to the sights, sounds, and smells of the Chaiwala’s cart. The aroma of ginger, cardamom, cloves, and cinnamon sticks swirls in the air. Tea leaves rustle, milk bubbles, and the hot drink is poured back and forth until—clink!—the cups are filled and placed on the stand. With a biscuit and a rusk added to their order, it’s time to find a spot to sit and enjoy!


      Inspired by the author’s childhood visits to India, Chaiwala! celebrates the pleasures of taking time for food, family, and tradition—even for a brief moment. Illustrated in lively cut-paper collages and filled with scrumptious sensory details, this book is just like a cup of chai—warm, comforting, and good to the last drop.

      Bio

      PRITI BIRLA MAHESHWARI was born in New Delhi, India. She moved to Canada when she was six years old and has also lived in the United States. A teacher for more than 20 years, Priti lives with her husband and daughter in Cambridge, Ontario. Priti savors the tender moments and conversation that happen when people connect over a cup of chai. Chaiwala! is her first picture book.



      ASHLEY BARRON studied illustration at the Ontario College of Art & Design. She has since illustrated a number of books with Owlkids and Kids Can Press. Ashley shares a studio with her partner and three cats in Toronto, Ontario.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      A Loan Stars Jr. Top 10 Pick for September/October 2021, Commended
      A Bookstagang Best Picture Book of 2021 2021, Commended
      A Toronto Public Library First and Best List selection 2021, Commended
      A CBC Best Canadian Picture Book of 2021 2021, Commended
      A Best Children's Book of the Year 2022, Commended
      South Asia Book Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature 2022, Commended
      Best Books for Kids and Teens 2022, Commended
      Reviews

      "The simple joy of indulging in a delicious treat is captured exquisitely ... Provides a jubilant, affirming mirror for children who already know the comforting warmth of a cup of chai, and a welcoming window for those who haven’t yet had the pleasure. A wonderful choice for story time and a first purchase for all collections."


      "Particularly fun to read out loud ... Sweetly captures a slice of Indian life."

      "Beautiful cut-paper collage illustrations swirl and twirl like the steam from a cup of chai, adding crisp and colorful details ... The recipe is here integrated into the story itself."


      "Small moments of stillness, connection, and gratitude are a recipe for happiness in Chaiwala!, a sumptuous debut picture book ... A sensory experience to be savoured."


      "Priti Birla Maheshwari’s vibrant text will have readers dreaming of a delicious cup of chai ... Ashley Barron’s illustrations are equally as inspiring as the text."


      "A sensory celebration."

      "A heartwarming little tale about one of the simplest things that brings people together ... A delightful read, one rich for all your senses."

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