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Consortium Adult Fall 2017

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  • Sales Rights

    For sale with exclusive rights in: CA
  • Supply Detail

    Distributor: Publishers Group Canada Supplies to: CA Availability: Available Expected Ship Date: Oct 16, 2019 On Sale Date: Sep 22, 2017 Carton Quantity: 84 $25.50 CAD
  • Catalogues

Calling a Wolf a Wolf
By (author): Kaveh Akbar
9781938584671 Paperback, Trade English General Trade POETRY / American / General Sep 22, 2017
$25.50 CAD
Active 6 x 9 x 0.3 in 100 pages Alice James Books
  • 2017 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards Gold Winner
  • 2018 Levis Reading Prize Winner
  • 2017 Julie Suk Award Winner
  • A 2017 Nautilus Silver Award Winner
  • 2017 Florida Book Award Gold Winner
  • A 2018 First Horizon Award Winner
  • Winner of the 2018 Eric Hoffer Small Press Award
  • Shortlisted for the Eric Hoffer Award Grand Prize
  • A 2018 Montaigne Medal Finalist
  • A 2017 NPR Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Library Journal Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Entropy Magazine Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 The Coil Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Sundress Publications Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Indianapolis Monthly Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Largehearted Boy Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Volume 1 Brooklyn Best Book of the Year
  • A 2017 Interview Best Book of the Year
  • This award-winning debut boldly confronts addiction and courses the strenuous path of recovery, beginning in the wilds of the mind. Poems confront craving, control, the constant battle of alcoholism and sobriety, and the questioning of the self and its instincts within the context of this never-ending fight. From "Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before": Sometimes you just have to leave whatever's real to you, you have to clomp through fields and kick the caps offall the toadstools. Sometimes you have to march all the way to Galilee or the literal foot of God himself before you realize you've already passed the place where you were supposed to die. I can no longer remember the being afraid, only that it came to an end.

    Kaveh Akbar is the founding editor ofDivedapper. His poems appear recently or soon inThe New Yorker, Poetry, APR, Tin House, PBS NewsHour, and elsewhere. He is the author ofCalling a Wolf a Wolf (Alice James 2017) and the chapbookPortrait of the Alcoholic (Sibling Rivalry). The recipient of a 2016 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation and the Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, Kaveh was born in Tehran, Iran, and currently lives and teaches in Florida.

    Praise for Calling a Wolf a Wolf “In ‘Heritage,’ a fierce poem dedicated to an Iranian woman executed for killing the man attempting to rape her, award-winning poet Akbar proclaims, 'in books love can be war-ending/…in life we hold love up to the light/ to marvel at its impotence.' Yet if real-life love is disappointing ('The things I’ve thought I've loved/ could sink an ocean liner'), Akbar proves what books can do in his exceptional debut, which brings us along on his struggle with addiction, a dangerous comfort and soul-eating monster he addresses boldly ('thinking if I called a wolf a wolf I might dull its fangs'). His work stands out among literature on the subject for a refreshingly unshowy honesty; Akbar runs full tilt emotionally but is never self-indulgent. These poems find the speaker poised between life’s clatter and rattle, wanting to retreat (‘so much/ of being alive is breaking’) yet hungering for more (‘I'm told what seems like joy/ is oftenjoy'). Indeed, despite his acknowledged disillusion and his failings (‘my whole life I answered every cry for help with a pour'), he has loved, and an electric current runs through the collection that keeps reader and writer going. VERDICT Excellent work from an important new poet.” —Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal, STARRED review “Akbar has what every poet needs: the power to make, from emotions that others have felt, memorable language that nobody has assembled before.” —Stephanie Burt, The Yale Review “John Berryman and James Wright (and his son Franz Wright) haunt Calling a Wolf a Wolf, but Akbar also has a voice so distinctly his—tinted in old Persian, dipped in modern American, ancient and millennial, addict and ascetic, animal and more animal. In the end, nothing brings man—human or man—down to Earth more than the kingdom of flora and fauna.” —Porochista Khakpour, Virginia Quarterly Review "Kaveh Akbar has evolved a poetics that(often) suggests the infinite within each object, gesture, event. The smallest thing in these poems pushes one up against something intractable and profound. Surface and depth constantly turn into each other. Narrative, the dilemmas of personal history and anguish are handled with equal sophistication. 'Odd, for an apocalypse to announce itself with such bounty.' This is bounty, an intensely inventive and original debut.” —Frank Bidart, author of Metaphysical Dog and Watching the Spring Festival “In Calling a Wolf a Wolf, Kaveh Akbar exquisitely and tenaciously braids astonishment and atonement into a singular lyric voice. The desolation of alcoholism widens into hard-won insight: ‘the body is a mosque borrowed from Heaven.’ Doubt and fear spiral into grace and beauty. Akbar’s mind, like his language, is perpetually in motion. His imagery—wounded and resplendent—is masterful and his syntax ensnares and releases music that’s both delicate and muscular. Kaveh Akbarhas crafted one of the best debuts in recent memory. In his hands, awe and redemption hinge into unforgettable and gorgeous poems.” —Eduardo C. Corral “You can open this stunning debut, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, anywhere and find the critical tenderness that permeates Kaveh Akbar’s work. The work here means to go out on limbs, be it to fling blossoms, chew fireflies, or to push old nests into the river once the rearing is done. There is an engagement here with faith that extends beyond religion. . . . The poems have as much audacity as humility, a rare mix of openness in a time of flinching anxiety.” —francine j. harris “The struggle from late youth on, with and without God, agony, narcotics and love is a torment rarely recorded with such sustained eloquence and passion as you will find in Calling a Wolf a Wolf.” —Fanny Howe

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