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  • 1
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    The Taste of Longing Ethel Mulvany and Her Starving Prisoners of War Cookbook Suzanne Evans Canada
    9781771134897 Paperback HISTORY / Military Publication Date:September 21, 2020
    $28.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.75 in | 523 gr | 306 pages Carton Quantity:11 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      Half a world away from her home in Manitoulin Island, Ethel Mulvany is starving in Singapore’s infamous Changi Prison, along with hundreds of other women jailed there as POWs during the Second World War. They beat back pangs of hunger by playing decadent games of make-believe and writing down recipes filled with cream, raisins, chocolate, butter, cinnamon, ripe fruit – the unattainable ingredients of peacetime, of home, of memory.

      In this novelistic, immersive biography, Suzanne Evans presents a truly individual account of WWII through the eyes of Ethel – mercurial, enterprising, combative, stubborn, and wholly herself. The Taste of Longing follows Ethel through the fall of Singapore in 1942, the years of her internment, and beyond. As a prisoner, she devours dog biscuits and book spines, befriends spiders and smugglers, and endures torture and solitary confinement. As a free woman back in Canada, she fights to build a life for herself in the midst of trauma and burgeoning mental illness.

      Woven with vintage recipes and transcribed tape recordings, the story of Ethel and her fantastical POW Cookbook is a testament to the often-overlooked strength of women in wartime. It’s a story of the unbreakable power of imagination, generosity, and pure heart.

      Bio

      Dr. Suzanne Evans holds a PhD in Religious Studies. After working, studying, and living in China, Indonesia, India, and Vietnam, she now lives and writes in Ottawa. She is the author of Mothers of Heroes, Mothers of Martyrs: World War I and the Politics of Grief. Her writing, which has appeared in academic and literary journals, newspapers, magazines, and books, has a strong focus on women and war.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Award - Biography (Adult Nonfiction) 2020, Winner
      Taste Canada Award, Culinary Narratives 2021, Winner
      Ottawa Book Award, English Non-Fiction 2021, Winner
      Reviews

      Suzanne Evans’s important and compelling account of a gifted and courageous Manitoulin Island woman who wanted to make a difference is a page-turner. With sensitivity, craft, and imagination, Evans significantly expands our understanding of Canadian women’s contributions to our history.


      The book takes the reader on a vivid journey, following Ethel Mulvany from Manitoulin Island to the prison camp at Changi, Singapore, and back again. Evans combines meticulous research with a very readable writing style to create a sweeping narrative that touches on food history, the history of mental illness and its treatment, and the experiences of civilians and POWs during the Second World War.


      I loved every minute of The Taste of Longing. Evans has captured Ethel, and put her in context, not shirking (or misunderstanding!) those complex aspects of her character that both pushed her to greatness, but also ultimately caused her so much suffering at times. This is an “I-can’t-put-it-down” book, an historical biography that reads like a novel—an ordinary life made extraordinary through circumstance and an inordinate amount of courage.


      "Suzanne Evans brings a novelist’s eye and an historian’s diligence to the story of Ethel Mulvany, a small-town girl with audacious ambitions and boundless confidence who embarks on a quixotic tour of the Asian Pacific on the brink of WWII. Amid the perils of war, she proves a courageous and clever survivor, enduring imprisonment, starvation and torture during the war, and a creative and resourceful entrepreneur and benefactor in the life she rebuilds for herself in Canada after her liberation. In Suzanne Evans’ hands, Mulvany’s story becomes moving, inspiring and unforgettable."


      “As gripping as a novel, The Taste of Longing is infused with Suzanne Evans’ keen sense of psychology and language. Its plot is made all the more riveting by the historical facts of the deprivation of the prisoners of war in Changi Prison. Ethel was a remarkable and fearless woman. This vivid biography is also a uniquely female history, infused with nourishment no less important for being imaginary.”


      This is a story of hardship, cruelty, and disease—but also of endurance, indomitability, and friendship. Centred around a remarkable cookbook, Evans vividly recounts Ethel’s resilience and commemoration of the war that marked her for life.


      This is a story about an unusual woman in an unbearable situation. Evans has delved deep and written with great sympathy about the long drama of picking up the pieces of a broken life.


      A fascinating story that begs to be told. Ethel directs the voyage of her life from her anchor, rural Manitoulin Island, to Changi Prison, where her energy and creativity did much to sustain the bodies and spirits of the some 400 women and children interned there. Among her projects were imaginary teas and dinner parties, fashion shows and quilts, and most poignant of all, a cookbook of remembered recipes the women longed for.


      Ethel’s experiences are harrowing and sad, triumphant yet lonely, mesmerizing and horrific. In this page-turner, the sisterhood and traitors of the POW camp resonate off the page, with the added culinary delights and comfort foods of the afternoon teas of Changi Prison.


      The stories of what women contribute, suffer, and carry in wartime are rarely told. With original research and an elegant style, Evans allows us to see Ethel, to realize the price many women pay in conflicts, and to appreciate their resilience and grace. Such remarkable stories of Canadian women need to be told.

  • 2
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    Enemy Alien A True Story of Life Behind Barbed Wire Kassandra Luciuk Canada, nicole burton Canada
    9781771134729 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Nonfiction Publication Date:March 09, 2020
    $21.95 CAD 7.13 x 9.38 x 0.24 in | 266 gr | 96 pages Carton Quantity:56 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      This graphic history tells the story of Canada’s first national internment operations through the eyes of John Boychuk, an internee held in Kapuskasing from 1914 to 1917. The story is based on Boychuk’s actual memoir, which is the only comprehensive internee testimony in existence.

      The novel follows Boychuk from his arrest in Toronto to Kapuskasing, where he spends just over three years. It details the everyday struggle of the internees in the camp, including forced labour and exploitation, abuse from guards, malnutrition, and homesickness. It also documents moments of internee agency and resistance, such as work slowdowns and stoppages, hunger strikes, escape attempts, and riots.

      Little is known about the lives of the incarcerated once the paper trail stops, but Enemy Alien subsequently traces Boychuk’s parole, his search for work, his attempts to organize a union, and his ultimate settlement in Winnipeg. Boychuk’s reflections emphasize the much broader context in which internment takes place. This was not an isolated incident, but rather part and parcel of Canadian nation building and the directives of Canada’s settler colonial project.

      Bio

      Kassandra Luciuk is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Her work explores how changing notions of Canadian citizenship interacted with ethnic identity during the Cold War. In a broader sense, her research interests include Canada, migration/ethnicity, state formation, and nationalism.



      nicole marie burton is a comic book and children’s book illustrator based in Ontario. With over a decade of experience in activist art and design, she is a founding member of the Ad Astra Comix publishing collective, which specializes in comics with social justice themes. Her published work includes The Beast: Making a Living on a Dying Planet, The Boy Who Walked Backwards, and a chapter in the anthology Drawn to Change: Graphic Histories of Working Class Struggle.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      KOBZAR Book Award 2022, Short-listed
      Reviews

      "This graphic novel tells a great story in an innovative format which is a ‘spot-on reflection’ of the Ukrainian-Canadian experience. The material was presented with integrity and in a format accessible to a wide audience.”


      “In legend, the First World War marked the birth of Canada. In reality, it represented the apogee of one brutally militarized version of a particular vision of ‘Anglo Canada.’ Vividly told from the perspective of Ukrainians detained in concentration camps, and then sent as forced labourers to Cape Breton, Enemy Alien brilliantly reveals both how these men were victimized as ‘aliens’—and how they stubbornly resisted as flesh-and-blood human beings.”


      “Expertly narrated and beautifully illustrated, Enemy Alien has much to teach us about the injustices of war, internment, and political repression, past and present.”


      “This bleak moment in Canadian history should be part of our children’s history lessons. Kassandra Luciuk has done a wonderful job bringing this historical event to life.”


      “A vivid slice of Canadian history told in innovative comic-book style. Enemy Alien presents a powerful vindication of immigrants who, then and now, contribute to building a better Canada.”


      “All the more troubling for being a true account of the crippling legacy of Canada’s first national internment operations, Enemy Alien obliges us to look at an injustice that left its victims afraid to speak of what they had endured, even as Ottawa’s men tried to erase this history. An evocatively graphic refutation of their ploy and a unique portrayal of a wrong once almost deleted from our national conscience.”


      “Haunting, infuriating, illuminating, inspiring, and gorgeously illustrated, this graphic history, based on a never-before-available memoir, tells the story of a young Ukrainian immigrant who, dubbed an enemy alien, experienced first-hand the brutality of incarceration during his internment by the Canadian state during the First World War. The mystery of the memoir’s narrator—an unknown man and an everyman, disillusioned with the supposed pillars of western democracy—leads to a clarity of insight that will resonate with many readers and stimulate plenty of debate. At a time when the world is seething with intense anti-migrant racism, this is a timely, must-read history.”


      “The illustrated world of Enemy Alien rings so true, in all its black, white and many greys. It’s a gift to our understanding of Canada and of ourselves.”


      Enemy Alien is a powerful and superbly illustrated examination of internment during World War One. nicole marie burton’s haunting drawings skillfully complement the words of the anonymous author, and Kassandra Luciuk’s introductory essay provides important historical context. This book is a welcome addition to the growing field of graphic history.”


      “This is an altogether remarkable graphic novel, a close study of a tragedy for the Ukrainians and for Canadian society at large, recounted vividly. A memorable work.”

  • 3
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    A Chance to Fight Hitler A Canadian Volunteer in the Spanish Civil War David Goutor Canada
    9781771133951 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Military Publication Date:October 09, 2018
    $26.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.5 in | 280 gr | 272 pages Carton Quantity:54 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      In late 1936, as Franco’s armies stormed toward Madrid, Stalin famously termed the defence of Spain “the common cause of all advanced and progressive mankind.” As a German emigrant to Winnipeg, Hans Ibing recognized the importance of the Spanish Civil War to the struggle against worldwide fascism in a way that most people in Canada did not—joining the International Brigades in their fight to defend the Spanish Republic was his “chance to fight Hitler.”

      Drawing on interviews, Ibing’s personal papers, and archival material, David Goutor recounts the powerful story of an ordinary man’s response to extraordinary times.

      Bio

      David Goutor is assistant professor in the School of Labour Studies, McMaster University. He researches and teaches about working-class formation, union and leftist movements, immigration, and transnational migratory labour systems.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      A readable, well-rounded account with good illustrations, and I found myself engaged in the story from beginning to end.


      This is an intimate, intelligent, and finely wrought portrayal of one Canadian’s role in the Spanish Civil War and the great struggle against fascism in the twentieth century.


      What Hans Ibing tells us of his dramatic and unique experience in Spain is an important addition to the recorded history of the Canadian volunteers who went to fight fascism. Just as compelling is his story of immigration, and personal odyssey in the aftermath of the war – a colourful thread in the fabric of this country’s social history over five decades.


      A Chance to Fight Hitler deftly explores one man’s engagement with some of the great struggles of the twentieth century, notably the unemployment crisis of the 1930s in the Canadian West, the popularization of left-wing movements amid the Great Depression, the fight to defeat fascism in Spain, and conflicts on Canada’s home front during the Second World War. Through the combined insights of Ibing and Goutor we see vividly the exciting possibilities, as well as the limitations, of the Communist movement.


      Goutor’s book is a good read. He’s married to Hans Ibing’s granddaughter and had ready access to his memories. The civil war in Spain was a key event in Ibing’s life and a seminal chapter in the evolution of trade union and socialist political action in Canada and across the industrial world. It is particularly relevant now that labour, environmental and anti-war activists need to work together to stop the further spread of neo-fascist politicians.


      David Goutor’s biography adds to our growing knowledge of the role of Canadians in the important and still very much contested history of the Spanish Civil War. The often altruistic, “premature anti-fascist” volunteers found themselves entrenched in the opening salvos of the fierce battle soon to engulf the world.

  • 4
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    The Vimy Trap or, How We Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Great War Ian McKay Canada, Jamie Swift Canada
    9781771132756 Paperback HISTORY / Military Publication Date:October 27, 2016
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1 in | 611 gr | 392 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”— today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

      Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a powerful probe of commemoration cultures. This subtle, fast-paced work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

      Bio

      Ian McKay is the L.R. Wilson Chair in Canadian History at McMaster University and the author of the award-winning Reasoning Otherwise: Leftists and the People’s Enlightenment in Canada, 1890–1920 and the co-author of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.



      Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books. He works on social justice issues for the Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing 2017, Short-listed
      The Canadian Historical Association Best Scholarly Book in Canadian History Prize 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Well-written and researched, and supplemented by a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, the authors present clear and valid arguments.


      The Vimy Trap is openly (and refreshingly) polemical, well researched, and lucid in its cultural criticism and is likely to disrupt the martial celebrations of Vimy’s 100th anniversary.


      Complicated arguments are presented throughout with nuance and clarity.

  • 5
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    The Land's Long Reach Valerie Mills-Milde Canada
    9781771335096 Paperback FICTION / Historical Publication Date:May 15, 2018
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.61 in | 350 gr | 270 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry and Fiction Series
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      Description

      It is The War to End All Wars, and Ena Connelly, a keenly sensory and extraordinary woman, is newly married and living on an Ontario farm. The shock of violence in far-off battlefields is echoed in a terror much closer to hand. With bold perception and remarkable self-reliance, Ena faces a dramatically altered world. Ena is self-contained, and careful not to reach too far into the turbulent emotional lives of others. As the war progresses, Ena forms a fierce bond of loyalty for Blain, the delightful but (necessarily) duplicitous boy who comes to work for her. Through Blain, she learns to extend herself in unexpected ways-- to reach outside of herself, and to risk. Ena also grows closer to her sister-in-law, Sarah, a gifted painter. Sarah is unafraid of confronting emotional turmoil and passion but she doesn't have Ena's absolute clarity of purpose and aim. Ena helps Sarah move closer to the life she wants, while Sarah opens Ena to a terrible and essential kind of beauty. When studying Sarah's paintings, Ena comments that it is not the surface that matters, but rather what is underneath. The same is true of this novel -- underneath the meticulous detail of daily life is the emotional landscape of persistent, courageous women, watching the violence of war in Europe (World War I) and domestic violence closer to home.

      Bio

      Valerie Mills-Milde lives, works, and writes in London Ontario. She is the author of the novel After Drowning (2016), and her short fiction has appeared in numerous Canadian literary magazines. When she is not writing, she is a clinical social worker in private practice.

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  • 6
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    9781771336253 Paperback FICTION / Thrillers Publication Date:June 10, 2019
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 1 in | 453 gr | 176 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      Where I Fall, Where She Rises is a novel that follows two women on opposite ends of a terrorist kidnapping. While one woman suffers and falls at the hands of her captors, the other exploits the fame of such a publicized event to secure a future for her unborn child. Lea Ironstone is a Canadian freelance journalist who recalls her time spent in the very dangerous red zone of Baghdad, after the 2003 U.S. invasion. A self-destructive addict, she refuses to relegate herself to the safer green zone, where most mainstream news journalists like Paul Shell are protected. Desperately seeking a more controversial story to re-establish his fame as a television journalist for GNN, Paul Shell contacts Lea and agrees to meet her in the red zone for a recent finding. They are kidnapped by an insurgent terrorist sect and tortured repeatedly. Carol Shell, Paul Shell's wife lives in New York. Eight months pregnant, Carol is approached by Timothy Abel, her husband's agent. Timothy wishes to represent her "victimhood," which he sees as a very marketable and exploitable asset. Her appetite for fame and celebrity eclipses her familial priorities and she is coerced into a lifestyle that hinges on personal promotion. Lea and Paul find themselves incarcerated in a basement dungeon expecting their next "artistic" torture, while Carol makes her next public appearance to further her star. Lea and Paul's relationship evolves into a mutual understanding of their united fate, while Carol, on the other side of the world, rises in public stature. The novel evolves into an emotional satire, which depicts two strong women who attack the consequences of war on two different fronts.

      Bio

      Dean Serravalle is the author of the novels Reliving Charley and Chameleon (Days), a national award-winning teacher, and the founder of Writers4peace, a non-profit organization which aims to mentor students interested in publishing writing aimed at social justice issues. He lives in Niagara Falls, Ontario.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "A gripping exploration of two remarkable women navigating two very different sides of a nightmare scenario. Brimming with psychological intrigue and deeply ambiguous moral choices, this is the work of an author with a keen sense of what it is to have our very humanity put to the test."
      --Bruce Geddes, author of The Higher the Monkey Climbs

      "A difficult journey exploring both the struggle of survival and what it means to be alive."--Brad Kelln, author of the Blake Waiter Mystery Series

      "Dean Serravalle has painted a crystalline image of the conflicted human condition. Here every truth is spoken, though some louder than the rest."
      --Susan Lloy, author of Vita

  • 7
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    Look After Her Hannah Brown Canada
    9781771336734 Paperback FICTION / Historical Publication Date:September 30, 2019
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 1 in | 280 gr | 448 pages Carton Quantity:16 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      Finalist for the 2019 Foreword Indie Award for General Fiction.

      Upon the death of their art-loving parents, thirteen and fourteen year old Jewish sisters are kidnapped by a family friend and taken to a brothel. There they are held captive by their shared shame and by the younger sister's forced addiction to morphine. Love and psychodrama gives them the courage to finally escape Vienna. Once in England, however, Hedy discovers her younger sister Susannah longs to be independent-- and in Italy. But in 1938, despite the safety they each have found among the privileged, they return to Vienna just before Hitler arrives, putting their own lives and those of two children in danger. With the background of anti-Semitism and exploitation, of sex and love and art and dramatic ruses, all during the terrifying rise of fascism in Austria and Italy, Look After Her reveals this truth: no matter how close we are to another human being, even a beloved sister, that's what we are: close-- we all have our own secrets to keep.

      Bio

      Hannah Brown is a prize-winning screenwriter who happily taught film and English at the college and collegiate levels. A return to writing full-time resulted in poems, short stories, blogs, and essays appearing in many North American literary magazines, and a short story "The Happiness" was nominated for the 2016 Journey prize. She lives near the lake in the Beaches neighborhood of Toronto. Look After Her is Hannah's debut novel.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Foreword Indie Awards (General Fiction) 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews

      "Packed with action and intrigue, and impeccably paced, Hannah Brown's debut novel Look After Her is a gripping, accomplished piece of feminist historical fiction..."
      --Room Magazine

      "Here is a voice poignant and alive, offering unusual insights in scintillating dialogue. To leave the last page of this work is to re-enter the world you thought you always knew but which you now recognize anew in Hedy and Susannah. Make no mistake: this is because you have been guided by an author whose rare gift is that of surprise, a manner of holding the reader in generative uncertainty. Hannah Brown's debut novel Look After Her calls us into the challenge and promise of its pulse and world well beyond the that last, utterly-earned page."
      --Canisia Lubrin, author of Voodoo Hypothesis

      "Hannah Brown's debut novel, Look After Her brings sex, sisters, and psychodrama to a story that will leave you haunted."
      --Jess Taylor, author of Just Pervs

      "An ambitious and accomplished debut novel, Look After Her follows sisters Hedy and Susannah as they liberate themselves and build new lives against the backdrop of a world marching inexorably to war. Superbly well-paced, the novel evokes a sense of time and place so strong you can taste the Viennese chocolat mit schlag and the Italian espresso, and feel a chilly London winter in your bones."
      --Terri Favro, author of Once Upon a Time in West Toronto

  • 8
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    9781771337250 Paperback FICTION / Historical Publication Date:August 30, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.69 in | 350 gr | 248 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      The House of Izieu is a novel inspired by the life and experiences of Sabine Zlatin who, as a Jew using a fake identity, managed to find families to care for Jewish children who were in French refugee camps. She created a safe home for a number of other children called "The House of Izieu" which is now a museum. Unfortunately, she was not able to save the 44 children in her care. After one wonderful year of freedom in that house they were discovered, and Klaus Barbie ordered their deportation to Auschwitz where they were killed. Sabine's husband was also caught with two teenage boys he was helping escape and was also eventually killed. Sabine, suffering from loss and the guilt of not having saved the children, manages to continue contributing to the underground efforts as well as efforts to reunite people after the war's end.

      Bio

      Jan Rehner lives in Toronto and recently retired as University Professor from the Writing Department at York University. She has published four previous novels, Just Murder (2003), winner of the 2004 Arthur Ellis Award for Best First Crime Novel in Canada; On Pain of Death (2007), 2008 winner, IPPY Bronze Medal; Missing Matisse (2011); and Almost True (2018). Her current novel, The House of Izieu, based on an actual event in World War II, is a moving account of the heroic efforts of Sabine Zlatin and a small group of friends to save the lives of Jewish children hiding from Nazi persecution. When she is not writing, Jan enjoys travelling and photography.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Jan Rehner's novel The House of Izieu grabs you by the heart and doesn't let go. It's a wrenching portrait of a secret children's refuge in war-torn France, where, for a time, joy replaces horror, and love brutality. Jan Rehner's prose sings. The characters she spins are captivating, in particular the children. They are rendered so fully and intimately, their voices so pure, their personal histories so tragic, that readers will want to crawl right into the pages to comfort them. This story of selflessness and bravery is impossible to put down, and impossible to forget."
      --Phyllis Rudin, author of Evie, the Baby and the Wife and My True and Complete Adventures as a Wannabe Voyageur

      "In this moving, earnest novel, Jan Rehner traces the inner and outer journeys of Sabine Zlatin, a courageous woman who risked her life during the Holocaust to try and save 44 children. Rehner, relying on historical accounts including Zlatin's own postwar testimony, brings to life in heartfelt detail this harrowing, tragic, and inspiring story."
      --Nora Gold, author of The Dead Man and Fields of Exile

      "Jan Rehner's elegiac narrative of a chapter of the Holocaust in France fulfills a sacred obligation: to commemorate and honour the life-affirming presence of the orphaned children and their adult caregivers whose lives were brutally stolen, and whose hopes for a future were expunged during the Nazi terror. Through the plural voices and the interweaving narrative lines Rehner reimagines, we share sensory, trauma-laden memories of the pre-war past, the pleasure taken in attending to the natural world in an idyllic countryside setting, a sense of a play so inherent in childhood, post-war survival, and retribution. Alongside the small joys afforded the children, there lives in each character incalculable loss, suspended temporarily in the fragile shelter of the House of Izieu. Dramatic irony intensifies as we come to know, in fleeting measure, the children and adults compelled to play their part in the tragedy which took place some seventy-five years ago in rural Vichy France. I was deeply moved by this book."
      --Carol Lipszyc, author of The Saviour Shoes and Other Stores

  • 9
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    Daria Irene Marques
    9781771338417 Paperback FICTION / Women Publication Date:June 24, 2021
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.8 in | 0.65 lb | 340 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
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      Description

      When a young woman is subjected to a violent attack, the impact of colonialism, patriarchy, and who we choose to love are thrown into sharp relief. Daria is an immigrant woman living in Toronto, and as she begins to tell her story, the reader is pulled into different worlds, travelling to various timeframes and locations in an unending awe-inspiring Matryoshka play, where one story leads to another and another and another. The novel explores the stories of multiple characters?the Indo-Portuguese-Canadian sexual predator; the idealist and resilient Mozambican freedom fighter; the wondrous Iberian Roma circus; the Christianized Muslims and Jews; the mystical Nubian master who knows how to capture black matter; the fascist dictator whose ruthless cousin delivers unthinkable punishments inside the closed walls of Tarrafal, the infamous Cape Verdean prison of the Portuguese colonial regime?and countless other personalities, some wretched, some redeemable, some otherworldly, who defend visions and ideals and fight for dignity, power, and recognition.

      Moving back and forth between Canada, Portugal, Mozambique, and Cape Verde, Daria is a magical realism historical novel where fact and fiction intermingle to create a spellbinding world of complex political, familial, and cultural dynamics.

      Bio

      Irene Marques is a bilingual writer (English and Portuguese) and Lecturer at Ryerson University in the English Department, where she teaches literature and creative writing. She holds a PhD in Comparative Literature, a Masters in French Literature and Comparative Literature and a BA (Hon.) in French Language and Literature all from the University of Toronto?and a Bachelor of Social Work from Ryerson University. Her literary publications include the poetry collections Wearing Glasses of Water (2007), The Perfect Unravelling of the Spirit (2012), and The Circular Incantation: An Exercise in Loss and Findings (2013); the Portuguese language short-story collection Habitando na Metáfora do Tempo: Crónicas Desejadas (2009) and the novel My House is a Mansion (2015). Her academic publications include, among others, the manuscript Transnational Discourses on Class, Gender and Cultural Identity, and numerous articles in international journals or scholarly collectives, including African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society; Research in African Literatures; A Companion to Mia Couto; Letras & Letras; InterDISCIPLINARY: Journal of Portuguese Diaspora Studies; African Studies; and Portuguese Studies Review. Her Portuguese-language novel, Uma Casa no Mundo, won the 2019 Imprensa Nacional/Ferreira de Castro Prize and is now published by Imprensa Nacional Casa da Moeda. She lives in Toronto. www.irenemarques.net

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Irene Marques is a brilliant novelist and storyteller. She is endowed with the gift of creating characters and narrating their stories over time and space. Daria is a cerebral novel about Portuguese identity, family, immigration, displacement, and remembering. Personal and poetic, Irene Marques' aching narrative is a masterpiece of contemporary Portuguese-Canadian fiction, a meditation on human experience in Portugal, Canada, and the former Portuguese colonial empire. It is a necessary book for anyone interested in women's struggles within and outside of patriarchy, dictatorship, colonialism, anticolonialism, immigration, neoliberalism, and globalization. Daria is a novel that conveys the dreams and the wisdom of those who left home and country."
      ?Isabel A. Ferreira Gould, independent scholar

      "Brilliant and captivating, the novel Daria provides a look into the struggles and triumphs of being in a new land. Irene Marques' writing moves extraordinarily between countries and she masterfully creates scenes of beauty and horror, happiness and sadness and, above all, hope and resilience. Books like this offer the world and invite us to experience other lives. This moving tale of dreams and healing will leave you yearning for the journey to continue long after the last word."
      ?Sonia Saikaley, author of The Allspice Bath

      In Daria, Irene Marques paints a sprawling canvas of interconnected narratives whose settings range from present-day Canada to a village in Portugal's Beira Alta region to colonial-era Mozambique and the Portuguese prison camp in Tarrafal, Cabo Verde. By turns transcendently lyrical and unsparingly brutal, the novel spins together stories within stories, intricately woven dreams, and fantastic visions as it follows its protagonist on her immigrant journey."
      ? Anna M. Klobucka , Professor of Portuguese and Women's and Gender Studies, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    9781771338639 Paperback FICTION / Women Publication Date:June 03, 2021
    $22.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.7 in | 0.6 lb | 240 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Inanna Poetry & Fiction Series
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      It's 1942, and the Nazi Juggernaut continues to crush Europe, while on the island of Newfoundland the loss of a generation awaits. Two girls who are best friends heading into their last year of high school visit a local park?and their lives are changed forever. The beautiful, talented Angela faces loss and then a darkness, a darkness so shameful that she cannot share it with anyone, not even her best friend. Dorothy faces the prospect of becoming the island's first "lady lawyer," one who offers hope for women seeking salvation from the chauvinism that dominates domestic life. A fearless examination of the monumental barriers that have stood in the way of women, My Best Friend Was Angela Bennett is a story of how a friendship endures through the most difficult of times.

      Bio

      Suzanne Hillier was born in St. John's, NF., before Confederation with Canada, and before the start of WWII. She graduated from McGill University with a BA in social sciences and attended graduate school in Columbia University in New York. She married and moved to Toronto, where she obtained a teaching certificate, an MA in literature from the University of Toronto, and where she also taught for several years. She started law school in 1968 and graduated in 1972, the year of her husband's death. She opened her own law practice in 1974, retired in 2005, and started writing. Her fiction has been published in various North American periodicals. Sonja & Carl was published by Brindle & Glass Publishing in 2017; My Best Friend Was Angela Bennett is her second novel. She currently divides her time between Caledon, Ontario, and the Southern California Desert.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "With searing clarity and poignant insight, Suzanne Hillier takes readers deep into one woman's personal hell. My Best Friend Was Angela Bennett is a transformational exploration of abuse, sadism, shame, entrapment, and injustice. This tragic account of why one woman stays sheds light on the psychological and physical horrors of domestic violence. A truly harrowing journey."
      ?Angie Abdou, author of The Bone Cage

      "If you're always looking for another book to read, as I am, this is a brilliant choice. What engaging storytelling! Suzanne Hillier is overdue to burst on the literary scene."
      ?Adair Lara, former columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle

      "Suzanne Hillier's My Best Friend Was Angela Bennett is a fierce, provocative novel about love, loyalty, and survival. With exacting, often witty prose, Hillier explores a time and place of narrow expectations for women and the chasm spousal abuse creates between friends. This novel is harrowing, funny, tender, unforgettable. It will stay with you."
      ?Libby Creelman, author of Walking in Paradise

      "An unflinching, often searing, account of two women's lives and enduring friendship in Smallwood-era Newfoundland."
      ?Ed Riche, author of Rare Birds

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