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TouchWood Editions Fall 2011 Adult

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Somebody’s Child
Stories about Adoption
Edited by: Bruce Gillespie Edited by: Lynne Van Luven Foreword by: Michaela Pereira

Edited by :

Bruce Gillespie ,

Edited by :

Lynne Van Luven ,

Foreword by :

Michaela Pereira

ISBN:

9781926971032

Product Form:

Paperback

Form detail:

Trade
Paperback , Trade
English

Audience:

General Trade
Sep 15, 2011
$19.95 CAD
Active

Dimensions:

7.5in x 5.5 x 0.75 in | 300 gr

Page Count:

256 pages
TouchWood Editions
TouchWood
LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Essays
  • Short Description

Universal stories of longing and belonging.

Our quest for origin and, by extension, identity is universal to the human experience. For the twenty-five contributors to Somebody’s Child, the topic of adoption is not—and perhaps never can be—a neutral issue. With unique courage, each of them discusses their experience of the adoption process. Some share stories of heartbreak; others have discovered joy; some have searched for closure. Somebody’s Child captures the many unforgettable faces and voices of adoption.

The third book in a series of anthologies about the twenty-first-century family, Somebody’s Child follows Nobody’s Mother and Nobody’s Father, two essay collections from childless adults on parenthood, family and choices. Together, these three books challenge readers to reexamine traditional definitions of the concept of “family.”

Universal stories of longing and belonging.

Our quest for origin and, by extension, identity is universal to the human experience. For the twenty-five contributors to Somebody’s Child, the topic of adoption is not—and perhaps never can be—a neutral issue. With unique courage, each of them discusses their experience of the adoption process. Some share stories of heartbreak; others have discovered joy; some have searched for closure. Somebody’s Child captures the many unforgettable faces and voices of adoption.

The third book in a series of anthologies about the twenty-first-century family, Somebody’s Child follows Nobody’s Mother and Nobody’s Father, two essay collections from childless adults on parenthood, family and choices. Together, these three books challenge readers to reexamine traditional definitions of the concept of “family.”

Bruce Gillespie is an award-winning Canadian writer and editor and an assistant professor in the journalism program at Wilfrid Laurier University's Brantford campus. He has worked for Canadian Business and MoneySense, and his writing has appeared in a number of magazines and newspapers, including Canadian Geographic, Chatelaine, Financial Post Business Magazine, Applied Arts, Quill & Quire, and the National Post. He has received four honourable mentions at the National Magazine Awards and a Best Consumer Feature in the Rogers Media Best Of Awards in 2001. Bruce is the editor of A Family by Any Other Name: Exploring Queer Relationships and was co-editor of the two anthologies Somebody's Child: Stories About Adoption and Nobody's Father: Life Without Kids. He was recently appointed editor-in-chief of J-Source.ca, a hub for news, information, and commentary about Canadian journalism. Visit Bruce online at brucegillespie.com.

Lynne Van Luven is an associate professor in the Department of Writing at the University of Victoria, where she teaches journalism and creative non-fiction. Her writing has appeared in numerous publications across Canada. She has edited four previous anthologies, including Nobody's Mother: Life Without Kids, Nobody's Father: Life Without Kids, and Somebody's Child: Stories About Adoption. Lynne lives in Victoria, BC. Please visit finearts.uvic.ca/lynnevanluven.

Like the pieces of the puzzle in the lives of adoptees seeking their identity, these essays fit together to form as complete an understanding as is ever possible. —Betty Jane Hegerat

With stories flooding in from all angles of adoption, the final 25 range from the classic young woman forced to give up her baby to the child who is always looking for an unknown face in the crowd, to the gay parent, the sibling dynamics and more. —Monday Magazine

Each [story]—like life itself—is full of unexpected twists and surprises. But all of the narrators are honest, compassionate and have something important to say about the ways their lives have been forever changed by adoption. —The Toronto Star

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