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  • 1
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    Exile Blues Douglas Gary Joseph Freeman
    9781771862004 Paperback FICTION / African American & Black On Sale Date:November 01, 2019
    $24.95 CAD 152.4 x 228.6 x 20.32 mm | 1.02 lb | 380 pages Carton Quantity:32 Baraka Books
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      When Preston Downs, Jr., alias Prez, slides down the emergency chute onto the frozen tarmac at the Montreal airport, little does he know that returning home to Washington D.C. or to his adopted city, Chicago, would now be impossible. Events had sped by after a dust-up with the Chicago police. With a new name and papers, he finds himself in a foreign city where people speak French and life is douce compared to the one he fled. Son of a World War II vet, Prez grows up in the 50s in D.C., a segregated Southern city, and learns early that black lives don’t much matter. As a leader in the streets, his journey from boyhood to manhood means acquiring fighting skills to lead and unify long before losing his virginity. Smart and skeptical, but with a code of ethics, he, like every black kid, wants to be Malcolm, Martin or at least a “soul brother,” which inspires fear among the powers that be. Spotted while an A student at Howard University in 1964, Prez is invited to do an interdisciplinary course with field work on Civil Rights in Chicago, a city as divided as Gettysburg was a hundred years earlier. Faced with police-state conditions, dubious armed gangs, spies and provocateurs, Prez and the young women and men he works with are propelled into a head-on fight with police. James Baldwin wrote that the blues began "on the auction block," others say it started with their kidnapping from Africa. Prez was born in exile, with the blues. Only someone who has lived through that period can write an enthralling and passionate story like Exile Blues. Gary Freeman has done so with insight and sensitivity.
      Bio
      Douglas Gary Joseph Freeman is an African American now living in Canada. First-born child of Joseph Pannell Sr., a WWII Naval veteran, and Pauline Adams whose grandmother was born into slavery, he grew up in Washington, D.C., a segregated city know for police brutality. As a high school student he became involved in the Civil Rights movement and then at Howard University turned to Revolutionary Black Nationalism. Frederick Douglass was his first hero, but Malcolm X and Martin Luther King forged his ideological development and political activism, which led him to Chicago where he worked with a local South Side African American organization. Targeted by Chicago’s Red Squad for elimination, he had to fight for his life on a South Side street. The gun-battle that ensued left an officer wounded and the author wounded and in prison. The author began a long quest for justice which weathered repeated and renewed threats to his life. He fled to Canada “illegally” and became Douglas Gary Joseph Freeman. Married with four children, he worked chiefly as a library professional He was arrested on July 27, 2004 on an extradition warrant. After an 11-year successful struggle for justice, he was returned home to Canada in January 2015.
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      “Once all monarchies and then-or-now fascistic states, the European-Caucasian-majority duchies claim to be God’s chosen, egalitarian democracies. Yet, to be born black (or Turtle Island Indigenous) in any of these republics or constitutional monarchies is to be born, exiled from true citizenship. That’s the thesis of this gripping, true-to-life novel. Detailing genocidal police warfare against black youths and men in Washington, D.C. (a.k.a. 'Dixie'), and Chicago, Exile Blues is also the coming-of-age story of Preston Downs, Jr., 'Prez,' whose nickname highlights his slick, executive-privilege style of analysis, fisticuffs, and romance. Prez 'out-clevers' the paleface, ghoulish, guns-always-drawn racism of the U.S. capital, and slips the homicidal grasp of Chicago’s KKK-like cops, to escape to Montréal ('P.Q.'—back then, not yet 'QC'). But 1969 Montréal is in revolutionary ferment, and Prez finds himself navigating a maze of Black Panthers, Algerian nationalists, and FLQ radicals, all while trying to stabilize his love-life. Exile Blues is as cinematic, fast-paced, and action-packed as a classic, Blaxploitation flick. It’s the novel Malcolm X might have written had he not suffered martyrdom.” — George Elliott Clarke, Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate (2016-17), author of George & Rue

      "Exile Blues is fictionalized autobiography at its best. It is a novel but the central facts detail the author’s actual experiences of police racism in Washington D.C. and Chicago in the 1950’s and the 1960’s and his flight to Montreal to avoid prosecution. Freeman ('Prez' in the book) utilizes the freedom of a novel to re-create scenes that provide deeper understanding and have greater impact than would be possible in an autobiography. Exile Blues is a very engrossing book that gives fascinating insights into life in black ghettos in the United States" — Peter Rosenthal, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Toronto and retired lawyer

      "Exile Blues could be one of the most important Black History novels to appear in recent years."—James Fisher, The Miramichi Reader

      "To read Exile Blues is to step into the US of the 50s and 60s, to engage with African-American youth at the frontlines of fighting and protesting for freedom and equal rights... an engaging and multi-faceted narrative of survival and strength."—Terese Mason Pierre, Quill & Quire

      "Born Joseph Pannell in Washington, D.C., Freeman grew up in the early years of the American civil rights struggle. While working in Chicago’s South Side in the 1960s, he became part of that struggle, an outspoken activist targeted by the Red Squad, a division of the Chicago police department. He fled the United States in 1969, after shooting a police officer in self defence, thinking he would never be able to return. He eventually settled in Toronto, where he married, raised a family, and worked as a librarian. (We should take a moment here to appreciate the significance of the name he adopted during this exile.) He was arrested in 2004 outside the Toronto Reference Library on Yonge Street, and was held without bail for four years as he fought extradition. Eventually agreeing to face charges in the United States — for which he was exonerated — he then spent seven years trapped in the U.S. as he fought for re-entry to Canada. He was eventually allowed to return from this new exile in 2015. Freeman’s new book, Exile Blues, delineates the roots of those exiles, and documents the gradual understanding of the nature of race relations in the United States. Framed as a novel, one will find oneself unavoidably reading the book as a pseudo-memoir. Or, perhaps better, a spiritual autobiography. Exile Blues begins with Preston Downs Junior’s arrival in icy Montreal in the winter of 1968. He is taken in by a community of dissidents and revolutionaries, and begins to build a life in exile. When a figure from his past appears, however, readers are taken on a journey through his early years, his childhood, the loss of his father and friends, his growing awareness of the world around him and his place within it. And, most crucially, what he believes he must do to change that world. The framing sequences in Montreal are beautifully wrought, and brought to vivid life. As one might expect, the substantial flashbacks to his earlier life are handled differently, with a broad approach which, ultimately, suggests a foundational mythology, the recounted life as origin story. The disconnect between these approaches is occasionally frustrating, but Exile Blues quickly becomes a compelling read. More significantly, it has the air of an important read, a vivid exploration of an era which continues to shape not only individuals like Freeman, but an entire culture, one which — as Pannell has demonstrated — easily transcends borders." —Robert Wiersema, The Toronto Star

      “exceptional and moving… (Freeman) writes with passion about fighting injustice in U.S.A. and his struggle to find peace and security in Canada.”—Richard King, CBC (Montreal)
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    9781771862431 Paperback FICTION / Satire Publication Date:June 01, 2021
    $24.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.6 in | 220 gr | 208 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Baraka Books
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      Bio

      Ishmael Reed is a poet, novelist, essayist, playwright and songwriter. He has won prizes and grants in each category. He is also an illustrator and Jazz pianist. His most recent awards include the Alberto Dubito Award for International Poetry, presented at the Ca?Foscari University in Venice in 2016 and The AUDELCO award for theater presented in 2017. In 2019, he began his 36th year as a professor at The University of California at Berkeley. He also teaches at the California College of the Arts where he is a distinguished professor. His most recent books published by Baraka Books are Why No Confederate Statues in Mexico (2019) and The Complete Muhammad Ali (2015).

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      Awards
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      “For half a century, Ishmael Reed?s been American literature?s most fearless satirist, waging a cultural forever war against the media that spans a dozen novels, nine plays and essay collections, and hundreds of poems” The New Yorker

      “ The Terrible Fours is as funny as Richard Pryor, as sacrilegious as Lenny Bruce and as clever as Mark Twain.” Ron Jacobs Counterpunch

      “Mr. Reed is as close as we are likely to get to a Garcia Marquez, elaborating his own mythology even as he trashes ours. ”

      “ Ishmael Reed is the Charlie Parker of American fiction. ” Max Roach

      “ Reed has an unnerving sense of what will show up on our televisions. He is without a doubt our finest satirist since Twain. ” Book World

  • 3
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    Bigotry on Broadway 1st edition Ishmael Reed, Carla Blank
    9781771862561 Paperback PERFORMING ARTS / Theater Publication Date:September 01, 2021
    $24.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.5 in | 230 gr | 200 pages Carton Quantity:42 Canadian Rights: Y Baraka Books
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      How do intellectuals and scholars feel about how members of their ethnic groups are portrayed on Broadway? How would we know? Very few of them have the power to rate which plays and musicals are worthy and which ones are flops, and above all, be heard or read. The American critical fraternity is an exclusive club.

      Carla Blank and Ishmael Reed invited informed and accomplished writers, women and man, who are rarely heard from to comment about how ethnic groups are depicted on Broadway. The contributors are Lonely Christopher, Tommy Curry, Jack Foley, Emil Guillermo, Claire J. Harris, Yuri Kageyama, Soraya McDonald, Nancy Mercado, Aimee Phan, Elizabeth Theobold Richards, Shawn Wong and David Yearsley, in addition to the editors. Under review are Madame Butterfly, the Irving Berlin songbook, Oklahoma, South Pacific, Miss Saigon, Flower Drum Song, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, The Color Purple, The Book of Mormon, West Side Story and Hamilton.

      All of these musicals received enthusiastic reviews from the exclusive club of media critics. With Bigotry on Broadway, readers will get the views of those who have been excluded from the club. They will find themselves asking, ?Why has it taken so long??

      Bio

      Ishmael Reed is an award-winning poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, songwriter, public media commentator, lecturer and publisher. His play on the Broadway musical Hamilton, The Haunting of Lin-Manuel Miranda, garnered three 2019 AUDELCO awards and was published by Archway Editions in October 2020. The Terrible Fours, the third novel in the Terribles trilogy, was published in June 2021. Founder of the Before Columbus Foundation, he is a MacArthur Fellow and holds the 2020 Berkeley Distinguished Emeritus Award.


      Carla Blank is a writer, director, dramaturge and editor. She co-authored Storming the Old Boys? Citadel: Two Pioneer Women Architects of Nineteenth Century North America, with Tania Martin. She is author and editor of the 20th century historical reference Rediscovering America: The Making of Multicultural America, 1900-2000. Her two-volume anthology of performing arts techniques and styles, Live on Stage! , was co-authored with Jody Roberts. She co-edited with Ishmael Reed the anthology Powwow: Charting the Fault Lines in the American Experience, Short Fiction, From Then to Now. She lives in Oakland, California.

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      Awards
      Reviews

      “Insightful essays and interviews examine how white power structures on Broadway have shaped musical theater's representations of Black, Indigenous, and people of color, or led to their absence ... A book for all readers interested in the history of Broadway musicals, theater criticism, and the role of whiteness in Broadway's misrepresentations. ” Amy Lewontin Library Journal

      “For half a century, Ishmael Reed?s been American literature?s most fearless satirist, waging a cultural forever war against the media that spans a dozen novels, nine plays and essay collections, and hundreds of poems” The New Yorker


      On Powwow: Charting the Fault Lines of the American Experience?Short Fiction from Then to Now“AReed and Blank have selected molten and magical tales that dramatically explore the consequences of our attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality?. this is a live-wire, from-sea-to-shining-sea collection in which we hear America singing.” Donna Seaman Booklist


      “Highly recommended” Gene Shaw, Library Journal“A captivating, multifarious look at the American experience through its short fiction.” Publishers Weekly


      On Rediscovering America: the Making of Multicultural America, 1900-2000 written and edited by Carla Blank


      “The text thus showcases Americans of color, women, immigrants, and others who shaped our country's history but have often been marginalized?. an effective, valuable historical reference work. ”

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      “A [Ishmael Reed] is the purest literary troublemaker we currently have? a book that is arresting? always-bracing and readable. ” ? Jeff Simon, Buffalo News


      “A Since the mid-twentieth century, Ishmael Reed has been deep, abrasive, and didactic, an iconoclastic champion of what is ?good? and a formidable critic of what is ?bad? in domestic and transnational affairs. Reed is a fighter, a battered but undefeated fighter.” Jerry Ward Jr.


      “A That?s what I loved about Baldwin, something that I am inspired by about Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Gwendolyn Brooks?they were all darlings of the liberal establishment, and they rejected that status, which meant they were pushed to the margins.” Cornell West


      “A One of our greatest writers.” Brian Flota, The Hairsplitter


      “A Just when you think that Reed is exaggerating, or being one-dimensional in his analysis of racial issues, he?ll open another page of American history and show you something new.” ? David Homel, Montreal Review of Books


      “A With Ishmael Reed, the most persistent myths and prejudice crumble under powerful unrelenting jabs and razor-sharp insight. ” Le Devoir, Montreal

  • 4
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    Moving Against the System The 1968 Congress of Black Writers and the Making of Global Consciousness David Austin Canada
    9781771133890 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Black Studies (Global) Publication Date:September 07, 2018
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.6 in | 470 gr | 304 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      In 1968, as protests shook France and war raged in Vietnam, the giants of Black radical politics descended on Montreal to discuss the unique challenges and struggles facing their brothers and sisters. For the first time since 1968, David Austin brings alive the speeches and debates of the most important international gathering of Black radicals of the era.

      Against a backdrop of widespread racism in the West, and colonialism and imperialism in the “Third World,” this group of activists, writers, and political figures gathered to discuss the history and struggles of people of African descent and the meaning of Black Power.

      With never-before-seen texts from Stokely Carmichael, Walter Rodney, and C.L.R. James, Moving Against the System will prove invaluable to anyone interested in Black radical thought, as well as capturing a crucial moment of the political activity around 1968.

      Bio

      David Austin is the author of the Casa de las Americas Prize-winning Fear of a Black Nation: Race, Sex, and Security in Sixties Montreal, Moving Against the System:The 1968 Congress of Black Writers and the Making of Global Consciousness, and Dread Poetry and Freedom: Linton Kwesi Johnson and the Unfinished Revolution. He is also the editor of You Don’t Play with Revolution: The Montreal Lectures of C.L.R. James.

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  • 5
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    The Point Is to Change the World Selected Writings of Andaiye Alissa Trotz Canada, Andaiye
    9781771135078 Paperback HISTORY / Caribbean & West Indies Publication Date:May 31, 2020
    $34.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1 in | 457 gr | 320 pages Carton Quantity:22 Canadian Rights: Y Between the Lines
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      Description

      Radical activist, thinker, and comrade of Walter Rodney, Andaiye was one of the Caribbean’s most important political voices. For the first time, her writings are published in one collection. Through essays, letters, and journal entries, Andaiye’s thinking on the intersections of gender, race, class, and power are powerfully articulated, Caribbean histories emerge, and stories from a life lived at the barricades are revealed. We learn about the early years of the Working Peopl’s Alliance, the meaning asnd impact of the murder of Walter Rodney and the fall of the Grenada Revolution. Throughout, we bear witness to Andaiye’s acute understanding of politics rooted in communities and the daily lives of so-called ordinary people. Featuring forewords by Clem Seecharan and Robin DG Kelley, these texts will become vital tools in our own struggles to “overcome the power relations that are embedded in every unequal facet of our lives.”

      Bio

      Alissa Trotz is the Director of the Women and Gender Studies Institute and Director of the undergraduate Caribbean Studies Program at New College at the University of Toronto.



      Andaiye was a Guyanese social, political, and gender rights activist. She was an early member of the executive of the Working People’s Alliance, a founding member of the women’s development organization Red Thread in Guyana in 1986, and an executive member of the Caribbean Association for Feminist Research and Action.

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  • 6
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    9781771315609 Paperback POETRY / American Publication Date:October 07, 2021
    $22.95 CAD 5.8 x 8.55 x 0.32 in | 210 gr | 111 pages Carton Quantity:54 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      Description

      2022 Griffin Poetry Prize Finalist * 2022 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award Shortlist

      An expansive, hybrid, debut collection of prose poems, self-erasures, verse, and family photo cut-ups about growing up in a racially trinary, diversely troubled family.

      Dream of No One but Myself is an interdisciplinary, lyrical unravelling of the trauma-memoir-as-proof-it's-now-handled motif, illuminating what an auto-archival alternative to it might look like in motion. Through a complex juxtaposition of lyric verse and self-erasure, family keepsake and transformed photo, David Bradford engages the gap between the drive toward self-understanding and the excavated, tangled narratives autobiography can't quite reconcile. The translation of early memory into language is a set of decisions, and in Dream of No One but Myself, Bradford decides and then decides again, composing a deliberately unstable, frayed account of family inheritance, intergenerational traumas, and domestic tenderness.

      More essayistic lyric than lyrical essay, this is a satisfyingly unsettling and off-kilter debut that charts, shapes, fragments, and embraces the unresolvable. These gorgeous, halting poems ultimately take the urge to make linear sense of one's own history and diffract it into innumerable beams of light.

      Bio

      David Bradford is a poet, editor, and organizer based in Tiohtià:ke (Montréal). He is the author of several chapbooks, including Nell Zink is Damn Free (Blank Cheque Press, 2017) and The Plot (House House Press, 2018). His work has appeared in The Capilano Review, The Tiny, filling Station, The Fiddlehead, Carte Blanche, and elsewhere. He holds an MFA from the University of Guelph and is a founding editor of House House Press. Dream of No One but Myself is his first book.

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      Awards
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      "Dream of No One But Myself immerses the reader into an archival torrent of intergenerational trauma. This stunning debut never settles for formal complacency as it navigates the rhythmical intelligence of linguistic play, the anguished vigilance of footnotes, and the creased visual proofs of tenderness. Amid his troubled subjects, David Bradford's most urgent relationship is with language. The poet's inventive language never slips into just a stunt: it surprises and stirs with its honesty and vulnerability and manages to make whole everything it has so spectacularly torn." — Judges? Citation, 2022 Griffin Poetry Prize

      "To speak of the self within the deconstruction of language, to bring meaning to language fragments through the skillful use of docu-poetics: this brings joy. David Bradford's Dream of No One But Myself is an impressive and beautiful debut, bringing together experimental poetics with an urgent lyric voice. It understands that to get at meaning one must assemble and disassemble, obscure and clarify. A book you can't stop reading once you start." — Jury Citation, 2022 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award

      "How does sound assemble meaning, assemble relationships across time lines, patterned, steeped, torn and adorned? David Bradford's lyric compositions and decompositions perform narration erasures, narrating to unnarrate, visual, textual—and to somehow also live again in language, in consideration and construction, as recognition's dream." — Hoa Nguyen, author of A Thousand Times You Lose Your Treasure

      "In Dream of No One but Myself, the structural instability of a dream is mapped onto a family. It is then reflected in the mutability of poetic form. A father's estrangement pulls a child into contradiction, toward desiring connection while straining away from that connection. Poetic form also strains, stretches from prose poems in compact rhythmic units to disjunctive works that slice across the page, to suites of anguished, cut-up family photographs and beautifully abstract, decomposing erasure works that bloom into ruinous new shapes. These formal strategies are never forced; rather, they establish a narrative that doubles—that infuses and is transformed by—the Dream of No One but Myself." — Kaie Kellough, author of Magnetic Equator

      "Perhaps I would have held my breath for the entirety of this text if not for the wisp and grey, the ventilation surfacing in tide pools of visual poems—bramble relief against whiteout smears—watercolours, combed thru brunt and backhand. The poet's vision, the constant footnote to a whole contingency, manages to bear, be bearable, to be here, to pull through, and with, "survivor-survivor" narratives held carefully and hauntingly. Much love and relation to the composite shards, difficult folds and dovetail joints Bradford realizes in this important book." — Cecily Nicholson, author of Wayside Sang

  • 7
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    Autowar Assiyah Jamilla Touré Canada
    9781771315630 Paperback POETRY / American Publication Date:November 01, 2021
    $20.00 CAD 5.75 x 8.5 x 0.4 in | 180 gr | 86 pages Carton Quantity:70 Canadian Rights: Y Brick Books
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      2022 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award Longlist * 2022 ReLit Awards Longlist

      A visceral, vital, unblinking debut collection of poems exploring kinesthetic memory and longing, inherited violence, and the body as a geographical site.

      We're often told that we are given only what we can bear. For some of us our first lessons are in how much pain we're made to think we deserve—and the resulting scars are always meant to be kept secret. Assiyah Jamilla Touré's debut collection is a record of those scars—not those inflicted on us by the thousands of little wars we live in everyday, but those that come afterwards, those we inflict upon ourselves to mark the path.

      Each and every poem in Autowar was written on a cell phone, transcribing an urgent revisiting of old sites of pain, and also a revisiting of one young person's power and ability—to hurt themself, or others. These poems are powerful evocations of how even our scars have worlds and lives.

      here in the dark, me-space
      i am insatiable for my flesh
      i just can't get enough
      of tiny after-wounds
      that's me giving, still too soft
      for my own teeth

      Bio

      Assiyah Jamilla Touré is a multidisciplinary artist of West African descent. They were born and raised on Skwxwú7mesh land and lived for many years in Kanien'kehà:ka territory (Montreal) and are now based on the lands of the Mississaugas of the Anishinaabe, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the Wendat (Toronto). In 2018 their chapbook feral was published by House House Press. Autowar is their first full-length collection.

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      Awards
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      "Assiyah Jamilla writes with a unique genius that only belongs to those spirits of epochal change. Poems that are all at once a physicist's altar, a musician's trance, a reporter's gun. Our current definitions of the most sacred facets of the human journey cannot keep up with the phenomenal-architectural demands of this work. Read these poems to witness an enlightenment begin again." — Tongo Eisen-Martin, author of Heaven Is All Goodbyes

  • 8
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    Helem Stanley Wany Canada
    9781772620634 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / General Publication Date:September 14, 2021
    $20.00 CAD 7 x 8 x 0.5 in | 0 lb | 240 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Conundrum Press
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      Description

      A surrealist journey through alienation, lost dreams, and self-redemption

      A woman loses her sister to suicide and struggles with the overwhelming and confusing feelings that continue to plague her. A man reflects on a decade spent working in a call centre and the strange day-to-day momentum that caused him to unconsciously abandon his goals. Helem relies on a propulsive graphic narrative and evocative illustration to tell the intensely personal stories of two characters at a crossroads.

      The stories contained in Helem, originally published by TRIP as "Agalma" and "Sequences," delve deep into the internal lives of their characters. Helem, created while Wany was in a hallucinatory state brought on by a severe lack of sleep, also provides an intimate look into his own personal dreamscape.

      Bio

      Stanley Wany is an Afro-Canadian artist whose practice includes graphic novels, pen and ink drawings, and paintings. His works have been exhibited in Canada, the United States, FInland, France, Portugal and in Australia. His first graphic novel, Agalma, was nominated in 2016 for a Doug Wright Award at the Toronto Comics and Arts Festival.

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      Awards
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      "[Helem] feels like a gift for anyone who appreciates a certain type of mainstream comics art, but wishes it were allowed to flower unhampered." --The Comics Journal

      "This is one of those narratives that asks us to bring something of ourselves to it; as such every reader will take something different from it, reacting and interacting with its pages in distinct and individual ways."

      --Broken Frontier

  • 9
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    Canticles II: (MMXIX) George Elliott Clarke Canada
    9781771834094 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:October 01, 2019
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1.3 in | 760 gr | 400 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Guernica Editions
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      Description

      Canticles is a lyric-styled epic. This second testament--Canticles II (MMXIX) and Canticles II (MMXX)--issues re-readings--revisions, rewrites--of scriptures crucial to the emergent (Anglophone) African Diaspora in the Americas. Canticles II (MMXIX) follows Testament I (also issued in two parts--Canticles I (MMXVI) and Canticles I (MMXVII)) whose subject is History, principally, of slavery and imperialism and liberation and independence. Canticles II, the second part of a trilogy, is properly irreverent where necessary, but never blasphemous. It is scripture become what it always is, really, anyway: Poetry.

      Bio

      Acclaimed for his narrative lyric suites (Whylah Falls and Execution Poems), his lyric “colouring books” (Blue, Black, Red, and Gold), his selected poems (Blues and Bliss), his opera libretti and plays (Beatrice Chancy and Trudeau: Long March, Shining Path), George Elliott Clarke now presents us with his epic-in-progress, Canticles, a work that views History as a web of imperialism, enslavement, and insurrection. A native Africadian, Canada’s 7th Parliamentary Poet Laureate ranges the atlas and ransacks the library to ink lines unflinching before Atrocity and unquiet before Oppression.

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  • 10
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    Changing the Face of Canadian Literature A Diverse Canadian Anthology Dane Swan
    9781771835237 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Canadian Publication Date:September 01, 2020
    $25.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 1.1 in | 1 gr | 400 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Guernica Editions
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      Description

      A g call to action and accountability. – Shelagh Rogers

      Needless to say, moments like now, when the hurdles to becoming a respected author are at their lowest. When the only hurdles to being published are the quality of your writing and your patience to deal with certain less and less important gatekeepers. Moments in history like this, must be acknowledged and celebrated. That's what this anthology is: It's a celebration. A moment to cry out, “Look how many of us have a voice! There are stories, and poetry in this country that are about people like me! I am not alone!”

      Bio

      Dane Swan's second book, A Mingus Lullaby (Guernica Editions, 2016), was a finalist for the 2017 Trillium Book Prize for Poetry. A past Writer in Residence for the Open Book Foundation of Ontario, Dane has been short listed for the Monica Ladell Award (Scarborough Arts). His first book, Bending the Continuum (Guernica Editions, 2011), was a mid-summer recommended read from Open Book Toronto. Dane is the editor of Changing the Face of Canadian Literature: A Diverse Canadian Anthology. Dane is also an accomplished slam poet and touring spoken-word performer, placing second at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word, third at the Rust Belt Regional Slam and touring the US Midwest and West Coast regions. He has graced numerous festival stages, including: IFOA, Hillside, Lab Cab, Parkdale Arts, Junction Arts, and Pitter Patter festivals. For four years Dane and Dan D'Onorio hosted Toronto's $100 Slam series. Mr. Swan's poetry has been taught in schools and has been published in France, the UK, Bahamas, and Canada.

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      Awards
      Reviews
      Changing the Face of Canadian Literature comes close to accomplishing what the title proclaims. Swan acknowledges the extensive library of anthologies that have sought – more or less effectively – to bring equity to the publishing scene. This one authentically captures a literary moment that is alive and exciting, a moment that will, with ongoing vigilance, continue evolving in ever more inclusive directions."

      This anthology is animated by many voices and they all seem to speak to each other across the pages. Dane Swan's foreword is provocative and imaginative — for instance, asking the reader to consider what classrooms would be like if the dub poets were taught alongside/instead of the Confederation Poets. I mean, wow! The opening essay concludes with 'Congratulations, Canada, you finally have a literature that looks like the people who inhabit you. Do not take this moment for granted.' A great read and a call to action and accountability.

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