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The Phone Booth in Mr. Hirota's Garden
By (author): Heather Smith Illustrated by: Rachel Wada
9781459821033 Hardcover, Picture book, Printed dust jacket English Juvenile: Age (years) from 6 - 8, Grade (CAN) from 1 - 3, Grade (US) from 1 - 3, Reading age from 6 - 8 JUVENILE FICTION / Science & Nature / Disasters Sep 17, 2019
$19.95 CAD
Active 7.75 x 10.75 x 0.38 in 32 pages full color illustrations FSC certified – mixed sources C106973 Orca Book Publishers
Everyone lost someone the day the big wave came.

When the tsunami destroyed Makio's village, Makio lost his father . . . and his voice. The entire village is silenced by grief, and the young child's anger at the ocean grows. Then one day his neighbor, Mr. Hirota, begins a mysterious project—building a phone booth in his garden. At first Makio is puzzled; the phone isn't connected to anything. It just sits there, unable to ring. But as more and more villagers are drawn to the phone booth, its purpose becomes clear to Makio: the disconnected phone is connecting people to their lost loved ones. Makio calls to the sea to return what it has taken from him and ultimately finds his voice and solace in a phone that carries words on the wind.

The Phone Booth in Mr. Hirota's Garden is inspired by the true story of the wind phone in Otsuchi, Japan, which was created by artist Itaru Sasaki. He built the phone booth so he could speak to his cousin who had passed, saying, "My thoughts couldn't be relayed over a regular phone line, I wanted them to be carried on the wind." The Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011 destroyed the town of Otsuchi, claiming 10 percent of the population. Residents of Otsuchi and pilgrims from other affected communities have been traveling to the wind phone since the tsunami.

Originally from Newfoundland, Heather Smith now lives in Waterloo, Ontario, with her family. Her Newfoundland roots inspire much of her writing. Her middle-grade novel Ebb and Flow was short-listed for the Governor General's Literary Award, and her YA novel The Agony of Bun O'Keefe won the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children's Book Award and was short-listed for the Amy Mathers Teen Book Award and the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People.

Rachel Wada's work is defined by heavy texture, bold color and intricate details that capture the nuances of people, places and ideas, real and surreal. Rachel's identity as Japanese-Cantonese, an immigrant and a woman informs her artistic practice. She loves to put her own spin on traditional techniques, motifs and symbolism inspired by her cultural background. This duality of old and new is also apparent in her use of both traditional and digital mediums, and she draws inspiration from a variety of sources, from Japanese woodblock prints, Chinese pottery and ceramics, food packaging design to traditional folk art. She has a special love for the ocean, tea and noodles of all kinds. Rachel lives in Vancouver.

Key Selling Points
A young boy learns to grieve his father who was swept away in a tsunami.
Examines grief, loss, tragedy, coping mechanisms and resilience. The story is culturally specific, but the themes are universal.
The illustrator has been nominated for the National Magazine Awards (Illustration, 2018) and received an Honorable Mention in the 3x3 International Illustration Show.
The Phone Booth in Mr. Hirota’s Garden is inspired by the true story of the wind phone in Otsuchi, Japan, which was created by artist Itaru Sasaki. The Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011 destroyed the town of Otsuchi, claiming 10 percent of the population. Residents of Otsuchi and pilgrims from other affected communities have been traveling to the wind phone since the tsunami.

Marketing and Promo Plans

Print and online advertising campaigns
Promotion at national and regional school, library and trade conferences
Extensive ARC distribution, including NetGalley
Blog and social media promotion
Outreach in Orca newsletter
Planned appearances at local writers festivals

? “A beautifully rendered tale of loss, love, grief, and gentle healing.” - Kirkus Reviews, starred review

? “A moving tale...offers comfort and peace to those left behind.” - Booklist, starred review

? “An affecting, well-rendered resource for talking about catastrophes and grief both personal and communal.” - Publisher Weekly, starred review

? “Smith spins a quietly moving narrative...Wada’s large-scale woodblock style illustrations are a perfect complement to the story’s restrained text...The graceful way in which this book handles a sensitive and serious subject makes it a first purchase for most picture book collections.” - School Library Journal, starred review

“Text and illustration come together to make this a memorable story of love, loss, and despair tinged with the hope that comes when healing can finally begin...This book has a wide range of appeal and will fit into many curriculum areas. Highly Recommended.” - School Library Connection

“A moving concept, and the book might open discussion about ways to deal with death and loss.” - The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books

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