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  • 1
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    Marvellous Grounds Queer of Colour Formations in Toronto Jin Haritaworn, Ghaida Moussa Canada, Syrus Ware Canada
    9781771133647 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / LGBTQ+ Studies Publication Date:October 18, 2018
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.5 in | 400 gr | 272 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      Toronto has long been a place that people of colour move to in order to join queer of colour communities. Yet the city’s rich history of activism by queer and trans Black, Indigenous, and racialized people (QTBIPOC) remains largely unwritten and unarchived. While QTBIPOC have a long and visible presence in the city, they always appear as newcomers in queer urban maps and archives in which white queers appear as the only historical subjects imaginable.

      The first collection of its kind to feature the art, activism, and writings of QTBIPOC in Toronto, Marvellous Grounds tells the stories that have shaped Toronto’s landscape but are frequently forgotten or erased. Responding to an unmistakable desire in QTBIPOC communities for history and lineage, this rich volume allows us to imagine new ancestors and new futures.

      Bio

      Jin Haritaworn is associate professor of gender, race, and environment at York University.



      Ghaida Moussa is a PhD candidate in the Social and Political Thought program at York University.



      Syrus Marcus Ware is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Ontario Legislative Assembly Speaker's Book Award 2020, Short-listed
      Reviews

      As the lead singer of the radical duo LAL and co-organizer of the DIY QT2S/BIPOC space, Unit 2, I am so happy to see this important book that highlights some of the amazing work and stories by QTBIPOC/friends in Toronto. More than half of the contributors have shared space or gathered at Unit 2, so this book resonates in my body and soul. Marvellous Grounds is a necessary piece of writing that documents and helps keep our stories alive, in a way that is for us by us. This book will share important perspectives with a new generation of QTBIPOCs and friends, while honouring the stories, people, and places that fought and fight for justice and freedom, in this amazing but complicated meeting place, Toronto.


      Marvellous Grounds is a beautiful gathering of QTBIPOC artists, organizers, activists, and cultural workers that achieve the Morrisonian [Toni Morrison’s] task of creating a map outside of the mandates of conquest, specifically its homonormative archival practices. Speaking across time and space, the Marvellous Grounds collective lovingly curates visual art, prose, intimate conversations and tender caresses taking place on Toronto’s street corners that have the potential to heal both the ancestors and the generations yet to come. Creating marvelous ground in Toronto, this stunning collection resists inclusion into normative and homonationalist queer Canadian archives. It also refuses to help repair this archive. Instead, Marvellous Grounds beautifully disfigures the colonial project of archiving as it yearns and reaches for what the co-editors call “the something yet-to-be-done.” Marvellous Grounds is a healing praxis that QTBIPOC communities can bask in as they soak up the sweet balm it tenders. This collection is a gift.


      More than simply a static archive, Marvellous Grounds is a call for QTBIPOC to step into a “permanent readiness for the marvellous,” a phrase the book borrows from Martinique-born scholar and activist Suzanne Césaire’s description of surrealism. This archive marvels not only at the love, generosity, and care between QTBIPOC folks of Tkaronto, but also on communal tears shed for lives lost at the hands of structural violence. As such, Marvellous Grounds is romantic, without romanticizing the struggle.


      Marvellous Grounds seeks freedom through transformative and reparatory justice by making space to the de-historicized, de-spatialized subjects of queer of colors in Toronto. The coloniality of space and place are turned into Marvellous Grounds by spatializing intergenerational conversations among QTBIPOC and their practices of caretaking and solidarity. The intellectual tightness runs skin deep and unearths the colonial complicity of progressive movements while queer of colour formations dare to live their own decolonial life.


      Upending white supremacist, neoliberal narratives of “gay progress,” Marvellous Grounds shows us Toronto’s QTBIOC communities surviving and thriving in the midst of violent forces of erasure. The essays, dialogues, and creative interventions gathered here offer an invitation to remember and learn from rich and resplendent stories—of organizing and activism, of dance parties, reading groups, performances, and everyday life. This is the history we want and the history we need.


      Marvellous Grounds makes visible a counter archive of QTBIPOC in Toronto. Through highlighting histographies of activism and alliances created against racism and classism, we see how QTBIPOC have contributed to shaping a strong community of artists and activists that are at the forefront of anti-colonial, black, and Queer/Trans movements in Toronto.


      Marvellous Grounds is an incredibly important critical intervention into the ongoing creation and theorization of queer counter archives and their frequent whitewashing. The artists/activists/academics whose work is collected here offer a multilayered, sharp, original, and touching take on queer Toronto past and present that will be relevant to scholars and practitioners far beyond the local context.


      Marvellous Grounds is a stunning anthology - love letter after love letter to QTIPOCs to claim place, space, lineage. Amidst a dominant queer archive that deliberately whitens queer art, research and activism as an act of pinkwashing, this collection pierces through and rightfully places racialized queers not as diversity subjects but as the leading architects of queer political organizing and magic-makers of queer life in Toronto.”


      Marvellous Grounds is a foundational book for gender, queer, postcolonial, and critical race scholarship. Archiving and reflecting on four decades of queer and trans Black, Indigenous and people of colour (QTBIPOC) historiography, collective organizing, cartographies of violence and building communities of care and healing in the city of Toronto, this inspiring book is a must read for activists, artists, and academics alike who radically question who the subject of queer history is and more importantly dare to ask “What kind of ancestor do I want to be?”


      This exceptionally innovative book initiates a whole new era in QTBIPOC research, from the collaborative process of conceptualizing a research project across generations and across racialized and other positionalities, to its totally uncompromising critique of white queer erasures of QTIBIPOC theories, practices, and subjectivities, to its brilliant renderings of QTBIPOC historiographies including creative survival strategies, the construction of new relationalities, and political inventions, throughout. This is radically transformative scholarship at its very best.


      A vivid, bold, and inspiring celebration of what it means to love and struggle in difference and community. Written by those who walk their talk, this book evokes the joy and power of creative activism.


      Marvellous Grounds is a compelling and transformative site of queer of colour creation and ongoing creativity, collectively confronting and refusing dominant white queer archives. Together, the essays build queer counter-archives as their own form, where writing and genealogies of thought emerge in collective organizing, art practices, abolitionist work, disability justice, poetics, healing justice, performance, anti-racism, and spirituality. In this long-awaited anthology, the authors make possible the kinds of depth and life that come from an effort to pause, and take hold of what emerges in our struggles to find new ways of being with one’s self and amongst others.


      Marvellous Grounds describes a Toronto that makes sense and feels right. It doesn’t suffer from impossible racial homogeneity or glib hollow triumph. This gentle, trusting, personal collection lingers over homelessness, racial profiling, protest, worship, and the struggle of queers of colour starting families, and so is a Toronto origin story that feels real.


      Marvellous Grounds’ pages will now forever be part of our beautiful, complicated, complex connective tissue. This is essential reading for conversations around QTBIPOC organizing, resistance and resilience strategies. It is a testament to an often-ignored history; a celebration of the often-misunderstood.


      Marvellous Grounds showcases the stunning array of queer and trans Black, Indigenous, and people of color (QTBIPOC) organizing, community building, and space making practices in the Toronto area since the 1970s. This collection will be a resource to QTBIPOC searching for their community, history, and culture; to activists and community-builders looking for effective and innovative organizing models; and to academics seeking of new archives of QTBIPOC activism and culture.


      The authors, artists, and activists gathered in this extraordinary book invoke an insurgent and untameable queer and trans history, one which confronts both co-option and self-congratulation. Boldly making space for the silenced, criminalized, and displaced voices of queer and trans Black, Indigenous and people of colour (QTBIPOC), Marvellous Grounds disrupts queer nostalgia, complacency, and white fragility, and testifies to QTBIPOC resilience, resistance, and healing. Whether you come to this book in search of a radically transformative decolonial theory and praxis, or to reclaim a displaced queer/trans lineage, these stories are guaranteed to move, challenge, and inspire.

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Queer Progress From Homophobia to Homonationalism Tim McCaskell Canada
    9781771132787 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / LGBTQ+ Studies Publication Date:September 08, 2016
    $39.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.9 in | 663 gr | 520 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      How did a social movement evolve from a small group of young radicals to the incorporation of LGBTQ communities into full citizenship on the model of Canadian multiculturalism?

      Tim McCaskell contextualizes his work in gay, queer, and AIDS activism in Toronto from 1974 to 2014 within the shift from the Keynesian welfare state of the 1970s to the neoliberal economy of the new millennium. A shift that saw sexuality —once tightly regulated by conservative institutions—become an economic driver of late capitalism, and sexual minorities celebrated as a niche market. But even as it promoted legal equality, this shift increased disparity and social inequality. Today, the glue of sexual identity strains to hold together a community ever more fractured along lines of class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the celebration of LGBTQ inclusion pinkwashes injustice at home and abroad.

      Queer Progress tries to make sense of this transformation by narrating the complexities and contradictions of forty years of queer politics in Canada’s largest city.

      Bio

      From 1974 to 1986 Tim McCaskell was a member of the collective that ran The Body Politic, Canada’s iconic gay liberation journal. He was a founding member of AIDS ACTION NOW!, and a spokesperson for Queers Against Israeli Apartheid. He is the author of Race to Equity: Disrupting Educational Inequality.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      “Change a few names, places, and organizations, and most development professionals will recognize their colleagues and field acquaintances in the colourful cast of characters Claessens weaves into his narrative about the vagaries of international development work. This engagingly written insider story is a must-read for those who may never visit the field themselves, but who are ardent consumers of international development marketing spin—the kind of spin used to raise funds to pay for more of the same kinds of blunders that Claessens documents.”


      Chosen as a Quill & Quire favourite release of the year!

      The fastest 500-pages of non-fiction I’ve read in a long time. Tim McCaskell goes beyond a historical or theoretical account of the strange transformation that characterize queer politics in Canada, and actually teases out the mechanics of those changes. He grounds his thorough breakdown of these movements with playful anecdotes and clear, concise political analysis.


      “This is a sobering, painful, and often humorous chronicle, which brutally questions the business of externally imposed “development” with scant attention to cooperation in Africa and elsewhere. This is not a book to read and put away. Every line matters and demands action.”


      “Jacques Claessens gives us an insider’s rich account of how “international development” actually works or, often, fails to work. With humor and colorful anecdotes, Claessens shows how the lack of real consultation can squander funds and opportunities, leaving little behind. This is a must-read for anyone interested in the genuine advancement of the world’s poor.”


      Queer Progress is an essential book, one I would especially recommend to American readers, who – dare I say it? – are often incapable of seeing past their own borders.

  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Carousel April Ford Canada
    9781771337137 Paperback FICTION / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:May 08, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.8 in | 350 gr | 304 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      Winner of the 2020 International Book Award for LGBTQ Fiction; Finalist for the Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards

      Margot Wright has led a deliberate life. At 18, she left her unusual and abusive family situation and never looked back, and then two years later she devoted herself wholly to Estelle Coté, her first and only love. But now, at 45, freshly retired from a career in antique firearms dealing, and settling into a new home with her wife, Margot finds herself feeling restless. Bored. She admits this to herself on the day she visits Le Galopant, a historic carousel that has become bafflingly meaningful to Estelle; and, as with anyone wishing to dodge a midlife crisis, Margot sets her feelings aside, intending to ignore them for as long as possible.

      At La Ronde, the amusement park where Le Galopant is showcased, Margot is accosted by a 17-year-old girl named Katherine de Wilde. Katy is hyper and unrefined, "rural," everything Margot cannot stand, yet she finds herself thinking more and more about the lisping girl in the Converse sneakers and "Meat is Murder" T-shirt as the days tread on. Even after Estelle discovers a massive secret she's been keeping for a decade, forces her into couples counseling and then on a road trip to confront this secret, Margot is unable to stop Katy from seeping into her thoughts. So when Katy phones her one morning with bad news, "They're taking down Le Galopant for good. It's broken!" Margot yields to impulse and pursues her interest in the girl.

      Set between Montreal, Quebec and various American cities, Carousel is a story about secrets--secret yearnings, lives, and losses--and the measures we take to protect our loved ones from the monsters we see ourselves to be.

      Bio

      April Ford's story collection, The Poor Children, published in 2015, was shortlisted for the international Scott Prize for a debut short story collection, and their story "Project Fumarase" was among the winning pieces featured in the 2016 Pushcart Prize anthology. April received their B.A. in Creative Writing and Professional Writing from Concordia University (Montreal, Quebec), and their M.F.A. in Fiction from Queens University of Charlotte (Charlotte, North Carolina). They spent time at Virginia Center for the Creative Arts as a Robert Johnson Fellow, and at Ucross Foundation as a Writer in Residence. From 2010-2017, they taught French and creative writing at State University of New York at Oneonta. Their writing has appeared in numerous print and online journals, including Grain, New Madrid, Ploughshares, Beecher's, Atticus Review, SAND, Santa Fe Literary Review, and Gargoyle. They live in Montreal.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards 2020, Short-listed
      International Book Awards (LGBTQ Fiction) 2020, Winner
      Reviews

      ..."well-developed characters gallop through this poignant exploration of intergenerational trauma, skillfully offset with dark humour..."
      -The Montreal Review of Books

      "Carousel is a marvel of intriguing detail, little observations that give added dimension to the narrative and insight into the roiling confusion that is Margot's state of mind."
      -The Ottawa Review of Books

      "It's kind of an updated Jane Eyre, accelerated for the twenty-first century, with smartphones and texting."
      - Jack Ruttan, Montreal writer and illustrator

      '"Spellbinding and beautifully written-a galloping ride into love, relationships, and friendship,and the burdens of family history."
      -Cora Siré, author of Behold Things Beautiful

      "Dear Reader: This novel contains evil Siamese cats, total disregard for Chekhov's gun theory, much French without translation, a madhouse in Cape Cod, several carousel horses named Napoleon, Bertrand the secret knitter, waffles, a merry-go-round, a marriage in crisis, a crazy mother, and references to Les Nessman. What more could you ask for in April Ford's debut?"
      - Colleen Curran, author of Out for Stars and the Lenore trilogy

      "An arch and darkly comic look into obsession, marriage, and family trauma, Carousel takes us deep into the tilting, whirling world of Margot Soucy, its one-of-a-kind protagonist. Caught between three formidable women-intimidating Estelle, insouciant Katy, and unstable Marguerite-Margot must determine for herself the answer to the question that dogs modern life: Why do we want what we want, and what will we sacrifice to get it? Her journey will stay with you long after your head's stopped spinning."
      -Anna Leventhal, author of Sweet Affliction

      "Carousel is an acerbic but open-hearted novel about break-ups and new beginnings that is as lovingly crafted as its central metaphor. And there is a depth of characterization here sadly lacking in so much contemporary fiction. An amazing debut novel."-James Grainger, author of the bestselling novel Harmless

  • 4
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    Days of Moonlight Loren Edizel Canada
    9781771334778 Paperback FICTION / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:April 30, 2018
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.5 in | 350 gr | 220 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry and Fiction Series
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      Description

      Finalist for the 2019 Fred Kerner Book Award; Finalist for the 2019 International Book Awards for Literary Fiction

      Upon receiving a letter and a package of journals from a dying Mehtap, her mother Nuray's close friend in Turkey, a young Toronto woman immerses herself in the old woman's memories. She uncovers Mehtap's story as a factory worker in the 1960s who is infatuated with her boss, a man she willingly lies for, and even wrap presents for that he gives to his mistress and his wife. When her friend, Nuray, moves in with her, something unexpected happens and Mehtap is forced to choose between her two loves. Mehtap's story is interwoven with that of her parents, Cretan refugees who landed in Izmir in the mid-twenties as a result of the disastrous population exchange, only to discover an inescapable and tragic truth that shatters their lives. As Mehtap's writings unfurl, Nuray's daughter -- Mehtap's namesake -- now the keeper of the journals, notebooks and letters written by her mother's friend, also uncovers her own mother's deeply-held secrets, furtive yearnings, and forbidden love.

      Bio

      Loren Edizel was born in Izmir, Turkey, and has lived in Canada most of her life. She is the author of three novels, Adrift (2011) (long-listed for the ReLit Awards), The Ghosts of Smyrna (2013), and a collection of short stories, Confessions: A Book of Tales (2014). The Ghosts of Smyrna was also published in Turkish, in Turkey, in 2017. Her short fiction has appeared in journals in both Canada and in Turkey. She lives in Toronto with her family.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      American Book Feat International Book Awards (Fiction-Literary) 2019, Short-listed
      Fred Kerner Book Award 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews

      "A commendable well-written contribution to Canadian literature, by others for all others! More than moonlight!
      --Montreal Serai

      "This is a little gem of a book, full of all the tales that make us and unmake us - real and imagined ones, past and present ones. I am infatuated with the voice of our protagonist Mehtap, at times poignant, at times funny - it is totally unique and at the same time, all of us. It is a story about love, the choices we make and the choices that life makes for us."
      --Cecilia Ekb?ck, author of Wolf Winter and In the Month of the Midnight Sun

      "Reading this novel was like sliding into a warm bath. It's a luminous work, a love story that spans several decades. There is also much wisdom and insight to be found along the way. Reader, you are in for a treat."
      --Morris Berman, author of The Reenchantment of the World

      "From the first page, via two simple bracelets, Loren Edizel's Days of Moonlight brings the reader to heartbreakingly real crossroads where desire, family secrets and the legacy of Greco-Turkish conflict all meet--and yet, thanks to the author's concise images and considered style, the novel also succeeds in reading with the dreamy timelessness we love in the greatest myths and fables. It's wonderful."
      --Daniel Perry, author of Nobody Looks That Young Here

      "Loren Edizel's fiction speaks through the passage of time itself--the poignancy of what history erases and what only the written word can save. Lovingly written, Days of Moonlight reveals the passionate love and friendship of two women who embody the history and culture of a passing age, and the tender bonds of family and place."
      --Carole Giangrande, author of All That Is Solid Melts Into Air

      "A beautiful, moving portrayal of the complexities and richness of life, and love gained, lost and re-found--a poetic novel full of visceral imagery. You can hear the clinking of the tea glasses, taste the salt of the Aegean Sea, and see the red-tiled roofs of Izmir. You will be transported to Crete, Turkey and Canada where past and present comingle in the sensual and often bittersweet power of memory, and become immersed in the stories of strong women, and the women and men they love."
      --Melinda Vandenbeld Giles, author of Clara Awake

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Steel Animals SK Dyment Canada
    9781771335331 Paperback FICTION / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:September 20, 2018
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.75 in | 270 gr | 260 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      Hilarity and queer magic realism twist the throttle when Jackie, a loner with a secret bank-robbing persona, meets Vespa: sexy, sculpture-welding artist and collector of vintage motorbikes. Still planning elaborate revenge on a New York ex-lover, Jackie tests both her new relationship and the loyalties of her friends, a rag-tag gang of post-punk eccentrics, realizing how love changes hatred only after her scheme runs out of control. An innocent misstep and an encrypted mystery swings the romance into the dangerous orbit of a construction mogul intent on subverting corporate money at any cost.

      Bio

      SK Dyment is a writer and visual artist with a love of political cartooning. SK likes take to the stage at open mic events to perform poetry, short prose and stand-up work and they have written several plays which were produced at Buddies In Bad Times Theatre. Their illustrations were most recently published in Ursula Pflug's flash fiction novel, Motion Sickness, which was longlisted for the ReLit Award. Their humour and cartooning work has appeared in a number of magazines including, Peace Magazine, This Magazine, Open Road Magazine, Healthsharing, Herizons, Kinesis, The Activist Magazine, Kick It Over Magazine, and Fireweed. Steel Animals is their debut novel.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Refreshingly different, fast-paced and nervy, while the themes are sobering. Expect the outrageous. This is a writer who is in touch with the surreal and the dark, yet with that rare talent that can't be taught--to surprise and delight the reader."
      --Heather Spears, author of The Strong Box

      "I laughed out loud throughout the book Written with depth and authority about welding, motorcycles, flying, explosives, sex-trade exploitation, art and various other matters. In addition to the obvious humour, the book is full of cleverness and satire, often in subtle asides. Milieux wonderfully different from the usual run of Canlit." "
      --Susan Mayse, author of Ginger: The Life and Death of Albert Goodwin, winner of the Arthur Ellis Award for True Crime

      "Steel Animals is a powerful, brash, and magically sassy novel filled with a dynamic, surreal sense of journey, abandonment, romantic discord, and hilarious entanglement. The sheer dexterity of phrasing and ideas from start to finish make this tour de force a thoroughly enjoyable, sexy, and consistently thrilling read. Corporate corruption, hijacked bank machines, and towering condos filter in and out of a complex web of scenes and relationships that culminate in violent arboreal splendour. Reminiscent of Tom Robbins, Steel Animals, as a mighty serio-comic novel, utilizes a kind of magical surrealism that serves to punctuate the dire effects of certain corporate entities. This is a novel not to be missed."
      --David Bateman, blogger, poet and performance artist

  • 6
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    The Heart Begins Here Jacqueline Dumas Canada
    9781771335416 Paperback FICTION / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:October 01, 2018
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.45 in | 350 gr | 180 pages Carton Quantity:38 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      Finalist for the 2019 Golden Crown Literary Society Awards for General Fiction

      The Heart Begins Here is the story of the ever-optimistic, earnest Sara Requier and her disintegrating seven-year relationship with the cynical Wanda Wysoka. Along with her relationship struggles, Sara must contend with the drastic changes in the book industry that threaten her feminist bookstore, as well as a mother who refuses to accept her daughter's lesbianism. Then, just as Wanda decides to leave Sara, Wanda's new young lover, Cindy, is murdered. The story takes place in a western Canadian city in 2001 -- much of it in Sara's bookstore, Common Reader Books -- in the shadow of the disturbing political climate that followed the 9/11 attacks in the U.S. This is a transitional point in the Canadian book industry: the proliferation of big box stores, the expansion of the Internet -- and Sara is caught up in the concomitant changes in her community. The book explores themes of love and loss, of the lingering effects of a dysfunctional childhood, of misogyny, of personal and societal homophobia, and especially the challenge of integrating the personal with the political.

      Bio

      Jacqueline Dumas is a writer and educator who lives in Nova Scotia. She was a long-time resident of Edmonton, Alberta, where she ran Aspen Books (1977-1985) and latterly Orlando Books (1993-2002), a progressive, feminist bookstore that promoted countless writers from across the country. Her published works include: Madeleine & the Angel (1989), winner of the 1989 Georges Bugnet Award for Best Alberta novel, and a finalist for the 1989 Books in Canada/W.H. Smith Best First Novel Award; The Last Sigh (1993); a children's picture book, And I'm Never Coming Back (1986); and a one-act play, Secrets, which was produced at the 2013 Edmonton International Fringe Festival. In 2012, she edited an anthology of work by second language writers, Writing in the Margins (Writers Beyond Borders). Her community involvement and commitment has earned her various awards, including awards for service to the Gay and Lesbian communities and the YWCA Woman of Distinction for the Arts.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Golden Crown Literary Society Awards (General Fiction) 2019, Joint winner
      Reviews

      "The Heart Begins Here is a delightful read that made me both think and laugh out loud. Sara's feminist bookstore is failing and her long-time lover is cheating. Dumas brings all of Sara's difficulties to life in incisive and often satirical prose. She skewers disastrous poetry readings and lesbian hangouts, but her true targets are cruelty, misogyny, and homophobia. As the title promises, the novel offers wisdom as well as humour, and pain as well as love."
      --Caterina Edwards, author of The Sicilian Wife and Finding Rosa

      "The Heart Begins Here is a novel for these times, exploring issues that many of us ponder regularly: the impacts of international conflict on individual lives; the effects of digital technology on how we create and access books and other forms of culture; the challenges of navigating the world as who we are, rather than as who others think we are&,dash;or who we ought to be. This is a novel about beginnings, changes, endings--of relationships, of business ventures--and about how the knowledge we gain as we progress (often unwillingly) through these cycles is essential to our ability to move forward. By turns poignant and laugh-out-loud funny, Jacqueline Dumas's new novel deftly keeps us turning pages, as much for the pleasure of reading her writing as from our keen interest in discovering what will happen next."
      --Mary W. Walters, author of The Woman Upsatirs, Rita Just Wants to Be Thin, and Cool

  • 7
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    Bones Tyler Pennock Canada
    9781771315210 Paperback POETRY / American Publication Date:April 01, 2020
    $20.00 CAD 6 x 7.75 x 0.45 in | 250 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2020 Raymond Souster Award Longlist * 2021 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award Shortlist * 2021 Indigenous Voices Awards Shortlist

      Poems about a young two-spirit Indigenous man moving through shadow and trauma toward strength and awareness.

      Bones, Tyler Pennock's wise and arresting debut, is about the ways we process the traumas of our past, and about how often these experiences eliminate moments of softness and gentleness. Here, the poems journey inward, guided by the world of dreams, seeking memories of a loving sister lost beneath layers of tragedy and abuse. With bravery, the poems stand up to the demons lurking in the many shadows of their lines, seeking glimpses of a good that is always just out of reach.

      At moments heartrending and gut-punching, at others still and sweet, Bones is a collection of deep and painstaking work that examines the human spirit in all of us. This is a hero's journey and a stark look at the many conditions of the soul. This is a book for survivors, for fighters, for dreamers, and for believers.

      Bio

      Tyler Pennock is a Two-Spirit Queerdo from Faust, Alberta, and is a member of Sturgeon Lake Cree Nation. They were adopted from a Cree and Métis family, and reunited with them in 2006. Tyler is a graduate of Guelph University's Creative Writing MFA program (2013), as well as the University of Toronto (2009). They have lived in Toronto for the past 25 years. Bones is their first book.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Pennock's shifting, expansive book-length poem luminously reflects the scattered fragments of memory with language that fluiding mixes abstraction, reflection and recurrent imagery. Bones gradually unveils the pain and trauma that seeps through time and relations, in a way that mimics the heart's unveiling itself. His touchstones of Indigenous ceremony and ritual grounds the collection in a way that navigates the reader through a rich archeology of bones that are not merely relics, but oracles." — Jury Citation, 2021 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award

      "Here is a spare and urgent voice that speaks of 'wounds and beauty,' that gestures to a story of trauma and abuse while offering us a potent journey of self-reckoning and reclamation. Bones entwines brutality with the deepest tenderness and in its clear-eyed way asks us, as poetry must, to re-see the world." — Catherine Bush, author of Accusation and The Rules of Engagement

      "Tyler Pennock's poetry unfurls like breath: measured, light, caught, whispering, and vital. It charts memory with a steady hand and unerring allegiance to locating the 'beauty/in terrible things.' Bones addresses the effects of intergenerational, state-sponsored trauma with an enviable grace, inscribing and affirming life on the other side of overwhelming pain, abuse, and grief. It carries on, resilient, defiant, gazing at the stars, one breath at a time." — Laurie D. Graham, author of Settler Education

      "Tyler Pennock's Bones is a soft meandering through the memories of the narrator's hearthome: a place in which trauma, kinship, abuse, and nostalgia cradle one another in a circle. Here, poetics are deployed to inspect the most minute of objects with such wild abandon that the narrator transplants us into a world rife with sharpness so as to make the image complete, focussed, lifelike, photographic even as he continually 'wish[es he] were like water'. Here we find memory and dream animated in equal measure: two spirits sitting in a basement, a headless mother, a white bear, wihtiko, and a sister slowly vanishing. Lyrical, witty, heart-wrenching, and empowering, Pennock's debut book of poetry is a contemplative epic asking us to ponder the ethics of remembrance in all of its lacings of razing and revitalization." — Joshua Whitehead, author of Full-Metal Indigiqueer and Jonny Appleseed

  • 8
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    First Arleen Paré Canada
    9781771315425 Paperback POETRY / Women Authors Publication Date:May 01, 2021
    $22.95 CAD 5.75 x 8.5 x 0.5 in | 260 gr | 127 pages Carton Quantity:37 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      Governor General's Award?winning poet Arleen Paré combines the story of two first best friends with questions of the mystery of cosmic first cause.

      The poems in First, Arleen Paré's seventh collection, search for a long-lost first friend. They conjure the subtle layers of meaning in that early friendship to riff on to a search for how we might possibly understand the primal First: the beginnings of the cosmos that contains our own particular lives, beginnings and longings.

      This layered evocation of the past—of childhood in 1950s Dorval, "a green mesh of girls friendships and fights"—and the intensity of the desire to know, give First its haunting beauty. "[T]he word though old fashioned," Paré writes, "is whence . . . unconditioned origins" when "no worthy question is ever answered on the same plane that it was asked; how to frame the question not knowing the plane on which I must ask it."

      Bio

      Arleen Paré's first book, Paper Trail, was nominated for the Dorothy Livesay BC Book Award for Poetry and won the City of Victoria Butler Book Prize in 2008. Leaving Now, a mixed-genre novel released in 2012, was highlighted on All Lit Up. Lake of Two Mountains, her third book, won the 2014 Governor General's Award for Poetry, was nominated for the Butler Book Prize and won the CBC Bookie Award. Paré's poetry collection, He Leaves His Face in the Funeral Car, was a 2015 Victoria Butler Book Prize finalist. The Girls with Stone Faces, her fifth book, won the American Golden Crown Award for poetry in 2018. Her sixth book, Earle Street, was released in Spring, 2020. She lives in Victoria with her partner of forty years.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Arleen Paré's First is an intriguing Gertrude Stein as Nancy Drew mystery. Using prose poem narrative and an intense syntactic poetics, Paré discovers the cracks in memory as she documents the search for her first best friend. The cracks in this lyrical puzzle are heightened by a very active and assertive poetic language that compels as it decodes the investigation of childhood memory and desire. The writing in First demonstrates a powerful juxtaposition of the continuous present with the continuous past." — Fred Wah

      "This brilliant collection revolves around firsts, especially a first friend, 'the impress of her never gone.' So too with these poems—tough, sweet and poignant, so surely rendered and musically rich—the impress of these poems never gone." — Lorna Crozier

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    Moldovan Hotel Leah Horlick Canada
    9781771315456 Paperback POETRY / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:April 01, 2021
    $20.00 CAD 5.7 x 8.4 x 0.5 in | 140 gr | 70 pages Carton Quantity:69 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2022 Raymond Souster Award Shortlist * 2022 Pat Lowther Memorial Award Shortlist

      Moldovan Hotel explores the intergenerational trauma of the Holocaust in Romania through a queer Jewish voice in the Diaspora.

      In 2017, Leah Horlick travelled to Romania to revisit the region her Jewish ancestors fled. What she unearthed there is an elaborate web connecting conscious worlds to subconscious ones, fascism to neofascisms, Europe to the Americas to the Middle East, typhus to HIV/AIDS, genocide in Romania to land grabs in Palestine, women's lives in farming villages to queer lives in the city, language to its trap doors, and love to its hidden, ancestral obligations.

      With force, clarity and searing craft, Horlick's poems are equal to the urgency of our political moment. "No one ever thinks they might be the dragon," Horlick writes, and yet history repeats its cruelties. This work takes things apart to put them profoundly back together.

      Bio

      Leah Horlick grew up as a settler on Treaty Six Cree territory and the homelands of the Métis in Saskatchewan. Her first collection of poetry, Riot Lung(Thistledown Press, 2012) was shortlisted for both a ReLit Award and a Saskatchewan Book Award. In 2016 she won the Dayne Ogilvie Prize, Canada's only award for LGBT emerging writers. That same year, her second collection, For Your Own Good (Caitlin Press, 2015), was named Stonewall Honor Title by the American Library Association. In 2018, her piece "You Are My Hiding Place" was named Poem of the Year by ARC Poetry Magazine and shortlisted for inclusion in the 44th Pushcart Prize by the Pushcart Board of Editors. She lives in Calgary.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Horlick opens Moldovan Hotel with the fantasy of ancestors of past loves in a room together, their historical associations and interactions problematizing identity, relationship, truth, and story. The poems that follow pirouette between past and present, real and imagined, beautifully rendered countryside and the echoes of loss that does not come from the inevitability of life but from the purposeful destruction of other, whether national, religious, or ethnic. Yet these poems, with their purposeful and arresting use of language, together form a prayer for a better world, built not on burying old crimes, but on looking closely to see the truth of the past and to expose it so that it cannot poison the future." — Jury Citation, 2022 Pat Lowther Memorial Award

      "In the masterful work of Moldovan Hotel, Leah Horlick lives not only a lineage, but a host of familial ghosts, each holding up a lantern, whispering of loss and landscape, of war and typhus, transforming the speaker into all of it—and the reader, with her—in surreal, linguistic leaps. Haunting details of the past, made visceral by the speaker's experience of the land her Jewish ancestors fled during World War II, become nightmare visions of the future as the jackboots of neo-fascism march ever forward and memories are confiscated by the CIA. Horlick's poems, making meaning of history with unflinching honesty, resonate electrically with our time." — Jury Citation, 2022 Raymond Souster Award

      "Every poem in Moldovan Hotel is a room thick with ghosts. Here, Horlick takes the language of the past—used to dehumanize and unmoor—and crystalizes it around revelation after revelation. A graceful, striking collection." — Carmen Maria Machado, author of In the Dream House

      "If Leah Horlick's second book invited us to witness, this time she draws from her Jewish heritage and takes us back to show us how to read the landscape and mind-scape and tell us what the texts left out. This is an accounting, a calling, an invocation, a return, a skilful mediation on how to remember when the 'names of the oppressors are blotted out'." — Juliane Okot Bitek, author of 100 Days

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    Sotto Voce Maureen Hynes Canada
    9781771315128 Paperback POETRY / LGBTQ+ Publication Date:September 15, 2019
    $20.00 CAD 5.9 x 8.7 x 0.5 in | 240 gr | 104 pages Carton Quantity:104 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Poems that give full attention to a world in shambles, a world in which ?mercy is failing.?

      Maureen Hynes, in her fifth book of poetry, speaks tenderly yet vehemently about the threatened worlds that concern her. From Toronto, where she lives and walks the city?s afflicted watershed, she turns her attention to the near and far, shifting it from the First Nations? stolen lands to Syria and the refugee crisis in the Mediterranean; from the deaths of family and friends to the newborns into whose care our endangered planet will pass; and from love?s transient regrets to the sustaining love two women share. Hynes? is a gaze that grieves quietly, delights humbly, and, in the search for solace, never rests. Each poem in Sotto Voce is a recitative of healing. Hear the music in every word and, despite the damaged environments Hynes gives voice to, be restored.

      This is a book that bears witness to the ?dynamite stick of injustice,? one that balances fear and hope, misfortune and renewal, calamity and natural beauty. Sotto Voce carries the complexity and seriousness of its themes lightly?it?s important to know when to speak loudly, and when to whisper.

      ??Sotto Voce is the sound of one of Canada?s most accomplished poets writing at the height of her powers.? ?Jim Johnstone

      "Whether speaking about nature, or politics, or love, Maureen Hynes does so with candor and compassion. These poems are generous and assured, and the world they circumscribe is the urgent, beautiful, dangerous place where we all live. Read Sotto Voce. Maureen Hynes is a poet at the top of her game.? ?Helen Humphreys

      Bio

      Maureen Hynes (www.maureenhynes.com) lives in Toronto. Her first book of poetry, Rough Skin (Wolsak and Wynn, 1995), won the League of Canadian Poets? Gerald Lampert Award for best first book of poetry by a Canadian. Her second collection, Harm?s Way (Brick Books, 2001), was followed by Marrow, Willow (Pedlar Press, 2011) and then The Poison Colour (Pedlar Press, 2015), which was a finalist for both the League of Canadian Poets? Pat Lowther Award and Raymond Souster Award. She is poetry editor for Our Times magazine.

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