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Righting Canada's Wrongs Collection

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  • 1
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    9781552778531 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Grade (US) from 8 - 12, Reading age from 13 - 18 Publication Date:February 21, 2012
    $34.95 CAD 229 x 280 x 13 mm | 1100 gr | 160 pages Carton Quantity:14 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
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      Description

      This book is an illustrated history of the wartime internment of Japanese Canadian residents of British Columbia. At the time when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Japanese Canadians numbered well over 20,000. From the first arrivals in the late nineteenth century, they had taken up work in many parts of BC, established communities, and become part of the Canadian society even though theyfaced racism and prejudice in many forms.

      With war came wartime hysteria. Japanese Canadian residents of BC were rounded up, their homes and property seized, and forced to move to internment camps with inadequate housing, water, and food. Men and older boys went to road camps while some families ended up on farms where they were essentially slave labour. Eventually, after years of pressure, the Canadian government admitted that the internment was wrong and apologized for it.

      This book uses a wide range of historical photographs, documents, and images of museum artefacts to tell the story of the internment. The impact of these events is underscored by first-person narrative from five Japanese Canadians who were themselves youths at the time their families were forced to move to the camps.

      Bio

      MASAKO FUKAWA lived in Steveston, BC until the forced evacuation in 1942. Masako has worked as a teacher and principal. Her recent book, Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet, won the 2010 Canada-Japan Literary Award and was runner up for the 2010 Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award and the BC Historical Federation's 2009 Historical Writing Competition. She lives in Burnaby, BC.

      PAMELA HICKMAN is the author of over 35 non-fiction books for children, including winners of the Green Award for Sustainable Literature, International Best Book Award, Society of School Librarians, Canadian Authors Association Lilla Stirling Memorial Award and Parent's Choice Award. She lives in Canning, Nova Scotia.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      One of the Year's Best for 2012 -- Resource Links 2012, Commended
      Best Books for Kids & Teens -- Canadian Children's Book Centre 2012, Commended
      Reviews
      "For high school instructors--especially those seeking primary soruce documetns to have students analyze--this is a treasure-trove."
      Authors Pamela Hickman and Masako Fukawa skilfully follow the story of the Japanese in Canada, from the first wave of immigrants in 1877 through the internment years and the fight for redress. Arresting images dominate the pages, mixing family photographs, posters, museum artifacts, and news archives to create a vivid scrapbook, which also contains the recollections of five internment survivors. Their accounts, peppered generously throughout the book, bring to life the imagery and facts that might otherwise seem impersonal....The book proves an essential history lesson for a generation that may be unaware of this deplorable part of our nation's past.
      "an effective educational volume"
      "This book is very well-done... The visuals are spectacular and will surely be a drawing card for students... These are topics our students need to be informed about in order to understand and appreciate our history." Rated E - Excellent, enduring, everyone should see it!
      "...inviting like a yearbook or a highly polished scrapbook, bursting with photos as well as historic political cartoons and posters...The inclusion of simple maps, a detailed timeline and a glossary also contribute to the readability of this large-format volume...This book holds appeal for any young adult with an interest in the history of Canada."
      About the Righting Canada's Wrongs series:
      "As indicated by its name, this series is hopeful. It is not about opening old wounds; it's about remembering the past, understanding it and moving forward."
      Japanese Canadian Internment in the Second World War is a phenomenal achievement. More than 300 full-colour and black and white visuals (maps, photos, document facsimiles) powerfully evoke the times they represent, the personal stories give a strong and poignant voice to those who lived the experience, and the combination of historical content and first-person accounts make this a hugely accessible work for high school students in Canadian history and human rights courses. This book has a place, both in high school libraries and as a supplementary text for social studies classrooms.Highly Recommended
      "This is an impressive book filled with heart-wrenching stories of Japanese Canadians who endured this difficult period in their lives. It is a must have for all history teachers as it recognizes an event in Canadian history that should never be repeated."

      "Terrific and highly readable."


      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Righting Canada's Wrongs: Africville An African Nova Scotian Community Is Demolished — and Fights Back Gloria Ann Wesley Canada
    9781459413580 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Reading age from 9 Publication Date:April 30, 2019
    $34.95 CAD 280 x 229 x 13 mm | 800 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
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      Description

      The community of Africville was founded in the late 1800s when African Nova Scotians built homes on the Bedford Basin on the northern edge of Halifax. Africville grew to include a church, a school, and small businesses. At its peak, about 400 people lived there. The community was lively and vibrant, with a strong sense of culture and tradition. But the community had its problems. Racist attitudes prevented people from getting well-paying jobs in the city and the City of Halifax refused residents basic services such as running water, sewage disposal, and garbage collection.

      In the 1960s, in the name of urban renewal, the City of Halifax decided to demolish Africville, relocate its residents and use the land for industrial development. Residents strongly opposed this move, but their homes were bulldozed, and many had to move into public housing projects in other parts of the city.

      After years of pressure from former members of the community and their descendants, the City of Halifax finally apologized for the destruction of Africville and offered some compensation. A replica of the church was built on the site. But former residents and their descendants were refused compensation beyond what little was paid in the 1960s.

      Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives, this book tells the story of Africville. It documents how the city destroyed Africville and much later apologized for it — and how the spirit of the community lives on.

      Bio

      GLORIA ANN WESLEY is an award-winning African-Nova Scotian writer and a former teacher. She is the author of two novels, two books of poetry, and several picture books. If This is Freedom was chosen for One Book Nova Scotia in 2017. Her latest work is Abigail's Wish. Gloria resides in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Ontario Library Association's Best Bets 2019, Commended
      Reviews

      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

  • 3
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    Righting Canada's Wrongs: Anti-Semitism and the MS St. Louis Canada's Anti-Semitic Policies in the Twentieth Century Rona Arato Canada
    9781459415669 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Reading age from 9 Publication Date:January 19, 2021
    $34.95 CAD 229 x 280 x 13 mm | 760 gr | 88 pages Carton Quantity:26 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
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      Description

      Prior to the Second World War, Canada's Jewish community was well established in many cities, including Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg. As war grew closer, anti-Semitism across Europe was increasing. Hitler's Nazis were spreading hatred and violence towards Jews across Germany. At first, Jews were allowed to leave Germany and thousands escaped to save themselves and their families. Then countries around the world closed their doors to Jewish refugees. In 1939, the MS St. Louis sailed for Cuba with nearly a thousand Jewish men, women, and children looking for safety. They were turned away by Cuba, then the US. The ship sailed on to Canada.

      Despite pleas from the Canadian Jewish community, the government refused to allow the passengers to land in Canada. After war broke out, Canada continued to refuse Jewish refugees entry. When Britain forced Canada to take some refugees in, Canada imprisoned them in internment camps — alongside Nazis. Some of these Jewish refugees were only teenagers.

      Three years after the war ended and after the horrors of the Holocaust were universally known, Canada finally changed immigration policies and begin to accept Jews equally with other immigrants.

      Canada's long history of anti-Semitic immigration policies was deemed shameful. In November 2018, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made an official apology to the Jewish community for Canada's refusal to accept the passengers of the MS St. Louis, as well as for its historical anti-Semitic policies.

      Bio

      RONA ARATO is a former teacher and an award-winning author who writes about human rights and the Holocaust. From 1994-1998, she interviewed Holocaust survivors for Steven Spielberg's Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation. Her book, The Last Train, won numerous awards, including the Norma Fleck Award for best Canadian children's non-fiction book of 2014. Her book, The Ship to Nowhere, about the refugee ship Exodus 1947, was designated a Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Older Children by the Association of Jewish Libraries. Rona is a frequent speaker at schools and community organizations. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."


      "This story and the others in the “Righting Canada’s Wrongs” series should be essential teaching in Canadian classrooms at all grades."

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    9781459400955 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Grade (US) from 8 - 12, Reading age from 13 - 18 Publication Date:October 10, 2012
    $34.95 CAD 229 x 280 x 26 mm | 460 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:16 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
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      Description

      Italians came to Canada to seek a better life. From the 1870s to the 1920s they arrived in large numbers and found work mainly in mining, railway building, forestry, construction and farming. As time passed, many used their skills to set up successful small businesses, often in Little Italy districts in cities like Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton and Winnipeg. Many struggled with the language and culture in Canada, but their children became part of the Canadian mix.

      But when Canada declared war on Italy on June 10, 1940, the government used the War Measures Act to label all Italian citizens in Canada over the age of eighteen as enemy aliens. Those who had received Canadian citizenship after 1922 were also deemed enemy aliens. Immediately, the RCMP began making arrests. Men, young and old, and a few women were taken from their homes, offices or social clubs without warning. In all, about 700 were imprisoned in internment camps, mainly in Ontario and New Brunswick.

      The impact of this internment was felt immediately by families who lost husbands and fathers. Most families experienced severe economic hardship. None of those interned were ever charged with an offence of any kind. Eventually, all were released — many to join the Canadian armed forces.

      The effects of the internment lived on for decades. Eventually, pressure from the Italian Canadian community led Prime Minister Brian Mulroney to issue an apology for the internment and to admit that it was wrong.

      Using historical photographs, paintings, documents and first-person narratives, this book offers a full account of this little-known episode in Canadian history.

      Bio

      PAMELA HICKMAN is the author of over thirty-five non-fiction books for children, including winners of the Green Prize for Sustainable Literature, the Best Book Award from the Society of School Librarians International, and the Canadian Authors Association Lilla Sterling Memorial Award. She co-authored the first book in this series, Righting Canada’s Wrongs: Japanese Canadian Internment in the Second World War. She lives in Canning, Nova Scotia.

      JEAN SMITH CAVALLUZZO is a Toronto writer interested in social justice issues. She has degrees in sociology and social work as well as a diploma in journalism. Her articles have appeared in Chatelaine, the Toronto Star, Eye-talian Magazine, and the Globe and Mail. She has also written for CBC radio. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Best Books for Kids & Teens *Starred Selection* (Canadian Children's Book Centre) 2013, Commended
      Information Book Award 2013, Long-listed
      One of the Year's Best for 2013 -- Resource Links 2013, Commended
      Reviews
      "Even if a community can "move on", a story like this should never be forgotten. Italian Canadian Internment during the Second World War does an excellent job of telling the story of an ethnic community subjected to grossly unfair treatment and systemic discrimination, both by fellow Canadians and, most regrettably, the Canadian government. The book features a wealth of well-captioned visual material: colour and black and white photos, facsimiles of personal and government documents, and most powerfully, first-person accounts from the many who suffered as a result of the War Measures Act." Highly Recommended.
      Read an interview with the authors of Italian Canadian Internment.
      "Hickman and Smith Cavalluzzo have written an informative and visually appealing book about the internment of Italian Canadians, incorporating personal photographs and testimonies, newspaper articles, historical photographs and many other primary sources." Full Review
      "This book is very well-done... The visuals are spectacular and will surely be a drawing card for students at the upper elementary and junior high levels" Rated E, excellent, enduring, everyone should see it!

      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools The Devastating Impact on Canada's Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Findings and Calls for Action Melanie Florence Canada
    9781459408661 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Grade (US) from 8 - 12, Reading age from 9 - 11 Publication Date:December 21, 2015
    $34.95 CAD 229 x 280 x 26 mm | 980 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:16 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
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      Description

      Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history.

      In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Province of Canada with the aim of assimilating First Nations people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned the "Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-Breeds." This report led to native residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children aged seven to fifteen years old were taken from their families, sometimes by force, and sent to residential schools where they were made to abandon their culture. They were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language, and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by the churches and funded by the federal government.

      About 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada.

      The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation.

      Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.

      Bio

      MELANIE FLORENCE is full-time writer based in Toronto. She is the author of the SideStreets novel One Night and the Recordbooks title Jordin Tootoo: The Highs and Lows in the Journey of the First Inuk to Play in the NHL, which was chosen as an Honor Book by The American Indian Library Association. As a freelance journalist, Melanie's byline has appeared in magazines including Dance International, Writer, Parents Canada, and Urban Male Magazine. Melanie is of Plains Cree and Scottish descent.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Ontario Library Association's Best Bets 2015, Commended
      Toronto Public Library - The List: Great Reads for Youth 2017, Commended
      Canadian Children's Book Centre Best Books for Kids & Teens 2016, Commended
      Resource Links - The Year's Best 2016, Commended
      Reviews

      "If I were purchasing materials for a high school library, I would buy at least 2 copies, and I would urge Social Studies and Aboriginal Studies classroom teachers to have at least one copy on their bookselves. Perhaps the strongest work to date in the Righting Canada's Wrongs series, Residential Schools underscores the importance of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's work... Highly Recommended."


      "As one of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action states, 'Make age-appropriate curriculum on residential schools, Treaties, and Aboriginal peoples' historical and contemporary contributions to Canada a mandetory education requirement for kindergarten to Grade Twelve students.' (p. 7) this book certainly contributes to this action and should be added to every junior and senior high school and public library in Canada. Highly Recommended." Rated E - Excellent, enduring, everyone should see it!


      "A great book...there's a lot there for us all."


      "This resource-rich book is sure to spark both class and individual exploration. An index, glossary, and timeline will help teens navigate the rich content in this book, while links to online video and audio clips and the 'For Further Reading' section will guide them beyond its pages. Teachers will also find lesson plans and other helpful tools in an accompanying series Resource Guide."


      Recommended by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett for the #GiftingReconciliation Campaign


      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

  • 6
    catalogue cover
    9781459404434 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Grade (US) from 8 - 12, Reading age from 13 - 18 Publication Date:October 20, 2014
    $34.95 CAD 229 x 280 x 26 mm | 780 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The first Chinese immigrants arrived in Canada in the mid-1800s searching for gold and a better life. They found jobs in forestry, mining, and other resource industries. But life in Canada was difficult and the immigrants had to face racism and cultural barriers. Thousands were recruited to work building the Canadian Pacific Railway. Once the railway was finished, Canadian governments and many Canadians wanted the Chinese to go away.
      The government took measures to stop immigration from China to Canada. Starting in 1885, the government imposed a Head Tax with the goal of stopping immigration from China. In 1923 a ban was imposed that lasted to 1947. Despite this hostility and racism, Chinese-Canadian citizens built lives for themselves and persisted in protesting official discrimination. In June 2006, Prime Minister Harper apologized to Chinese Canadians for the former racist policies of the Canadian government.
      Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from Chinese Canadians who experienced the Head Tax or who were children of Head Tax payers, this book offers a full account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.
      Bio

      ARLENE CHAN, a third-generation Chinese Canadian, is a retired librarian and author of non-fiction works for children, young adults, and adults on Chinese festivals and the Chinese in Canada. An avid dragon boat racer and gold-medalist on the Canadian National Women’s Dragon Boat Team, she lives, writes, and paddles in Toronto.


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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Canadian Children's Book Centre Best Books for Kids & Teens Starred Selection 2015, Winner
      Resource Links The Year's Best - Non-Fiction Grades 7-12 2015, Winner
      Reviews
      "The visuals are spectacular and will surely be a drawing card for students at the upper elementary, junior and senior high levels who might be studying this topic in their Canadian social studies programs...I would recommend this title for all schools and public libraries. These are topics our students need to be informed about in order to understand and appreciate our history. Rated E, excellent."
      "Arlene Chan has done a masterjob authoring this book...The Chinese Head Tax is a powerful story. Deeply moving and hugely important are the many recollections offered by eight Chinese Canadian who suffered with their families as a result of the head tax and the 24 years of the Exclusion Act. High school students and teachers of Canadian history and human rights courses will learn much from this book. Sadly, one of the lessons is that Canada has not always been a "just" society. Highly Recommended."
      "...suitable for young readers of grade five and above.They will get more out of reading this book if they are guided by parents or teachers who can help them better understand and appreciate the complex issues and historical occurences."
      "An excellent resource for students doing a school or family genealogy project, or for those with an inquisitive mind. Once the book is opened, the photographs will definitely catch the attention and spark the interest of the reader."

      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    9781459404373 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Social Topics Age (years) from 13 - 18, Grade (US) from 8 - 12, Reading age from 13 - 18 Publication Date:May 09, 2014
    $34.95 CAD 229 x 280 x 26 mm | 820 gr | 104 pages Carton Quantity:18 Canadian Rights: Y Lorimer
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      Description

      In 1914, Canada was a very British society with anti-Asian attitudes. Although Great Britain had declared that all people from India were officially British citizens and could live anywhere in the British Commonwealth, Canada refused to accept them. This racist policy was challenged by Gurdit Singh, a Sikh businessman, who chartered a ship, the Komagata Maru, and sailed to Vancouver with over 300 fellow Indians wishing to immigrate to Canada. They were turned back, tragically.

      Over the years, the Canadian government gradually changed its immigration policies, first allowing entry to wives and children of Indian immigrants and later to many more immigrants from India. The Indo-Canadian community has grown throughout Canada, especially in British Columbia. Many in the community continue to celebrate their Indian heritage which enriches Canadian culture.

      Bio

      PAMELA HICKMAN is the author of over forty non-fiction books for children, including winners of the Green Prize for Sustainable Literature, the Best Book Award from the Society of School Librarians International and the Canadian Authors Association Lilla Sterling Memorial Award. She co-authored the first book in this series, Righting Canada's Wrongs: Japanese Canadian Internment in the Second World War. She lives in Canning, Nova Scotia.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Canadian Children's Book Centre Best Books for Kids & Teens , Winner
      Reviews
      "An engaging read for tweens and teens, presenting an honest picture of Canadian history and the struggles of the Indo-Canadian community."
      The Komagata Maru does an excellent job of telling a regrettable story of injustice and government-legislated controls of immigration . . . this book tells much of the story through presentation of a truly impressive collection of images, visual material, and video clips: the colour and black and white photos and the facsimiles of personal and government documents are richly captioned and hugely informative. A most useful work, both as a source of information on the history of Indian immigration to Canada and of systemic discrimination, enacted by the government of Canada, based purely on ethnic intolerance. Highly Recommended.

      "A wonderful series [Righting Canada's Wrongs] of beautiful books."

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