Kids & Young Adult Books

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  • 11
    catalogue cover
    Series: Gwen
    Gwen in West Wind Calling West Wind Calling Carolyn Pogue Canada
    9780986638879 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Historical Age (years) from 10 - 12, Grade (CAN) from Grade 3 - Grade 5, Grade (US) from Grade 3 - Grade 5, Age (years) from 10 - 12, Grade (CAN) from Grade 3 - Grade 5, Grade (US) from Grade 3 - Grade 5 On Sale Date: October 01, 2012
    5.25 x 7.75 x 0.25 in | 160 pages Carton Quantity: 1 Canadian Rights: Y Sumach Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Thirteen year old Home Girl Gwen Peters has already had more adventures than most people. Orphaned at 11 and trained to be a servant, she travelled by ship to a new life in Canada. Her spunk, sense of humour and the memory of seeing a grand lady of the theatre, Mohawk performer E. Pauline Johnson, have kept her going. It's a good thing, because there are more challenges ahead. The first one comes after watching two coffins, father and son, lowered into the cold Brantford ground. Soon, Gwen becomes "pilot of the plains" as she and her mistress take the train to a new life in Calgary, Northwest Territories. The year is 1898, and the city is new and growing. It attracts people with fresh visions and hope. But it also attracts those who want to make a quick buck. As Gwen meets people of the land, the Cree and Blackfoot, and a man who helped to build the railway that new Canadians are so proud of, she also meets people who are trying to take this land all for themselves. Good thing Gwen packed her courage in her trunk when she headed west!
      Bio
      Carolyn Pogue has written twelve books for children, teens and adults. She also gives talks on peacemaking, cultural understanding and conflict resolution across the country. She found inspiration for the Gwen series in the life of her grandmother, a Barnardo Home Child, and the life of Mohawk poet performer E. Pauline Johnson. Carolyn now lives in Calgary, her home base for frequent travel.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      CCBC Best Books 2013, Commended
      Reviews
      "Highly Recommended."
  • 12
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    Series: Submarine Outlaw
    Outlaw in India Philip Roy Canada
    9781553801771 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Action & Adventure On Sale Date: September 15, 2012
    $11.95 CAD 5.25 x 7.63 x 0.5 in | 214 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y Ronsdale Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      In Outlaw in India, the fifth volume in the best-selling Submarine Outlaw series, Alfred and his crew of Seaweed the seagull and Hollie the dog begin their exploration of India with a piece of bad luck when they surface behind a frigate and bring the wrath of the Indian navy down upon them. After a near fatal encounter off Kochi, Alfred befriends a ten-year-old homeless and illiterate but highly intelligent boy, and is given the chance to explore the changing face of India through the eyes of one of its "untouchables." Discovering India to be an ancient land filled with extremes of beauty, wealth, tradition and danger, Alfred is tricked into making an overland pilgrimage to Varanasi, one of the world's oldest cities. Along the journey he witnesses practices which deny human equality and dignity, but also happy events that celebrate the spirit of new beginnings, as personified in Ganesh, the Hindu god with four arms and the head of an elephant. Alfred cannot help falling in love with India, the most beautiful place he has ever seen. And for the first time, he leaves a part of himself behind. "Perhaps the most imposing character in Outlaw in India is not a character at all. It is India. The country, as Alfred experiences it, is a living entity, a complicated being of the expected (e.g., the heat and amazing foods) and the surprising (e.g., discrimination and kindness). Though the series could easily be promoted as a great adventure series for boys, the Submarine Outlaw books will continue to garner fans of both genders for its great characters and adventure with a frisson of the impossible and the hope for everything working out well (a.k.a. the happy ending). Readers will continue to find all that here in Outlaw in India, fresh and engrossing, just as each new book in the series has offered." - CanLit for Little Canadians "Outlaw in India . . . is a stand-alone novel that can be enjoyed without reading the others. . . . The plot is full of incident and excitement. . . . This fifth volume is the best Submarine Outlaw book yet. It's a fast-paced, fun read with interesting themes that will appeal to anyone who likes travel and adventure. Highly Recommended." - CM Magazine "[T]houghtful and philosophical . . . a Humanities curriculum would be well served to add . . . [Outlaw in India] . . . to a list of recommended reads in multicultural literature." - The Deakin Review of Children's Literature Lexile Measure: 700L
      Bio

      Philip Francis Roy was born and raised in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. He grew up beside the ocean, and it now features in many of the stories he writes. His university studies included music and history, but he also knew from an early age that he wanted to write novels. Travelling far and wide, Roy continues to weave tales of adventure, history, geography and cultural diversity. Commenting on his Submarine Outlaw series, Philip says, "These are the stories I wished I could have read when I was young. It is such a joy to write them now and share them with readers young and old." When not travelling, Philip divides his time between Nova Scotia and Ontario.


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  • 13
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    Series: The Loyalists Trilogy
    Freedom Bound Jean Rae Baxter Canada
    9781553801436 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Historical On Sale Date: January 15, 2012
    $11.95 CAD 5.25 x 7.63 x 0.55 in | 246 pages Carton Quantity: 44 Canadian Rights: Y Ronsdale Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      In this, the final instalment of Jean Rae Baxter's best-selling young adult trilogy, eighteen-year-old Charlotte sails from Canada to Charleston in the beleaguered Thirteen Colonies to join her new husband Nick. During these final months of the American Revolution, she must muster all her wit and courage when she has to rescue Nick from being tortured as a spy in an alligator-infested South Carolina swamp. She must also find ways to bring freedom to a pair of teenage runaway slaves she has befriended. Freedom Bound delivers a frank and realistic picture of the slave system and a powerful account of what was at stake for both white and black Loyalists as they prepared to find a new home in the country that was soon to be Canada. Like The Way Lies North and Broken Trail, the two novels that preceded it, Freedom Bound contains a wealth of carefully researched historical details of one of the least known chapters of our history.
      Bio

      Jean Rae Baxter writes both for an adult general audience and for young adults. Freedom Bound is the third volume in the Forging a Nation Series about the United Empire Loyalist experience, and won the Bronze Medal in the Moonbeam Awards. The Way Lies North (2007) won the Arts Hamilton Award for a young adult book and was nominated for the Red Maple and Stellar awards. Broken Trail won the Gold Medal in the Moonbeam Awards. Jean Rae Baxter sat on Lit Live Reading Series organizing committee for ten years and served on the Arts Hamilton's Literary Advisory Committee for six years. Jean lives in Hamilton.


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  • 14
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    I'll Be Home Soon Luanne Armstrong Canada
    9781553801801 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes On Sale Date: January 07, 2012
    $11.95 CAD 5.25 x 7.63 x 0.4 in | 170 pages Carton Quantity: 52 Canadian Rights: Y Ronsdale Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      In I'll Be Home Soon, Luanne Armstrong takes the reader on a tension-filled ride as Regan, a young girl living in the inner city, searches for her mother who has mysteriously disappeared. Homeless but by no means hapless, Regan is on her own much of the time but also receives help from a wide diversity of people: a young homeless boy like herself, her kung fu teacher, a university researcher, her grandmother, and a group of people who survive as bottle pickers. On the street, she must learn who it is she can truly trust, and it is not always those whom she (and the reader) might expect. Through her search for her mother, and in her connections with the people who truly help and care for her, Regan discovers her own inner strength and independence. In this fast-paced and sensitive story, Armstrong draws us into the shadowy and difficult side of inner-city life to show us both the dark and the compassionate sides of the people who survive in its midst. 
      Bio
      Luanne Armstrong, MFA, Ph.D, is a novelist, freelance writer, editor, and publisher. She is deeply interested in writing about place and nature. Her research interests also include the ethics of autobiographical writing, ecological identity, and writing as inquiry. She has published over fifty stories and essays in magazines and journals, and is the author of fourteen books, including poetry, novels, and children's books. She has been nominated for numerous prizes and awards. Her firstnovel, Annie, was a best-seller in Germany. Her YA novel, Jeannie and the Gentle Giants, was nominated for Canadian Library Association's Book of the Year, the Sheila Egoff BC Book Prize Award and the Red Cedar Award. It placed second in the Silver Birch Award. It was also named by McNally Robinson Booksellers in Winnipeg as one of their top ten all time best children's books. Luanne has taught Creative Writing for many years at the college level including at Langara College, and at summer schools in BC and Alberta. She is a popular speaker and workshop leader at writing conferences. She is presently working on a book about the ethics of autobiographical writing for Pacific Educational Press as well as a book of essays about environmental ethics. She is an adjunct professor of Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia. Luanne currently lives on her organic heritage farm in the Kootenay region of BC.
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  • 15
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    Rosa Rose Robert Priest Canada, Joan Krygsman Canada
    9781894987738 Paperback JUVENILE NONFICTION / Poetry Publication Date: June 08, 2013
    $10.00 CAD 5.85 x 8.85 x 0.25 in | 56 pages Carton Quantity: 80 Canadian Rights: Y Wolsak and Wynn Publishers Ltd.
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Silver Medal for the Moonbeam Children's Book Awards

      Honorable mention in the Lion and the Unicorn Award for Excellence in North American Poetry

      From Terry Fox to Ghandi, Rosa Parks to Elijah Harper, Robert Priest has collected some of his most inspiring poems together in this book for young people. Priest, an award-winning poet and musician, has written these thought-provoking poems to introduce children to men and women across the planet that have changed the world. Illustrated with bold line drawings by Joan Krygsman, Rosa Rose is a captivating book sure to delight all readers.

      Bio

      Joan Krygsman is a visual artist and writer from Dundas, Ontario, where she lives with her six year old daughter Fritha. Trained at the Ontario College of Art and Design, Joan works in acrylic, ink, collage and pixels. Along with regular gallery shows, her designs are showcased in children's books, annual festivals across Ontario, and on her website www.stripedaardvark.com.


      Joan Krygsman is a visual artist and writer from Dundas, Ontario, where she lives with her six year old daughter Fritha. Trained at the Ontario College of Art and Design, Joan works in acrylic, ink, collage and pixels. Along with regular gallery shows, her designs are showcased in children?s books, annual festivals across Ontario, and on her website www.stripedaardvark.com.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      "Rosa Rose and Other Poems is a beautiful poetry collection that needs to be on every child's bookshelf and is sure to make young readers lovers of history and poetry." - Canadian Materials Magazine

      "Dundas artist Joan Krygsman is no stranger to bright colours ? her canvasses boast vibrant shades of yellow, red and blue. Her colourful portraits of Terry Fox, Rosa Parks, Louis Armstrong and Deepa Metha, which grace the cover of Rosa Rose and Other Poems by Robert Priest, are no exception. In Rosa Rose, poet Priest celebrates people who have influenced his life, from heroes at home like Elijah Harper to the anonymous man in Tiananmen Square. The collection, which is ideal for children, also introduces readers to figures they may not be familiar with like Wangari Maathai and Julia Butterfly Hill." - Hamilton Magazine

      "Priest is a poet-troubadour in the 1960s mode of Bob Dylan: To illuminate injustice and to celebrate struggle against it. This premise lies behind his latest children?s-oriented book of verse, Rosa Rose, wherein Priest presents a gallery of heroes, those who suffered to achieve real liberation for the poor and oppressed, or simply to make life better for others." - The Chronicle Herald

  • 16
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    On Fire Dianne Linden Canada
    9781927068380 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes Grade (US) from 10 - 12, Grade (US) from 10 - 12 Publication Date: March 15, 2013
    $15.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.6 in | 176 pages Carton Quantity: 52 Canadian Rights: Y Thistledown Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Part comedy, part mystery, part allegory, On Fire is narrated alternately by two characters: Matti Iverly, a fourteen-year-old girl with Tourette Syndrome. In Matti’s case, her tics are primarily vocal. As she confides early in the book, "At school they called me Tourette’s Girl, like I came out of a phone booth wearing a costume and made funny noises for people’s entertainment. But I was a serious person, waiting for a serious purpose." When a young man with amnesia wonders out of the heart of wildfire country, Matti finds that purpose and fulfills it with courage, humour and dignity. Within the scope of the story, it’s clear that Matti rules despite the isolation of her village, and the ominous care-taking to which she commits herself in trying to right the life of Dan, the strange seventeen-year-old teen with amnesia who mysteriously appears out of the smoke and fire and then disappears again.

      When Dan first takes up the narration, he is hiding out in a ghost town across the lake from Matti’s village. It’s clear he’s far more troubled than she realized. He’s haunted by ghosts and demons and vague memories of something that happened to him in the mountains. As Dan appears almost mythically out of a forest fire area and collapses at Matti’s feet, he reverses the journey countless adolescent males make every year into the wildfire we call mental illness. Dan is lucky. He finds Matti Iverly. Because of her stubborn persistence, he connects with an odd assortment of people who as much as any help he gets from doctors, assist him in reassembling his life. They become his community of concern, his family.

      Through a series of synchronous events, Matti finds Dan again in a mental hospital. She becomes very much a part of his path back to reality, at least his version of it. As a result we see her grow into a person who believes in her own strength, and Dan morph into a young man who feels he has a future.

      Bio

      Dianne Linden was born in Kansas City, and grew up in Bolder Colorado where she completed her university education. After working in the eastern US and Germany, she made her way to Canada to work as a teacher at both the high school and college level. In addition to her career and raising a family, Dianne’s work as a writer has always remained central to her life. Her poetry, short stories, and essays for adults have appeared in many Canadian literary magazines and have been anthologized in Canada, and Britain. She has also published two award-winning YA novels. Balancing her full time writing career is her volunteer work, which is diligently focused on raising money for African grandmothers through the Stephen Lewis Foundation.

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  • 17
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    The Beggar King Michelle Barker Canada
    9781927068373 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Fantasy & Magic Grade (US) from 10 - 12, Grade (US) from 10 - 12 Publication Date: March 15, 2013
    $15.95 CAD 5.42 x 8.53 x 0.66 in | 212 pages Carton Quantity: 44 Canadian Rights: Y Thistledown Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      He has no talent, they said; then how was it that he could unleash and wield such a powerful magic, and that he would be the one chosen by the Beggar King to claim the undermagic.

      Beware this door! Beware your soul! May this door never be opened, or the beggar shall be king. As Jordan Elliott stood before the brass door, he knew the risks. Beware the beggar who would be king! He knew of the “undermagic”, that ancient and dark source of power that had been locked away because prophets of old deemed it too unpredictable and destructive. But he opened the door anyway, because he was the one who could. What he unleashed would take down the peaceful world in which he lived; it would imprison his family and slowly poison the girl he loved. The price was great, but what Jordan received in return, almost unlimited power, was so seductive that he could not refuse this gift from the king who ruled the darkness beyond the door.

      "The Beggar King is richly imagined. The “undercats,” especially Sarmillion himself, the bridges that refuse passage more than they allow it, the lure of the brass plate that opens for young Jordan and apparently for no one else… Michelle Barker has woven these elements, and many others, together into a story that will not let you go until the end. If you love original fantasy and a great adventure story, you will enjoy The Beggar King." — Maggie de Vries

      Bio

      Michelle Barker lives in Penticton with her husband and family. Her poetry has been published in literary reviews around the world, including the 2011 Best Canadian Poetry anthology. A chapbook of her poems, Old Growth, Clear Cut: Poems of Haida Gwaii, has just been published by Leaf Press in 2012. Michelle? short fiction has been published in several journals. She has also published non-fiction in magazines, newspapers and literary reviews, and she won a National Magazine Award in personal journalism. Michelle is an editor and leads creative writing workshops. She is studying for her Master ?s degree in creative writing at UBC ?s optional-residency program.

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  • 18
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    Escape to Gold Mountain A Graphic History of the Chinese in North America David H.T. Wong Canada
    9781551524764 Paperback JUVENILE NONFICTION / Comics & Graphic Novels Publication Date: October 01, 2012
    $21.95 CAD 7 x 10 x 0.56 in | 240 pages Carton Quantity: 15 Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Winner, Chinese American Library Association Best Book Award winner (Fiction)

      The history of Chinese immigration to Canada and the US over the past 100-plus years has been fraught with sadness and indignity; newcomers to North America encountered discrimination, subjugation, and separation from loved ones. As well, in Canada the Chinese head tax was introduced after the Canadian Parliament passed the Chinese Immigration Act of 1885 to discourage Chinese immigrants, while in the US, the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act outright banned Chinese immigration to America. Despite such obstacles, these Chinese newcomers persevered in order to create a better life for the generations to come.

      Escape to Gold Mountain is the first graphic novel to tell their story: based on historical documents and interviews with elders, this is a vivid history of the Chinese in their search for "Gold Mountain" (the Chinese colloquialism for North America) as seen through the eyes of the Wong family. They traverse the challenges of eking out an existence in their adopted homeland with hope and determination, creating a poignant immigrant's legacy for their sons and daughters.

      Escape to Gold Mountain is a moving and gripping story for all young North Americans.

      Ages 12 and up.

      Bio

      David H.T. Wong was born and raised in Vancouver. He is an accomplished architect and a respected Asian Canadian community activist whose family first came to Canada from China 130 years ago.

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    • Interior Images

        

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Chinese American Library Association Best Book Award (Fiction) 2013, Winner
      Reviews
      This is action-packed history for new generations in which David H.T. Wong presents over 100 years of Gold Mountain stories, drawn and told with passion and a critical eye. A rousing tribute to our pioneers!
      -Paul Yee, author of Ghost Train and Tales from Gold Mountain
      A tour-de-force artistic and conceptual achievement that will redefine how Chinese in North America and others perceive our common history.
      -Anthony B. Chan, author of Gold Mountain and Perpetually Cool: The Many Lives of Anna May Wong
      Escape To Gold Mountain is an important book that plays to the strength of the graphic novel form. It encapsulizes the struggle of the Chinese in North America in a sweeping visual narrative, attacking a complex storyline that takes in the opium wars to early immigration, railroad workers, the head tax, and the Chinese exclusion act. Forget Batman; Escape to Gold Mountain reveals that the real superheroes are the ones who toil and sacrifice for their families in the face of obscurity.
      -Tony Wong, journalist
      The First Nations people have a great oral tradition, and David H.T. Wong's comic book is a wonderful way to continue that tradition, along with his illustrations. This is a book for new and future generations that will create pride in the rich cultures we share.
      -Chief Leonard George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation
      This book is an excellent introduction to the complex issue of Chinese immigration as told from the Chinese point of view.
      -Blogcritics.org
      The author's panel work makes an at-times painful history easily read ... The comic is really a jumping-off point for those interested in the subject matter -- the epic research that Wong put towards the book made for enough bibliography and reading resources to launch a thousand syllabi, or at least a sense that an important portion of history may have been missing from your childhood textbooks.
      -San Francisco Bay Guardian
      Wong proves that pictures can indeed hold thousands (and thousands!) of words, capturing 200+ years of history in as many pages; he also includes a "Chinglish" glossary, a timeline that overlaps China and Gam Saan, maps, extensive notes, and a thorough bibliography.
      -Book Dragon blog from the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
      Eloquent, lyrical black-and-gray panels that conjure the environment and living conditions as well as the people.
      -Library Journal
      This book is an excellent introduction to the complex issue of Chinese immigration as told from the Chinese point of view.
      -Seattle Post-Intelligencer
      Wong's book is a great illustrated yarn -- make that several generational yarns woven together -- telling the story of Chinese families coming to North America (or "Gold Mountain" as those immigrants called this continent). Wong doesn't flinch from showing the discrimination and hardships Chinese faced as they sought to build new lives here, nor does he neglect the triumphant contributions they have made. Told and drawn with humour and bravado, this is a no digest of historical facts. It's a page turner for all ages that is likely to become a classic.
      -The Tyee
      Escape to Gold Mountain is forgotten history, and all the more important for teen readers in particular, because it has been so overlooked. Wong does a solid job of bringing his characters to life and making the narrative both informative and emotional ... As a fan of both American and Canadian history, I found this graphic novel compelling and perfectly suited for the illustrated form.
      -Bookslut
      This is a moving book that deserves to be read.
      -VOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates) Magazine
      Although the comic-book format makes some serious moments darkly funny, one reads with horror about atrocities once commonplace in our backyard.
      -Seattle Weekly
      If you want to read about a shameful chapter of American history in convenient comic-book form, you should read Escape to Gold Mountain.
      -The Stranger
      To be able to visually follow the characters in Escape to Gold Mountain through more than two hundred pages as fully formed and central actors in history is a highly entertaining and enjoyable step towards decolonizing our history.
      -BC Studies
      Inventive ... a hip, accessible, comic-book format that's chock full of historical details.
      -Seattle Times
  • 19
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    9781927068397 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes Grade (US) from 10 - 12, Grade (US) from 10 - 12 Publication Date: March 15, 2013
    $14.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.48 x 0.6 in | 184 pages Carton Quantity: 30 Canadian Rights: Y Thistledown Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Living with the Hawk explores the traumatic events in the life of Blair Russell, a high school football player who struggles to do what’s right in tough circumstances. Key characters are his brother, Blake, the team’s quarterback; Jordan Phelps, the star receiver, a kid with a need to control others; Paul Russell, his father, an Anglican priest; and Barb Russell, his mother. Blair is the subject of taunting and hazing, including physical intimidation on the football field by Jordan. His brother Blake used to stick up for him, but seems ambivalent about helping him now, a concern that Blair both resents and yet understands. At a football party where beer flows freely, Blair spots Jordan and a group of his laughing, drunken buddies, including his brother; he is shocked when he sees that they are urinating on a girl who has passed out. From that moment conflict grows between the brothers. In the backdrop to the event Blair begins to suspect that his brother is not who he thought he was. Like the sparrow hawk that survives on the kills it makes at the birdfeeder outside their home, in Blair’s mind, Blake has become a wicked predator of the helpless.

      The next time Blair sees the abused girl from the party, Jordan Phelps is relentlessly harassing her in the school corridor. The trapped girl, Amber, is helpless and must suffer the humiliation of Jordon’s taunts. Suddenly a native girl intervenes, calls Jordan asshole, and knees him in the groin. Buoyed by her actions Blair can no longer stay neutral and confronts Jordon himself. For his efforts, Jordan slams him into a locker, but a teacher breaks up the fight before it can continue. At home Blair learns the native girl is Anna Big Sky, and she’s in his brother’s class; he begins to suspect that his brother Blake likes her and suddenly he feels jealous. Not long after his newly developed interest in Anna, Blair begins hearing racist slurs in the locker room they are directed at her and generated by Jordon Phelps and his buddies, Vaughn Foster, and Todd Branton. Frustrated by his inability to confront them, Blair’s anger causes him to argue with his brother about Anna. They both lose their tempers and then fight at football practice. Some days later Blair hears talk of a body found in a field north of town and when he learns it’s that of Anna Big Sky; he is devastated. Certain that his brother played a part in her violent death, Blair wonders what to do. He finally phones Crime Stoppers, naming those involved in Anna’s death, including that of his brother, an action that divides the Russell family and leads to a tragedy that changes their lives forever.

      Bio

      Robert Currie is a poet and fiction writer who is a founding board member of the Saskatchewan Festival of Words and a former chairman of the Saskatchewan Writers’ Guild, Currie was honoured in the fall of 2009 when he received the Saskatchewan Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts. Currie has taught creative writing for four summers at the Saskatchewan School of the Arts in Fort San and for three summers at the Sage Hill Writing Experience in Lumsden. He is the author of ten books, including the short story collections, Night Games and Things You Don’t Forget, and the novel, Teaching Mr. Cutler. He lives in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan where he taught for thirty years at Central Collegiate, winning the Joseph Duffy Memorial Award for excellence in teaching language arts.

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  • 20
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    9781927068434 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Legends, Myths, Fables Grade (US) from 08 - 11, Grade (US) from 08 - 11 Publication Date: September 30, 2013
    $10.95 CAD 5 x 7.07 x 0.47 in | 112 pages Carton Quantity: 72 Canadian Rights: Y Thistledown Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Bio

      Marty Chan is a nationally-known dramatist, screenwriter and author. He is the recent winner of the Edmonton Book Prize for his juvenile novel The Mystery of the Frozen Brains and former Gemini-nominated and gold medal winner for "The Orange Seed Myth and Other Lies Mothers Tell". Chan's last book in the Barnabas Bigfoot series, A Harry Tangle was in the top ten 2013 Alberta Readers' Choice Awards. Marty Chan lives in Edmonton, Alberta.

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